Domestika: This Digital Archive Is a Treasure Chest of Typography and Design

Domestika: This Digital Archive Is a Treasure Chest of Typography and Design. “The TM Research Archive is a website created by a Swiss student, called Louise Paradis, as her final project for her master’s degree. It compiles information about and images from Typographische Monatsblätter, dating between the 1970s and 1990s. It is a treasure chest filled to the brim with dozens of covers, indexes from different issues, and detailed biographies of its most prominent designers and typographers.”

Hongkiat: 100 Free Fonts for Commercial and Personal Use

Hongkiat: 100 Free Fonts for Commercial and Personal Use. “Each time a designer starts work on a new design, there is always a big problem: a lack of high-quality materials, such as fonts, icons, images etc. Of course, you can create a font that will properly fit the design you created, but it’s not a good idea since font creation takes a lot of time, which is never enough when you have to work within a deadline. The solution is simple: you can use ready-made free fonts. There are tons of them all over the web, and we have but collected a small group of 100 free fronts you can download here.”

San Francisco Chronicle: Letterform Archive makes striking typefaces available to public with online archive

San Francisco Chronicle: Letterform Archive makes striking typefaces available to public with online archive. “So far, 1,500 of the collection’s more than 60,000 pieces have been digitized. Browse the site, and you can find all manner of tags, posters, mailing labels, advertisements, business cards, book covers and letterhead. There is a booklet from Sri Lanka from 1959, a bound book from Russia from 1912 and a loose leaf from a Spanish Quran from 1150.”

Steemhunt: GooFonts – Clear and simple search for suitable Google Fonts

Steemhunt: GooFonts – Clear and simple search for suitable Google Fonts. “It’s not that easy to find a suitable font in Google Fonts, because the names of the fonts don’t have a statement about the result. Now GooFonts can help, here you can search with corresponding tags in the 974 fonts.” This is a very brief mention, but the only other useful thing I could find about GooFonts was a story in German which was stubborn about translating.

Hongkiat: Live Test Fonts On Browser Easily With Font Dragr

Hongkiat: Live Test Fonts On Browser Easily With Font Dragr . “The font used on the website affects to the reading experience of the users which is why web designers often spend a lot of their time finding good fonts pair that will suit their website’s design. We pick a font, then convert it to a Web-compatible format, and then add it into the style-rules. It’s far from efficient, especially when you have to repeat the process multiple times, with multiple fonts. Here is an alternative: Font Dragr.”

CBC: Why this ‘language geek’ provides hundreds of Indigenous language tools for free

New-to-me, from CBC: Why this ‘language geek’ provides hundreds of Indigenous language tools for free. “Chris Harvey had a ‘pivotal moment’ when he was in Grade 7. He found a book in the library on how to speak Moose Cree. That’s where he discovered syllabics, what he calls the language of his northern neighbours, and hasn’t looked back since. Harvey, 47, is the man behind… a site that provides keyboards and fonts in more than 100 Indigenous languages, including all of the ones in northern Canada, as well as languages in Australia, New Zealand and the U.S.”

How-To Geek: Fonts and Browser Extensions That Help Those with Dyslexia Read the Web

How-To Geek: Fonts and Browser Extensions That Help Those with Dyslexia Read the Web. “Dyslexia is a learning condition characterized by difficulties with reading and, to a lesser extent, writing. As the web is full of written content, the right fonts and extensions can make consuming digital content much easier for those with dyslexia.”

Creative Commons: Introducing CC Accidenz Commons: An Open-Licensed Font

Creative Commons: Introducing CC Accidenz Commons: An Open-Licensed Font. “Since 2002, CC licenses—and the CC logo—have been used to share and make freely available billions of works in the Global Commons. CC has also grown to include an active Global Network, consisting of 41 local CC Chapters and over 450 members who use the logo to support their work. Due to this growth, we realized in 2018 that the original Akzidenz Grotesk font was not ideal for members of our Global Network to adapt and remix. We wondered: Can we develop an open-licensed Creative Commons font? Thanks to the kind support of a CC member, we did.”

Make Tech Easier: 6 Useful Tools to Help You Identify Fonts in Images

Make Tech Easier: 6 Useful Tools to Help You Identify Fonts in Images. “You come across an endless amount of images with text on them. Those images could either be advertising or something else. Either way, it’s nothing out of the ordinary to see a font that you want on a picture. The only problem is that you have no idea what that font is called. The good news is that there are various free tools you can use to identify that font. With the following apps, you’ll always be able to identify a font.”

Digital Inspiration: Want to Read Faster? Change your Default Font In Google Docs

Digital Inspiration: Want to Read Faster? Change your Default Font In Google Docs. “Google has added a new font family – Lexend – that will help you read faster and better. The font is available inside Google Docs, Sheets and Google Slides or you can download it directly from the Google Fonts website and use it in offline apps like Microsoft Word.”

Slate: End the Tyranny of Arial

Slate, and let me say up front I don’t agree with the “blogging is dead” part (for obvious reasons): End the Tyranny of Arial. “After an era where customizability was the norm, we’ve now reached a period where everything we read online looks the same. Blogging is dead, and the current dominant social media platforms have settled on a unified look: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram pages largely look the same. While Slack offers themes to change its default colors, and there are third-party apps to modify WhatsApp, there’s little you can do to change the look of messages you send.”

The Register: Fake ‘U’s! Phishing creeps use homebrew fonts as message ciphers to evade filters

The Register: Fake ‘U’s! Phishing creeps use homebrew fonts as message ciphers to evade filters . “Security house Proofpoint reports this week that miscreants hoping to steal login credentials from customers of ‘a major retail bank’ were able to hide their phishing emails from automatic detection tools by seemingly scrambling their messages into gibberish. Once rendered in an email client, the messages appear as coherent text, thanks to a custom font unscrambling the letters.”

ArchDaily: A Colorful Interactive Version of Euclid’s “Elements” Online for Free

Not sure how new this is, but looks like a gorgeous resource. ArchDaily: A Colorful Interactive Version of Euclid’s “Elements” Online for Free. “Written in 300BC, Euclid’s ‘Elements’ is a collection of 13 books containing definitions, propositions, and mathematical proofs, and is considered instrumental in the development of logic and modern science. With the advent of the printing press, many editions of the book have been shared through the centuries. One of the most famous is that of Oliver Byrne in 1847, an edition of the first six books that is set apart for its bold use of color to depict mathematical proofs, rather than using letters to label angles and shapes.”

Ars Technica: How do you preserve beloved New Orleans folk art? A Web font, of course

Ars Technica: How do you preserve beloved New Orleans folk art? A Web font, of course. “Few if any cities value local culture as much as New Orleans, but even the Crescent City has to navigate modern realities of change. And as new residents move in or new businesses replace old ones, some beloved bits of the city’s artistic fabric occasionally need intentional preservation. Case in point: the work of Lester Carey.”

The Guardian: Font of all knowledge? Researchers develop typeface they say can boost memory

The Guardian: Font of all knowledge? Researchers develop typeface they say can boost memory. “Australian researchers say they have developed a new tool that could help students cramming for exams – a font that helps the reader remember information. Melbourne-based RMIT University’s behavioural business lab and design school teamed up to create ‘Sans Forgetica’, which they say uses psychological and design theories to aid memory retention.”