Laughing Squid: Bionic Reading, A New Reading Method That Stresses Letters Within Words to Let the Brain Fill in the Rest

Laughing Squid: Bionic Reading, A New Reading Method That Stresses Letters Within Words to Let the Brain Fill in the Rest. “Swiss typographic designer Renato Casutt has developed Bionic Reading, a new reading method that artificially emphasizes important letters of a written word and lets the brain fill in the rest. This method allows for deeper understanding with less concentration.” I have been using this with a social network I’m on. It doesn’t do much for me but I read pretty fast to start with. It’s not unpleasant.

The Verge: Google’s latest Roboto variant is a font customizable to its core

The Verge: Google’s latest Roboto variant is a font customizable to its core. “As someone who is really into fonts, I know that most people don’t share my passion — but I genuinely think that anyone who cares at all about typography will have some interest in what Google announced on Thursday. If you’ve ever used anything made by Google, you’ve seen Roboto. Now, Google’s introducing something called Roboto Flex. As the name implies, it’s a version of its famous font that you can tweak and customize in a ton of ways.”

Fast Company: Are some fonts ageist?

Fast Company: Are some fonts ageist? . “If you’re of a certain age, you might have noticed that you no longer read as quickly as you once did. This may be due to vision loss or cognitive changes. Or it might be due to something else: ageist fonts. A major new study has found that fonts matter in determining how quickly a person is able to read on screens. But they matter more if you’re over 35.”

MakeUseOf: 6 Font Size Calculators for Better Messages

MakeUseOf: 6 Font Size Calculators for Better Messages. “When the message of your next presentation is clear, the one thing that shouldn’t be holding you back from sending across your message is typography, or font size. The difference between designs that stand out on the web and the ones that don’t is simple. The ones that stand out have the right font size, font style, and line height. But, how do you know what works and what doesn’t?”

New York Times: Is This Some Kind of Code? You Can Solve the …

New York Times: Is This Some Kind of Code? You Can Solve the …. “In a 2015 paper, ‘Fun With Fonts: Algorithmic Typography,’ the Demaines explained their motivations: ‘Scientists use fonts every day to express their research through the written word. But what if the font itself communicated (the spirit of) the research? What if the way text is written, and not just the text itself, engages the reader in the science?’ Inspired by theorems or open problems, the fonts — and the messages they compose — can usually be read only after solving the related puzzle or series of puzzles.”

Make Tech Easier: 6 Useful Tools to Help You Identify Fonts in Images

Make Tech Easier: 6 Useful Tools to Help You Identify Fonts in Images. “You come across an endless amount of images with text on them. Those images could be advertising or something else. Either way, it’s nothing out of the ordinary to see a font that you want on a picture. The only problem is that you have no idea what that font is called. To help you out, there are various free tools you can use to identify that font. With the following apps, you’ll always be able to identify a font.”

Fast Company: These are the world’s most sustainable fonts

Fast Company: These are the world’s most sustainable fonts. “You probably haven’t thought about whether some websites can be more sustainable than others, but in fact, web design choices can affect how much energy the site uses. In this case, the Formafantasma team made visual choices that had a direct effect on the site’s sustainability. They didn’t just choose Times New Roman and Arial because they liked them, but because they’re standard default typefaces—and therefore, the most sustainable typefaces on the web.”

Domestika: This Digital Archive Is a Treasure Chest of Typography and Design

Domestika: This Digital Archive Is a Treasure Chest of Typography and Design. “The TM Research Archive is a website created by a Swiss student, called Louise Paradis, as her final project for her master’s degree. It compiles information about and images from Typographische Monatsblätter, dating between the 1970s and 1990s. It is a treasure chest filled to the brim with dozens of covers, indexes from different issues, and detailed biographies of its most prominent designers and typographers.”

Hongkiat: 100 Free Fonts for Commercial and Personal Use

Hongkiat: 100 Free Fonts for Commercial and Personal Use. “Each time a designer starts work on a new design, there is always a big problem: a lack of high-quality materials, such as fonts, icons, images etc. Of course, you can create a font that will properly fit the design you created, but it’s not a good idea since font creation takes a lot of time, which is never enough when you have to work within a deadline. The solution is simple: you can use ready-made free fonts. There are tons of them all over the web, and we have but collected a small group of 100 free fronts you can download here.”

San Francisco Chronicle: Letterform Archive makes striking typefaces available to public with online archive

San Francisco Chronicle: Letterform Archive makes striking typefaces available to public with online archive. “So far, 1,500 of the collection’s more than 60,000 pieces have been digitized. Browse the site, and you can find all manner of tags, posters, mailing labels, advertisements, business cards, book covers and letterhead. There is a booklet from Sri Lanka from 1959, a bound book from Russia from 1912 and a loose leaf from a Spanish Quran from 1150.”

Steemhunt: GooFonts – Clear and simple search for suitable Google Fonts

Steemhunt: GooFonts – Clear and simple search for suitable Google Fonts. “It’s not that easy to find a suitable font in Google Fonts, because the names of the fonts don’t have a statement about the result. Now GooFonts can help, here you can search with corresponding tags in the 974 fonts.” This is a very brief mention, but the only other useful thing I could find about GooFonts was a story in German which was stubborn about translating.

Hongkiat: Live Test Fonts On Browser Easily With Font Dragr

Hongkiat: Live Test Fonts On Browser Easily With Font Dragr . “The font used on the website affects to the reading experience of the users which is why web designers often spend a lot of their time finding good fonts pair that will suit their website’s design. We pick a font, then convert it to a Web-compatible format, and then add it into the style-rules. It’s far from efficient, especially when you have to repeat the process multiple times, with multiple fonts. Here is an alternative: Font Dragr.”

CBC: Why this ‘language geek’ provides hundreds of Indigenous language tools for free

New-to-me, from CBC: Why this ‘language geek’ provides hundreds of Indigenous language tools for free. “Chris Harvey had a ‘pivotal moment’ when he was in Grade 7. He found a book in the library on how to speak Moose Cree. That’s where he discovered syllabics, what he calls the language of his northern neighbours, and hasn’t looked back since. Harvey, 47, is the man behind… a site that provides keyboards and fonts in more than 100 Indigenous languages, including all of the ones in northern Canada, as well as languages in Australia, New Zealand and the U.S.”