Florida Memory Launches New Online Collection of Citrus Fruit Crate Labels

Florida Memory has launched a new collection of citrus fruit crate labels. From the collection page: “Most of the labels in this collection advertise citrus fruits, but corn, celery, cucumbers, cabbage, avocados and other fruits and vegetables are also represented. The labels range in size from the standard 9-inch square label that was placed at the indented end of a wooden shipping crate, to the 6-inch square and 3-by-9-inch labels that were used for half boxes and gift boxes.” There are over 600 labels in the collection. If you’re interested in advertising / graphic design, take a glance.

Sunshine State Digital Network: SSDN Welcomes Florida Memory

Sunshine State Digital Network: SSDN Welcomes Florida Memory. “Florida’s Sunshine State Digital Network (SSDN) is pleased to announce that more than 62,000 new records from Florida Memory are now discoverable through the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). Florida Memory is a digital outreach program of the State Library and Archives of Florida, administered by the Florida Department of State’s Division of Library and Information Services. With this new content, SSDN has now contributed more than 148,000 records to DPLA. This expands the network of people, communities, and stories that we represent and can share with you, our community.”

News-Press: Relive old Florida through FGCU’s oral histories digital collection

News-Press: Relive old Florida through FGCU’s oral histories digital collection. “Oral histories have long been a trove of fascinating information for historians and researchers, but accessing those histories can be difficult. Many oral narratives are collected by small local museums or community organizations, and they’re often recorded on cassette tapes. This means the oral narratives are only available to those who are willing to make the trek to listen in person. But [Florida Gulf Coast University] has been collecting these histories and digitizing them, turning the oral narratives into online files that are accessible to the public.”

Miami Herald: Talk host Neil Rogers is dead, but his radio archive lives on

New-to-me, from the Miami Herald: Talk host Neil Rogers is dead, but his radio archive lives on. “Legendary radio host Neil Rogers died of congestive heart failure in Broward County on Christmas Eve 2010. But he’s alive and well on Michael Allen Smith’s… website that allows free access to 1,900 Rogers shows — more than 4,500 hours of broadcasts spanning 25 years. For good measure, Smith added 300 ‘drops,’ seconds-long bits that Rogers sprinkled on his audience, including ‘Neil God,’ ‘It’s Friday, you bastards’ and ‘Floridians, dumb as dirt.'”

Hyperallergic: A Portrait of Black Life in Florida, One Neighborhood at a Time

Hyperallergic: A Portrait of Black Life in Florida, One Neighborhood at a Time. “In one of the many photographs that Johanne Rahaman took in Perrine, Florida as part of her Black Florida series, a woman gazes into the distance, bedecked in a blue, green, and red dress. Parts of it are so fluorescent they seem lit from within; the woman holds a certificate from her alma mater, Hastings Colored Vocational Training School. There’s something subtly regal about the shot: the woman’s steady gaze, the marble coffee table at her side, the plush red chair she’s sitting on. In one image alone, Rahaman captures both the history of segregation and the day-to-day experience of someone who lived through it, a stately woman who appears throughout the series, speaking and gesturing with her hands.”

Unveiling of La Florida: The Interactive Digital Archive of the Americas to Revolutionize Early American History (University of South Florida)

University of South Florida: Unveiling of La Florida: The Interactive Digital Archive of the Americas to Revolutionize Early American History. “Through short videos, interactive maps and digital reconstructions, La Florida brings to life the diverse melting pot of people that made up early Spanish Florida, from Spanish conquistadors and Native Americans to free and enslaved blacks and Europeans from Germany, Ireland and Eastern Europe. It weaves together in fascinating detail the lives and critical events of America’s earliest beginnings – such as the founding of the first permanent European settlement in the continental U.S. at St. Augustine in 1565; the original St. Patrick’s day celebration that was discovered through this project to have taken place in Florida in 1601; and the first free black settlement anywhere in the colonies at Fort Mose in 1738.”