ProPublica: The Trump Administration Used Its Food Aid Program for Political Gain, Congressional Investigators Find

ProPublica: The Trump Administration Used Its Food Aid Program for Political Gain, Congressional Investigators Find. “A $6 billion federal program created to provide fresh produce to families affected by the pandemic was mismanaged and used by the Trump administration for political gain, a new congressional report has found. As a ProPublica investigation revealed last spring and as the new report further details, the Farmers to Families Food Box program gave contracts to companies that had no relevant experience and often lacked necessary licenses.”

Google Blog: A journey across Argentina’s culinary culture

Google Blog: A journey across Argentina’s culinary culture. “In collaboration with five cultural institutions including Gustar — an initiative of the Ministry of Culture, ArgenINTA Foundation, the Ministry of Agriculture and the Ministry of Tourism and Sports of Argentina — Google Arts & Culture’s latest project brings together all that Argentina’s gastronomic scene has to offer, from traditional fare to contemporary culinary trends.”

University of North Carolina: Bird food bytes

University of North Carolina: Bird food bytes. “It all started with caterpillars. UNC biologist Allen Hurlbert has long been fascinated with small forest songbirds, many of which peck and gobble caterpillars seasonally. And it was these small packets of protein and fat — perfect for certain birds — that spurred him to create the first comprehensive database of North American bird diets….The project includes 759 species, 993 studies and 73,075 records. And it’s growing.”

Mashable: The soothing relatability of Emily Mariko, TikTok’s latest food influencer

Mashable: The soothing relatability of Emily Mariko, TikTok’s latest food influencer. “There’s nothing all that difficult about her food — her most famous dish involves reheated rice, leftover salmon, and seaweed wrappers. She’s not pitching a diet. She’s not doing anything stunty or putting off bug-eyed, pick-me energy like men who’re budding influencers. Hell, she hardly even talks in most TikToks and went super viral for leftovers. And yet, Emily Mariko is the food internet’s latest Thing.”

No Veggies, No Buns, Few Forks: Schools Scramble to Feed Students Amid Shortages (New York Times)

New York Times: No Veggies, No Buns, Few Forks: Schools Scramble to Feed Students Amid Shortages. “Schools across the country are facing shortages of cafeteria staples like chicken, bread, apple juice and even plastic cutlery, as supply chain woes and a lack of truck drivers complicate the most basic task of feeding students. Officials say they are scrambling to provide meals for students — many of whom rely on the food they eat at school as a significant, and sometimes the only, source of daily nutrition. Many educators say they expect supply-chain issues will only worsen in the coming months.”

Thailand Covid: Idle taxis used to grow food for out-of-work drivers (BBC)

BBC: Thailand Covid: Idle taxis used to grow food for out-of-work drivers. “In a car park in the Thai capital Bangkok, green shoots sprout from the roofs of colourful taxis. Thailand’s tough Covid-19 restrictions have left the city’s hectic streets quiet, putting taxi drivers out of work. As fares dried up, many drivers left the city for their home villages, leaving so-called taxi graveyards behind.”

Aston University: Social media ‘likes’ found to positively influence healthy food choices – new research

Aston University: Social media ‘likes’ found to positively influence healthy food choices – new research. “The research, by psychologists from Aston University’s College of Health and Life Sciences, found that study participants who viewed highly liked mock Instagram posts of fruit and vegetables ate a significantly higher proportion of grapes than cookies, with consumption of grapes increasing by 14 per cent more calories, compared to those who viewed highly liked high calorie foods.”

Google Blog: How Indonesia helped spice up the world

Google Blog: How Indonesia helped spice up the world. “Spice Up The World, a new destination on Google Arts & Culture, is a collaboration with the Indonesian Ministry of Tourism & Creative Economy and Indonesia Gastronomy Network. It features 45 immersive digital stories that dive into Indonesia’s 1,000-year history of spices and give you a taste of the delicious dishes that make up Indonesian gastronomy.”

Google Blog: Taste Mexico: Sampling centuries of Mexican heritage

Google Blog: Taste Mexico: Sampling centuries of Mexican heritage. “The connection between food and cultural heritage couldn’t be stronger. And according to Mexican chef Martha Ortiz, Mexican food is identity…. Martha is one of the chefs who participated in Google Arts & Culture’s latest program, Taste Mexico. It showcases the deep connection between food, culture, legacy and art represented in Mexican food with more than 220 stories, 6000 images and 200 videos from 31 partner institutions.”

Atlas Obscura: How to Buy Pink Pineapples and Fruitcake Off Etsy

Atlas Obscura: How to Buy Pink Pineapples and Fruitcake Off Etsy. “Both social media and e-commerce sites, from Etsy to Instagram, host vibrant communities of food vendors and cooks-for-hire. Sure, you can buy a 40-pack of gummy bears on Amazon, or schedule a Whole Foods delivery. But can you buy fresh ice-cream beans shipped from the tropical fruit paradise that is Florida? Can you buy cornmeal cookies and juniper ash from a Native American company in Arizona? A wide world of hyper-local food exists online, sandwiched between advertisements and yard-sale listings.”