The Atlantic: The Online Gig Economy’s ‘Race to the Bottom’

The Atlantic: The Online Gig Economy’s ‘Race to the Bottom’. “You can buy almost any thing you want online—toothpaste, books, plastic devices that allow you to lick your cat. On digital work platforms like Upwork, Fiverr, and Freelancer.com, you can also buy nearly any service—often from someone halfway around the world, sometimes for just a few bucks. On Fiverr, one of the most popular of these platforms, you’ll find offers for someone who will write an e-book ‘on any topic’; a person who will perform ‘a Voiceover as Bernie Sanders’; someone who will write your Tinder profile for you, and someone who will design a logo for your real-estate company. The people selling this labor live in Nigeria, Mexico, the United Kingdom, and Bangladesh, respectively. Each of them charge $5 for these tasks.”

Bots Are Taking Over: Fiverr Adds Subcategory Dedicated to Chatbots Development Gigs (Small Business Trends)

Small Business Trends: Bots Are Taking Over: Fiverr Adds Subcategory Dedicated to Chatbots Development Gigs. “The attack of the bots continues as they spread their reach everywhere from data gathering, to analytics, web indexing and more, automating tasks across the internet. And now it’s easier than ever to create your own bot. Freelance marketplace Fiverr has a new subcategory dedicated to chatbots development services.” Adding this is a data point about the proliferation of chatbots, not because I think everyone should rush to Fiverr.

The Next Web: Astroturfing Reddit is the future of political campaigning

The Next Web: Astroturfing Reddit is the future of political campaigning. “Earlier this year, Hack PR had a problem. The unorthodox public relations firm had snapped up a new client, a deep-pocketed entrepreneur with political ambitions. Unfortunately, nobody really knew who he was, and the campaign it launched for him failed to convert into any real coverage save for a couple of pieces in the Huffington Post and The Washington Times. They needed another idea. So, in their words, they hustled.”

Amazon Sues Fake Fiverr Reviewers

Amazon has filed suit against individuals offering fake product reviews on Fiverr. “The defendants in the new case, listed as ‘John Does,’ each used Fiverr.com to sell fake positive or 5-star Amazon reviews. In some cases, they even offered ‘verified’ reviews, meaning those where they buy the product – provided they’re compensated for that, of course. Other times, they also tell the purchaser to just provide the product review and they’ll post it.”