How-To Geek: Fonts and Browser Extensions That Help Those with Dyslexia Read the Web

How-To Geek: Fonts and Browser Extensions That Help Those with Dyslexia Read the Web. “Dyslexia is a learning condition characterized by difficulties with reading and, to a lesser extent, writing. As the web is full of written content, the right fonts and extensions can make consuming digital content much easier for those with dyslexia.”

Creative Commons: Introducing CC Accidenz Commons: An Open-Licensed Font

Creative Commons: Introducing CC Accidenz Commons: An Open-Licensed Font. “Since 2002, CC licenses—and the CC logo—have been used to share and make freely available billions of works in the Global Commons. CC has also grown to include an active Global Network, consisting of 41 local CC Chapters and over 450 members who use the logo to support their work. Due to this growth, we realized in 2018 that the original Akzidenz Grotesk font was not ideal for members of our Global Network to adapt and remix. We wondered: Can we develop an open-licensed Creative Commons font? Thanks to the kind support of a CC member, we did.”

Make Tech Easier: 6 Useful Tools to Help You Identify Fonts in Images

Make Tech Easier: 6 Useful Tools to Help You Identify Fonts in Images. “You come across an endless amount of images with text on them. Those images could either be advertising or something else. Either way, it’s nothing out of the ordinary to see a font that you want on a picture. The only problem is that you have no idea what that font is called. The good news is that there are various free tools you can use to identify that font. With the following apps, you’ll always be able to identify a font.”

Digital Inspiration: Want to Read Faster? Change your Default Font In Google Docs

Digital Inspiration: Want to Read Faster? Change your Default Font In Google Docs. “Google has added a new font family – Lexend – that will help you read faster and better. The font is available inside Google Docs, Sheets and Google Slides or you can download it directly from the Google Fonts website and use it in offline apps like Microsoft Word.”

Slate: End the Tyranny of Arial

Slate, and let me say up front I don’t agree with the “blogging is dead” part (for obvious reasons): End the Tyranny of Arial. “After an era where customizability was the norm, we’ve now reached a period where everything we read online looks the same. Blogging is dead, and the current dominant social media platforms have settled on a unified look: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram pages largely look the same. While Slack offers themes to change its default colors, and there are third-party apps to modify WhatsApp, there’s little you can do to change the look of messages you send.”

The Register: Fake ‘U’s! Phishing creeps use homebrew fonts as message ciphers to evade filters

The Register: Fake ‘U’s! Phishing creeps use homebrew fonts as message ciphers to evade filters . “Security house Proofpoint reports this week that miscreants hoping to steal login credentials from customers of ‘a major retail bank’ were able to hide their phishing emails from automatic detection tools by seemingly scrambling their messages into gibberish. Once rendered in an email client, the messages appear as coherent text, thanks to a custom font unscrambling the letters.”

ArchDaily: A Colorful Interactive Version of Euclid’s “Elements” Online for Free

Not sure how new this is, but looks like a gorgeous resource. ArchDaily: A Colorful Interactive Version of Euclid’s “Elements” Online for Free. “Written in 300BC, Euclid’s ‘Elements’ is a collection of 13 books containing definitions, propositions, and mathematical proofs, and is considered instrumental in the development of logic and modern science. With the advent of the printing press, many editions of the book have been shared through the centuries. One of the most famous is that of Oliver Byrne in 1847, an edition of the first six books that is set apart for its bold use of color to depict mathematical proofs, rather than using letters to label angles and shapes.”