PR Newswire: First Street Foundation releases new data disclosing the flood risk of every home in the contiguous U.S. (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: First Street Foundation releases new data disclosing the flood risk of every home in the contiguous U.S. (PRESS RELEASE). “The nonprofit research and technology group First Street Foundation has publicly released flood risk data for more than 142 million homes and properties across the country. The data, based on decades of peer-reviewed research, assigns every property in the contiguous United States a “Flood Factor™,” or score from 1 to 10, based on its cumulative risk of flooding over a thirty-year mortgage. People can look up a property’s Flood Factor and learn more about its past, present, and future flood risk at FloodFactor.com, the Foundation’s new online visualization tool, launching today.” When I was playing with this, I found that it would work for a couple of lookups and then start giving me 404 errors as I was putting in a new address. If I reopened the link in an incognito window it worked fine again for a couple of lookups.

Phys .org: Brazilian communities fight floods together – with memories and an app

Phys .org: Brazilian communities fight floods together – with memories and an app. “Brazilian communities that are vulnerable to devastating floods are being united and empowered to defend themselves, using ‘citizen science’ and a specially developed mobile app, thanks to two research projects led by the University of Warwick.”

Asahi Shimbun: Tottori to provide flood estimates using Google Street View

Asahi Shimbun: Tottori to provide flood estimates using Google Street View. “The Street View feature on Google Maps enables users to see landscapes and scenery on the maps. Under the prefecture’s system using special software, residents can experience flooding in a more realistic fashion and become more aware of the need to plan anti-disaster measures, the officials said. Essentially, they will be able to pick evacuation routes in a more simplified way than using the current hazard maps.”

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: New online database to give homebuyers detailed information about flood risks

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: New online database to give homebuyers detailed information about flood risks. “First Street Foundation on Tuesday launched Flood Lab, a research partnership which provides eight universities with its model that maps previous instances of flooding as well as future risks. Using the dataset, Wharton, MIT and John Hopkins University among others will quantify the impacts of flooding on the U.S. economy….The data will be made available to the public in the first half of 2020 in an online database searchable by home address.”

KX Net: State Flood Risk Map Now Available To Residents

KX Net: State Flood Risk Map Now Available To Residents.”The North Dakota Water Commission recently unveiled a new interactive map you can check out before the water starts to rise. Officially called the North Dakota Risk Assessment Map service, the new, free tool will show users flood depths, surface elevations as well as scenarios for 100-and 500-year floods.”

Nature: A global database of historic and real-time flood events based on social media

Nature: A global database of historic and real-time flood events based on social media. “Early event detection and response can significantly reduce the societal impact of floods. Currently, early warning systems rely on gauges, radar data, models and informal local sources. However, the scope and reliability of these systems are limited. Recently, the use of social media for detecting disasters has shown promising results, especially for earthquakes. Here, we present a new database for detecting floods in real-time on a global scale using Twitter.”

Deep data: Oregon offers new online resource for potential flooding around the state (Register-Guard)

Register-Guard: Deep data: Oregon offers new online resource for potential flooding around the state. “Riverside property owners, anglers and others with interest in stream levels around Oregon have a new way to check for potential flooding. The Oregon Office of Emergency Management last month released a new online dashboard. The tool includes an interactive map and a list of how many stream gauges are expected to be nearing flood stage, or have minor flooding, moderate flooding or major flooding. As of early this week, no gauges around Oregon indicated flooding.”

The Indian Express: Google now ready to give public ‘flood alerts’

The Indian Express: Google now ready to give public ‘flood alerts’. “Tech giant Google is scaling up its learnings from a pilot project in Patna to provide flood alerts in simple text format to people in many parts of the country using sophisticated machine learning techniques. The Union Ministry of Water Resources provides Google with data on river water levels for preparing such public alerts.”

What data teaches about flood forecasting: NAU researcher co-leading crowdsourced app to gauge flood water (Northern Arizona University)

Northern Arizona University: What data teaches about flood forecasting: NAU researcher co-leading crowdsourced app to gauge flood water . “A new project funded by a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation is designed to address this problem. Along with collaborators at Arizona State University, the University of Arizona, University at Buffalo and Michigan Technological University, Ruddell will partner with local, federal and academic stakeholders to pilot a new flood information system for cities that connects first responders, citizens and infrastructure professionals with exactly the flood information they need, in near-real time, for the locations where they need this data most.”

State Library of Queensland: Footage Of The Maryborough Floods Of 1955

State Library of Queensland (Australia): Footage Of The Maryborough Floods Of 1955. “A series of short films made by amateur filmmaker Bill Rahmann have been digitised by State Library of Queensland and made available online. One of these films focuses on the Maryborough floods during March of 1955, following Cyclone Bertha.”

India Today: Google Maps ‘plus code’ is allowing Kerala flood victims to share their exact location even without internet

India Today: Google Maps ‘plus code’ is allowing Kerala flood victims to share their exact location even without internet. “In a statement released by Google on Saturday, it was revealed that Kerala flood victims can now use their Android smartphones or tablets to generate and share the plus code of their exact location, which can pinpoint their whereabouts and make it easier for rescue workers to reach them.”

Zee Business: Google to help govt in flood management across the country

Zee Business: Google to help govt in flood management across the country. “The government will team up with the global technology major Google for effective flood management in India. Union Minister for Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation Nitin Gadkari said that collaboration with Google will help in better flood management in the country. Central Water Commission (CWC), India’s apex technical organisation in the field of Water Resources, has entered into a collaboration agreement with Google. CWC would use state-of-the-art advances made by Google in the in the field of Artificial Intelligence, machine learning and geo-spatial mapping for effective management of water resources particularly in the field of flood forecast and dissemination of flood-related information to the masses, a Water Resources ministry statement said.”

WUSF: USF Students Create A Website That Shows Homeowners Their Flood Risk

WUSF: USF Students Create A Website That Shows Homeowners Their Flood Risk. “One thing would-be homeowners in Florida have to worry about is if their potential property might be affected by flooding in a hurricane. Now, a pair of USF graduate students have created a database that helps tell people if that might be the case.”

USGS: USGS Tracks How Hurricane Floodwaters Spread Non-Native Freshwater Plants and Animals

USGS: USGS Tracks How Hurricane Floodwaters Spread Non-Native Freshwater Plants and Animals. “Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Maria, and Nate may have spread non-native freshwater plants and animals into new water bodies, where some of them can disrupt living communities or change the landscape. To help land managers find and manage these flood-borne newcomers, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey have created four online maps, one for each hurricane.”

Scroll.in: How social media showed its unique power of crowdsourcing during the Chennai floods

Scroll.in: How social media showed its unique power of crowdsourcing during the Chennai floods. “One ingenious resource that was circulated widely during the floods was a crowdsourced effort that mapped inundated roads in the city. Over 2,500 flooded roads were added to the city’s map via social media, which was put together by engineer and information designer, Arun Ganesh. The Chennai floods were a superb example of the power of collective effort. Users across social media channels came together to offer shelter, food, transport, and even a place for people to charge their phones. SOS messages asking ground teams to rescue stranded family members also went back and forth, and there were many who offered their homes and offices to those who were stranded.”