St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Missouri Botanical Garden’s plant collection is going digital

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Missouri Botanical Garden’s plant collection is going digital. “The Missouri Botanical Garden, in the middle of a multiyear effort to digitize hundreds of thousands of dried plant specimens, is now on the edge of further expanding its work. The Garden is hopeful it will soon land a grant from the National Science Foundation to digitally catalogue more than half a million specimens in its Africa collection to an online database for researchers around the world.”

Log Cabin Democrat: Arkansas plant health clinic’s updated plant disease image database now available

Log Cabin Democrat: Arkansas plant health clinic’s updated plant disease image database now available. “For Arkansas growers, gardeners, and homeowners, the ability to identify plant health issues is critical to the success of their crop. The Arkansas Plant Health Clinic, located in Fayetteville and supported by the Cooperative Extension Service, serves these growers by providing resources to help solve plant disease problems. The clinic’s Plant Disease Image Database, an online image library that lists hundreds of plant diseases, has been recently updated by the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture’s Information Technology department. The database is now available on mobile devices.”

Phys .org: Visually stunning tree of all known life unveiled online

Phys .org: Visually stunning tree of all known life unveiled online. “The OneZoom explorer… maps the connections between 2.2 million living species, the closest thing yet to a single view of all species known to science. The interactive tree of life allows users to zoom in to any species and explore its relationships with others, in a seamless visualisation on a single web page. The explorer also includes images of over 85,000 species, plus, where known, their vulnerability to extinction.”

ABC News (Australia): Race to save frogs, quokkas, parrots and koalas from extinction helped by new threat database

ABC News (Australia): Race to save frogs, quokkas, parrots and koalas from extinction helped by new threat database . “Researchers across Australia have spent 18 months forming the database of threats forcing species to the brink of extinction. The list of more than 1,700 species was done to help wildlife warriors and organisations stop foreshadowed declines in flora and fauna populations, and even possible extinctions.”

University of Alabama at Birmingham: Plant AI project aims to bring food to tables and students into science

University of Alabama at Birmingham: Plant AI project aims to bring food to tables and students into science. “With a new four-year, $1 million-plus grant from the National Science Foundation, [Shahid] Mukhtar and his research partner and wife, Karolina Mukhtar, Ph.D., associate professor and associate chair in the biology department, are doing something big. The researchers are using machine learning and other high-tech approaches to identify fresh ways to squeeze extra growing power out of the world’s crops.”

American Botanical Council: Nonprofit American Botanical Council Launches New, More Powerful Website

American Botanical Council: Nonprofit American Botanical Council Launches New, More Powerful Website. “As part of the tax-exempt nonprofit’s ongoing research and educational mission and commitment to provide ABC Members around the world with reliable, authoritative science-based and traditional-use information on herbs, phytomedicines, essential oils, medicinal fungi, and other beneficial botanicals, ABC has spent the last two years building a new website to improve the user experience for ABC members and other website visitors.”

Montsame: Online database for Mongolian flora to be established

Montsame: Online database for Mongolian flora to be established. “Currently, there are two herbaria in Mongolia: the herbarium of the Botanic Garden and Research Institute of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences (UBA) with 80 thousand pages, and the herbarium of the Faculty of Biology at the National University of Mongolia (UBU) with 20 thousand pages. By digitizing the herbaria as according to internationally accepted standards and creating the online database, it will become possible for the highly valuable materials about the flora diversity of Mongolia to be kept safe.”

Wyoming Public Media: University Of Wyoming Team Creates Database Of Worldwide Vegetation

Wyoming Public Media: University Of Wyoming Team Creates Database Of Worldwide Vegetation. “When University of Wyoming Department of Botany Associate Professor Daniel Laughlin realized he would have to teach ecology online for the fall semester, he started searching for a resource to show his students landscapes from afar. When he didn’t find what he was looking for, Laughlin and his graduate students designed the Global Vegetation Project.”

Leiden University: New database reveals plants’ secret relationships with fungi

Leiden University: New database reveals plants’ secret relationships with fungi. “Almost all vascular plants have a relationship with a fungus in their roots that allow them to obtain nutrients from the soil. This relationship, called mycorrhiza, is symbiotic, since the fungi too benefit from it. It is so important that most plant species would not be able survive without it. Until now, information on this symbiotic relationship has been scattered throughout myriad scientific publications.”

Mongabay: New assessment method finds close to one-third of tropical Africa’s plants are potentially facing extinction

Mongabay: New assessment method finds close to one-third of tropical Africa’s plants are potentially facing extinction . “New research finds that nearly one-third — 31.7 percent — of tropical Africa’s vascular plant species might be at risk of going extinct. The International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species is the go-to resource for conservation status assessments, but while the majority of vertebrate species have been assessed, we know far less about the conservation status of plants, especially in the tropics.”

Computing: Kew Gardens plans to digitise and release Darwin’s data

Computing: Kew Gardens plans to digitise and release Darwin’s data . “Kew Gardens is planning to implement an integrated collections management system to unify its disparate databases and make their data available to the world. Whilst most think of the sculpted gardens when they think of Kew, and as a plot of land which is home to over 30,000 trees that’s unsurprising, most are unaware that it’s also a centre of scientific research, and home to the world’s most extensive botanic collections.”

CBC: Research, photos of Manitoba tundra open to public

CBC: Research, photos of Manitoba tundra open to public. “An archive of photos and research of plants and animals in Manitoba’s tundra are now available online, providing public access to decades of Churchill, Man., history. Professors from York University in Toronto are in the town 1,000 kilometres north of Winnipeg this week to share the Churchill Community of Knowledge — a digital archive that more than 50 York University students have been putting together since 2011.”

Phys .org: Scientists use machine-learning algorithms to help automate plant studies

Phys .org: Scientists use machine-learning algorithms to help automate plant studies. “Father of genetics Gregor Mendel spent years tediously observing and measuring pea plant traits by hand in the 1800s to uncover the basics of genetic inheritance. Today, botanists can track the traits, or phenotypes, of hundreds or thousands of plants much more quickly, with automated camera systems. Now, Salk researchers have helped speed up plant phenotyping even more, with machine-learning algorithms that teach a computer system to analyze three-dimensional shapes of the branches and leaves of a plant.”

Natural History of Ecological Restoration: Desert Trees of the World – A new database for ecological restoration

Natural History of Ecological Restoration: Desert Trees of the World – A new database for ecological restoration. “Desert Trees of the World represents a multi-purpose, participatory database in which we have gathered a vast array of information about dryland trees, where and how they live, the communities they are part of, the many ways in which they are used by people, and some elements about their successful cultivation.”