Smithsonian Magazine: Shuttered Museums Use Social Media to Share Bouquets of Floral Artwork

Smithsonian Magazine: Shuttered Museums Use Social Media to Share Bouquets of Floral Artwork. “Last week, museums started showing love to one another by posting photos of floral artwork labeled with the hashtag #MuseumBouquet, reports Noor Brara for artnet News. The New-York Historical Society and the Smithsonian Institution’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden kicked off the trend by sending digital bouquets to other art institutions. The former shared its first petaled missive—a cluster of apple blossoms painted by American artist Martin Johnson Heade—with the Smithsonian American Art Museum, while the latter sent Tate Britain ‘a little cheer’ in the form of an Andy Warhol bouquet.”

Beauty in grief: Durham woman creates 100 days of art from her mother’s funeral flowers (WRAL)

WRAL: Beauty in grief: Durham woman creates 100 days of art from her mother’s funeral flowers. “When Janet Willis’ mom passed away from small cell lung cancer in her 70s, Willis said she felt like she lost more than a mother; she lost a piece of herself. The loss launched her on a 100 day journey, creating art with the dried flower petals saved from her mother’s funeral and sharing her grief experience with her followers.” If the grief wasn’t so overt, you could call her illustrations whimsical. Instead they’re almost unbearably tender. Reminds me a little of Leo Lionni. She’s created an Instagram to share her work.

Xinhua: China launches online database on camellia varieties

Xinhua: China launches online database on camellia varieties. “The database has more than 45,000 names and 33,000 pictures of camellia varieties including ornamental, tea and oil species. Users can search the name of camellia varieties in different languages including English, Chinese and Japanese.” Unfortunately the story does not have a link to the database, which is here: http://camellia.iflora.cn/ .

Chelsea Flower Show 2019: RHS and Google launch new online exhibition (House Beautiful)

House Beautiful: Chelsea Flower Show 2019: RHS and Google launch new online exhibition. “You may not have managed to get your hands on a ticket to the prestigious RHS Chelsea Flower Show this year, but Google’s digital exhibition gives everyone the chance to learn about its history. Showcasing a unique collection of paintings, illustrations, images and original posters, the exhibit delves deep into the changing face of the world’s greatest flower show, starting at the very beginning.”

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: New Carnegie Museum app shows threat to wildflower diversity in the woods

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: New Carnegie Museum app shows threat to wildflower diversity in the woods. “Hikers and hunters have already seen changes in the woodlands of Appalachia in recent years, as deer overpopulation literally nibbles away at the many plant species that live under the trees. A collaboration of science and new media experts has introduced a new tool for the Carnegie Museum of Natural History to educate people about the state of nature and inspire them as well. The tool is an app for smartphones and tablets, called AR Perpetual Garden, that gives even armchair nature lovers a way to compare two scenarios: the woodlands blooming with native wildflowers and the same scene stripped of botanical diversity because of too many deer.”

Smithsonian Insider: See thousands of orchids in incredible detail in the Smithsonian’s newly digitized collection

Smithsonian Insider: See thousands of orchids in incredible detail in the Smithsonian’s newly digitized collection. “More than 8,000 living specimens in the Smithsonian Gardens Orchid Collection have been digitized and are now available to see and study from anywhere in the world. The Smithsonian’s Mass Digitization Program, in association with the National Collections Program, started photographing the plants in December 2017 and recently put the complete collection online.”

ABC News (Australia): Preserving the Earth and a tulip farming legacy with social media

ABC News (Australia): Preserving the Earth and a tulip farming legacy with social media. “This 21st century farmer is using the internet like a farmer’s favourite tool, tapping into a wealth of information on social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook. ‘Through social media now you can connect with farmers all over the world, everyone is so helpful and you get pushed along by these other people, embracing what is really new … just by engaging you end up getting lots of feedback and lots of interest in what you’re doing,’ [Dave Roberts-Thomson] said.”