Cision (Canada): Launch of an interactive database measuring the attention devoted to Indigenous matters by federal candidates on social media (PRESS RELEASE)

Cision (Canada): Launch of an interactive database measuring the attention devoted to Indigenous matters by federal candidates on social media (PRESS RELEASE). “Researchers from the Observatoire des administrations publiques autochtones (OAPA) and the Observatoire de la politique et de la sécurité de l’Arctique (OPSA) of ENAP have launched an interactive analysis tool that measures the interest of federal election candidates in Indigenous matters. The interactive tool allows for measuring the level of attention given to these matters, by day, by political party and by riding, among others. Several tools are also available to analyze the type of topics raised and the themes addressed by the candidates.”

Toronto Star: Certain ‘Indian’ day school records off-limits to public while province conducts investigation

Toronto Star: Certain ‘Indian’ day school records off-limits to public while province conducts investigation. “After committing to investigate the history of New Brunswick’s infamous day schools for Indigenous children, the New Brunswick government is now calling on the province’s museum, archives and ‘other institutions’ to make records of the schools available to First Nations communities.” The headline is confusing. What I get from the article is that records are temporarily unavailable while they are being digitized for broader access.

Government of Canada: Library and Archives Canada announces First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation organizations receiving funding through the Listen, Hear our Voices initiative

Government of Canada: Library and Archives Canada announces First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation organizations receiving funding through the Listen, Hear our Voices initiative. “Nineteen (19) Indigenous organizations across the country received funding to digitize and make accessible their existing audio and video heritage for future generations as part of the initiative’s second call for applications, which closed in December 2020. An Indigenous review committee, external to LAC, and consisting of First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation individuals from across Canada reviewed applications and made the following recommendations for funding.”

CBC: Algonquin artist in residence seeks to blur borders of Diefenbunker maps

CBC: Algonquin artist in residence seeks to blur borders of Diefenbunker maps. “As the new artist in residence at Ottawa’s Diefenbunker Museum, Mairi Brascoupé is blending Cold War-era maps and beadwork to explore the idea of ‘place’ during times of change. Brascoupé, a member of Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation, wants to weave her own story by exploring the differences between cultures of Indigenous people and settlers.”

Toronto Star: Local Indigenous archives and language revitalization underway at KFPL

Toronto Star: Local Indigenous archives and language revitalization underway at KFPL. “An initiative to create and digitize an archive of local Indigenous history is in full steam at the Kingston Frontenac Public Library. Danycka Pereault, an Indigenous woman from the Kingston area has recently joined the team responsible for the work thanks to a grant from Young Canada Works and going towards the StoryMe project.”

Saltwire: New Innu language app is another tool in maintaining Indigenous langauge

Saltwire: New Innu language app is another tool in maintaining Indigenous langauge. “A very important part of any culture is language. For many First Nations in Canada maintaining their languages has been difficult, and the Innu are no exception. A new tool recently released, an Innu-aimun conversation app, is part of an effort by the Innu groups of Labrador and Quebec, in conjunction with researchers from Memorial University and Carleton University, to help keep the language alive.”

Borgen Magazine: The Reclaiming of Indigenous Education in Canada

Borgen Magazine: The Reclaiming of Indigenous Education in Canada. “The First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities comprise the Indigenous peoples of what many call present-day Canada. These communities have faced centuries of Western colonialism, which wielded education as a one of its main weapons of domination. This pattern persisted into living memory and continues to negatively impact individuals and their greater communities. Today, reclaiming Indigenous education in Canada is seen as a pivotal step in preserving and recovering what was lost in decades past.”

CBC: Anishinabek Nation’s new interactive online resource teaches students about treaties, rights

CBC: Anishinabek Nation’s new interactive online resource teaches students about treaties, rights. “The Anishnabek Nation in northern Ontario has launched a new online program to help students learn more about First Nations history, treaties and aboriginal rights. The interactive program, which includes videos from elders, is a resource for educators to reach both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students.”

Lethbridge News Now: New tool developed to help preserve the language of Blackfoot

Lethbridge News Now: New tool developed to help preserve the language of Blackfoot. “Eldon Yellowhorn is working hard to preserve the Blackfoot language. Yellowhorn is a professor in the department of Indigenous Studies at Simon Fraser University (SFU). He’s the lead for a team that has developed an online tool to help people learn the language of Blackfoot, as part of the Blackfoot Revitalization Project.”

TimesColonist: First Nations win access to archives of Sisters of St. Ann

TimesColonist: First Nations win access to archives of Sisters of St. Ann. “First Nations have won access to the private archives of the Sisters of St. Ann, an order of Catholic nuns that ran four residential schools, including the Kamloops Indian Residential School. The Royal B.C. Museum said Wednesday it had signed a memorandum of agreement with the Sisters of St. Ann to provide access to the order’s archives to the museum and to the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre at UBC.”

University of Manitoba: NCTR launches a new website and archive database – nctr. ca

University of Manitoba: NCTR launches a new website and archive database – nctr. ca. “The new and improved National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) website and archive database is now live. Some of the NCTR’s most important work is sharing the truth of residential schools and providing Survivors and their families access to their school records. The new, easy-to-navigate website and database ensures we help connect Survivors, Educators, Researchers and those interested in the history of residential schools a comprehensive group of resources. The NCTR holds millions of records, many of which are public records, statements and events available to be explored and understood.”

New York Times: The Plan to Protect Indigenous Elders Living Under the Northern Lights

New York Times: The Plan to Protect Indigenous Elders Living Under the Northern Lights. “In Canada, the first known Covid-19 case arrived on a January 2020 flight from Wuhan, China to Toronto. It was a wake-up call for the country, but especially for Northwest Territories Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Kami Kandola. Several passengers from that Wuhan flight were bound for Yellowknife — tourists eager to marvel at the Northern Lights.”

Macleod Gazette: Project creates digital home for Blackfoot items

Macleod Gazette: Project creates digital home for Blackfoot items. “Mootookakio’ssin, at its simplest description, is a project to create detailed images of historical Blackfoot objects housed in British museums. At its most complex, it is creating a virtual home for Indigenous objects, a place to reactivate the Blackfoot relations within them and transfer that knowledge all the way from Britain back to their peoples in southern Alberta. After two years of research, construction and creation, this collaborative project between University of Lethbridge and UK researchers, led by Blackfoot advisors and elders, is coming to fruition, culminating in presentations, exhibitions, workshops, and the launch of the digital object microsite in summer 2021, to be housed in the Blackfoot Digital Library.”

Library and Archives Canada: A new Google map to search for Indigenous-related collection items

Thanks to Paul P. for the heads-up! Library and Archives Canada: A new Google map to search for Indigenous-related collection items. “Over the past three years, We Are Here: Sharing Stories has digitized and described over 590,000 images of archival and published materials related to First Nations, Inuit and the Métis Nation….In order to make it easier to locate recently digitized Indigenous heritage content at LAC, we have created a searchable list of the collections and introduced a Google map feature – allowing users to browse archival materials by geographic region!”