Phys .org: NASA forest structure mission releases first data

Phys .org: NASA forest structure mission releases first data . “NASA’s Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation mission (GEDI) released its first publicly available data on January 21, 2020, giving researchers access to measurements of forests around the world.”

White Mountain Independent: Arizona Memory Project now hosts collection of Apache County photos

White Mountain Independent: Arizona Memory Project now hosts collection of Apache County photos . “The Apache National Forest History collection from Round Valley Public Library highlights the history of the Apache and Sitgreaves National Forests beginning in the 1910s. The collection showcases the work of the Civil Conservation Corps, the National Forest Service and the logging industry in Apache County, Arizona….Viewers of the collection will find images of campgrounds, lodges, mills, reservoirs and lakes, construction projects, and the people that helped make the Apache National Forest a place to escape the summer heat.”

Phys .org: Network of leading forest restoration experts features new website

Phys .org: Network of leading forest restoration experts features new website. “The new website highlights key findings from 60+ publications, synthesized into eight key messages. Key messages focus on livelihoods and well-being, local decision making, planting trees, natural regeneration, tree cover change, climate change, holistic vision, and guiding principles. The interactive website guides visitors to each message and provides short summaries of foundational research findings and free access to peer-reviewed publications, policy briefs, and educational modules.”

Purdue University: Nature paper offers global map to understand changing forests

Purdue University: Nature paper offers global map to understand changing forests. “An international collaboration of hundreds of scientists – led in part by the Forest Advanced Computing and Artificial Intelligence (FACAI) Laboratory in Purdue’s Department of Forestry and Natural Resources – has developed the world’s first global map of tree symbioses. The map is key to understanding how forests are changing and the role climate plays in these shifts.”

Tree ‘fingerprinting’: a new weapon to defend forests (The Nation Thailand)

The Nation (Thailand): Tree ‘fingerprinting’: a new weapon to defend forests . “A timeworn laboratory in Britain’s Royal Botanic Gardens may not seem like the obvious epicentre of efforts to halt international illegal logging. Beakers bubble away on a hotplate, while suspect guitars that have been sent by customs officials for testing sit on top of shelves lined with tattered old journals and reference books in a multitude of languages. But scientists at the Wood Anatomy Laboratory, part of the research centre at the gardens in Kew, southwest London, are working on a new global project to help precisely identify the origin and species of timber.”

Quartz: Tropical rainforests have a soundtrack. Recording it may save them

Quartz: Tropical rainforests have a soundtrack. Recording it may save them. “Imagine a human city which has lost half of its inhabitants, or in which its diverse populations have been winnowed down to a single culture. While the buildings and roads may be standing, the many interactions that make the city hum would largely vanish. That’s what’s happening in many forests.”

Science Daily: Tropical trees in the Andes are moving up — toward extinction

Science Daily: Tropical trees in the Andes are moving up — toward extinction. “… UM researchers joined forces with 18 other researchers from around the world to create a new database that tracks the livelihoods of thousands of highland trees in 186 plots of land situated throughout what is known as the Tropical Andes Biodiversity Hotspot. Sitting at elevations from 300 to over 3,000 meters above sea level, most of the plots are about the size of an American football field and have been inventoried multiple times over the past couple decades. Collectively, these forest plots contain an astonishing diversity — a total of 120 different plant families, 528 genera, and more than 2,000 tree species.”