Lonely Planet: See California’s redwood forests for free and help protect them into the future

Lonely Planet: See California’s redwood forests for free and help protect them into the future. “Redwood State Parks contain part of the ancient coastal forest that originally spanned more than 2.2 million acres along California’s Big Sur Coast and north into Oregon. The gigantic trees were heavily hit by the demand for lumber following the 1849 Gold Rush, suffering a devastating reduction to cover only 5% of their original range. Thankfully, conservation efforts launched 100 years ago to help save the lumbering giants, which are now a huge attraction to nature-loving visitors in California.” An online guide to the 80+ redwood forest parks in California launches later this month.

DigitalNC: Images and Vertical Files from our Newest Partner, the Forest History Society

DigitalNC: Images and Vertical Files from our Newest Partner, the Forest History Society. “Photographs and vertical files from our newest partner, The Forest History Society, are now online at DigitalNC. The Forest History Society is a nonprofit organization located in Durham, North Carolina, that is dedicated to the collection and preservation of materials concerning forest history and conservation. The Forest History Society represents information about forestry around the world, but the materials now up on DigitalNC are specific to North Carolina.”

Phys.org: Students bring sixty years of data to life on the web

Phys.org: Students bring sixty years of data to life on the web . “For fields like environmental science, collecting data is hard. Gathering results on a single project can mean months of painstaking measurements, observations and notes, likely in limited conditions, hopefully to be published in a highly specialized journal with a target audience made up mostly of just other specialists in the field. That’s why when, this past summer, Duke students Devri Adams, Camila Restrepo and Annie Lott set out with Professor Emily Bernhardt to combine over six decades of data on the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest into a workable, aesthetically pleasing visualization website, they were really breaking new ground in the way the public can appreciate this truly massive store of information.”

Reuters: Bunge, partners launch Brazil database to combat deforestation

Reuters: Bunge, partners launch Brazil database to combat deforestation. “Bunge Inc and partners on Tuesday launched an online database aimed at helping companies make investment and purchasing decisions that discourage farmers from cutting down trees for arable land. The Portuguese-language database … currently has data on Brazil’s Cerrado and will later include the Amazon region. The information can be used to assess the social and environmental risks of contributing to deforestation through soybean planting expansion in Brazil, the world’s largest exporter of the oilseeds.”

Mongabay: New lichen database takes big picture approach to forest monitoring

Mongabay: New lichen database takes big picture approach to forest monitoring. “The United States Forest Service is about to release a huge new database chronicling the abundance and diversity of lichens across the country. Why lichens? Because these amalgamations of fungi and algae or cyanobacteria — often found crusting over rocks and tree trunks or garlanding branches — are super sensitive indicators of air quality and climate change.”

The Sixth Tone: Online Database Maps China’s Last Undisturbed Forests

The Sixth Tone: Online Database Maps China’s Last Undisturbed Forests. “China’s old-growth forests are vital to biodiversity but also under threat, say the organizations behind a new database aimed at protecting them. Wuhan University and Greenpeace East Asia (GPEA) launched Nature Guardian, a website that maps and monitors forests, nature reserves, and more, on Tuesday, the International Day of Forests.” I can’t find an option to see the site in English and Chrome does not offer to translate, which is a shame because most news coverage of China I see is about urban areas. It’s a shock to learn that China’s old-growth forests cover almost 158,000 square kilometers.)

Phys.org: Historic cultural records inform scientific perspectives on woodland uses

Phys.org: Historic cultural records inform scientific perspectives on woodland uses. “Scientists at the University of York and University College Cork have investigated how cultural records dating back 300 years could help improve understanding of the ways in which science interprets the many uses of woodland areas. The researchers hope that the work will give a cultural narrative to environmental data collected over time, but also give new insight into the ways in which woodland management systems can be adapted to increase a sense of ownership amongst communities that live near woodland areas.”