ABC News (Australia): Murray River flood photos on social media to help create archive for future planning

ABC News (Australia): Murray River flood photos on social media to help create archive for future planning. “When water levels along the South Australian stretch of the river started increasing in mid-to-late 2022, so too did the number of photographs capturing the changing landscape. Multiple social media pages dedicated to sharing visual updates of floodwaters have gained thousands of audience members far and wide.”

City University of New York: New Data Dashboard Reporting Street-level Flooding In NYC Gives Government, Responders, The Public, And Researchers Real-time Information On Rising Waters

City University of New York: New Data Dashboard Reporting Street-level Flooding In NYC Gives Government, Responders, The Public, And Researchers Real-time Information On Rising Waters. “Created in partnership with FieldKit, with funding from the New York State Empire State Development Corporation, the new mobile-ready web dashboard presents real-time data collected by the expanding FloodNet system of low-cost, open-source sensors in flood-prone areas across the city. Currently, FloodNet comprises 30 ultrasonic devices deployed in Brooklyn, the Bronx, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island, from which readings are delivered to an interactive map and data visualization platform, allowing users to see the occurrence and depth of flood water at each sensor location.”

Lexington Herald-Leader: ‘We could lose history.’ Appalachian archives soaked in record Kentucky flooding.

Lexington Herald-Leader: ‘We could lose history.’ Appalachian archives soaked in record Kentucky flooding. . “A good bit of Appalachian history and arts got soaked in the record flooding in Eastern Kentucky. In Whitesburg, water may have breached the vault at Appalshop, where the arts and media collective stored more than 20,000 items, including decades worth of film, oral histories, videotapes of musical performances, photo collections and other records.”

The Conversation: Rivers can suddenly change course – scientists used 50 years of satellite images to learn where and how it happens

The Conversation: Rivers can suddenly change course – scientists used 50 years of satellite images to learn where and how it happens. “Throughout history, important cities around the world have flourished along river banks. But rivers can also be destructive forces. They routinely flood, and on rare occasions, they can abruptly shift pathways. These ‘channel-jumping’ events, which are called avulsions, have caused some of the deadliest floods in human history…. In a newly published study, I worked with colleagues to map the global distribution of avulsions on river fans and deltas. We used satellite images of over 100 rivers from 1973 to the present, providing a half-century of bird’s-eye views of global river evolution.”

Agência FAPESP: Smartphone app helps communities monitor floods and supplies data for disaster prevention

Agência FAPESP: Smartphone app helps communities monitor floods and supplies data for disaster prevention. “A smartphone app could change the way communities and governments deal with floods. People living in flood-prone areas can use it to receive early warnings and help the authorities with disaster prevention by contributing to the identification of high-risk areas.”

NoCamels: Israeli Company That Developed AI Lifeguard Now Predicts Dangerous Flooding

NoCamels: Israeli Company That Developed AI Lifeguard Now Predicts Dangerous Flooding. “It’s hard to imagine with all the rain and sleet and snow this month in various parts of the world that spring and summer are just around the corner. Sightbit, the Israeli startup leveraging AI to alert lifeguards when swimmers are in danger, is ready, with its life-saving, preventative drowning tech already implemented and operating at full capacity at beaches throughout Israel, Europe, and the US. Along the way, the Beersheba-based company has received requests from some of the same customers that use its AI tech to come up with a way to deal with aquatic environments and situations, including floods.”

Georgetown Voice: Smithsonian museums struggle to keep national treasure above water

Georgetown Voice: Smithsonian museums struggle to keep national treasure above water. “Many of the museums built on the Mall have experienced major flooding events, threatening collections stored onsite below ground level and even galleries. As a warming climate is projected to cause further sea level rise and increase the incidence of extreme weather events—major floods have doubled in the past few decades—these institutions face new collection conservation and museum sustainability challenges. The scale of the threat becomes apparent when considering the size of the 19 Smithsonian institutions and their combined collections of 155 million objects.”

Rossland News: Grand Forks man building archive of neighbourhood lost to flood

Rossland News: Grand Forks man building archive of neighbourhood lost to flood. This is Grand Forks, British Columbia, not North Dakota. “A Grand Forks man is compiling a digital archive of North Ruckle in a bid to preserve the flood-ravaged neighbourhood’s history. Les Johnson, an accomplished videographer and active member of the Boundary Historical Society, said he started the project in the spring of 2021, roughly six months before demolition started at neighbourhood homes in the way of the North Ruckle Dike.”

WBIW: New Indiana Floodplain Information Portal now available

WBIW: New Indiana Floodplain Information Portal now available. “A new Indiana Floodplain Information Portal (INFIP) is available that will save users valuable time. INFIP is designed to show flood risk associated with Indiana water bodies and provide information specifically for local and state floodplain permitting. The information is based on the regulatory floodplain limits, as floods exceeding the regulatory floodplain can and do occur.”

AXA XL: AXA XL launches new Coastal Risk Index

AXA XL: AXA XL launches new Coastal Risk Index. “The CRI has been developed in partnership with AXA’s scientific partners, IHE Delft (Netherlands) and University of California, Santa Cruz (USA) and the Government of Canada through the Ocean Risk and Resilience Action Alliance (ORRAA). It assesses coastal flooding in the context of climate change by comparing scenarios with and without coastal ecosystems, such as coral reefs and mangroves, helping to build the case for nature-based solutions.”