USA Today: Flood-prone homeowners could see major rate hikes in FEMA flood insurance changes, new study finds

USA Today: Flood-prone homeowners could see major rate hikes in FEMA flood insurance changes, new study finds. “The First Street Foundation calculated ZIP code-level averages of the financial toll of flood damage by collecting home values and structural information for every single-family and small multi-unit dwelling in the nation and applying it to its previously published flood model with damage formulas. First Street calculated its figures for about 26,000 ZIP codes in the lower 48 states and D.C. ZIP codes without data are not included.”

Bloomberg Quint: A New Tool Tracks Flooded Homes Receiving Taxpayer Money

Bloomberg Quint: A New Tool Tracks Flooded Homes Receiving Taxpayer Money. “Passaic County in New Jersey is not in the hurricane belt nor is it on the banks of a major river, and yet 810 properties there received $170 million of taxpayer money through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) since 1968. These are homes that flooded over and over again; on average, each has made seven separate flood claims over the years. That finding comes from a newly released tracking tool by the Natural Resources Defense Council, making public for the first time a data set of all Severe Repetitive Loss Properties (SRLP) across the nation by county.”

BBC: Coronavirus restrictions ‘severely hampering’ South Asia flood relief

BBC: Coronavirus restrictions ‘severely hampering’ South Asia flood relief. “Humanitarian agencies say Covid-19 restrictions have severely hampered and slowed down relief operations in many places hit by Monsoon floods and landslides across South Asia. Relief workers have been restricted in their movements by localised lockdowns, while stocks of emergency supplies have been rendered inaccessible by strict containment zones.”

PR Newswire: First Street Foundation releases new data disclosing the flood risk of every home in the contiguous U.S. (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: First Street Foundation releases new data disclosing the flood risk of every home in the contiguous U.S. (PRESS RELEASE). “The nonprofit research and technology group First Street Foundation has publicly released flood risk data for more than 142 million homes and properties across the country. The data, based on decades of peer-reviewed research, assigns every property in the contiguous United States a “Flood Factor™,” or score from 1 to 10, based on its cumulative risk of flooding over a thirty-year mortgage. People can look up a property’s Flood Factor and learn more about its past, present, and future flood risk at FloodFactor.com, the Foundation’s new online visualization tool, launching today.” When I was playing with this, I found that it would work for a couple of lookups and then start giving me 404 errors as I was putting in a new address. If I reopened the link in […]

Asahi Shimbun: Tottori to provide flood estimates using Google Street View

Asahi Shimbun: Tottori to provide flood estimates using Google Street View. “The Street View feature on Google Maps enables users to see landscapes and scenery on the maps. Under the prefecture’s system using special software, residents can experience flooding in a more realistic fashion and become more aware of the need to plan anti-disaster measures, the officials said. Essentially, they will be able to pick evacuation routes in a more simplified way than using the current hazard maps.”

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: New online database to give homebuyers detailed information about flood risks

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: New online database to give homebuyers detailed information about flood risks. “First Street Foundation on Tuesday launched Flood Lab, a research partnership which provides eight universities with its model that maps previous instances of flooding as well as future risks. Using the dataset, Wharton, MIT and John Hopkins University among others will quantify the impacts of flooding on the U.S. economy….The data will be made available to the public in the first half of 2020 in an online database searchable by home address.”

KX Net: State Flood Risk Map Now Available To Residents

KX Net: State Flood Risk Map Now Available To Residents.”The North Dakota Water Commission recently unveiled a new interactive map you can check out before the water starts to rise. Officially called the North Dakota Risk Assessment Map service, the new, free tool will show users flood depths, surface elevations as well as scenarios for 100-and 500-year floods.”

Nature: A global database of historic and real-time flood events based on social media

Nature: A global database of historic and real-time flood events based on social media. “Early event detection and response can significantly reduce the societal impact of floods. Currently, early warning systems rely on gauges, radar data, models and informal local sources. However, the scope and reliability of these systems are limited. Recently, the use of social media for detecting disasters has shown promising results, especially for earthquakes. Here, we present a new database for detecting floods in real-time on a global scale using Twitter.”

Deep data: Oregon offers new online resource for potential flooding around the state (Register-Guard)

Register-Guard: Deep data: Oregon offers new online resource for potential flooding around the state. “Riverside property owners, anglers and others with interest in stream levels around Oregon have a new way to check for potential flooding. The Oregon Office of Emergency Management last month released a new online dashboard. The tool includes an interactive map and a list of how many stream gauges are expected to be nearing flood stage, or have minor flooding, moderate flooding or major flooding. As of early this week, no gauges around Oregon indicated flooding.”

The Indian Express: Google now ready to give public ‘flood alerts’

The Indian Express: Google now ready to give public ‘flood alerts’. “Tech giant Google is scaling up its learnings from a pilot project in Patna to provide flood alerts in simple text format to people in many parts of the country using sophisticated machine learning techniques. The Union Ministry of Water Resources provides Google with data on river water levels for preparing such public alerts.”

What data teaches about flood forecasting: NAU researcher co-leading crowdsourced app to gauge flood water (Northern Arizona University)

Northern Arizona University: What data teaches about flood forecasting: NAU researcher co-leading crowdsourced app to gauge flood water . “A new project funded by a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation is designed to address this problem. Along with collaborators at Arizona State University, the University of Arizona, University at Buffalo and Michigan Technological University, Ruddell will partner with local, federal and academic stakeholders to pilot a new flood information system for cities that connects first responders, citizens and infrastructure professionals with exactly the flood information they need, in near-real time, for the locations where they need this data most.”