Daily Camera: CU Boulder Museum of Natural History releases interactive 3D scan of triceratops skull fossil

Daily Camera: CU Boulder Museum of Natural History releases interactive 3D scan of triceratops skull fossil. “The University of Colorado Boulder’s Museum of Natural History recently released on the internet an interactive 3D scan of its triceratops skull, a fossil nearly the size of a small car.”

Scientific American: Supercomputer Scours Fossil Record for Earth’s Hidden Extinctions

Scientific American: Supercomputer Scours Fossil Record for Earth’s Hidden Extinctions. “Using the world’s fourth most powerful supercomputer, Tianhe II, a team of scientists based mostly in China mined a database of more than 11,000 fossil species that lived from around 540 million to 250 million years ago. The result is a history of life during this period, the early Palaeozoic era, that can pinpoint the rise and fall of species during diversifications and mass extinctions to within about 26,000 years.”

Daily Iowan: UI fossil collection receives 18,000 donated pieces

Daily Iowan: UI fossil collection receives 18,000 donated pieces. “UI Earth and Environmental Sciences Collections Manager Tiffany Adrain is in charge of handling the fossil donation. She helped move the 250 boxes of bones this summer with the help of four intrigued students…. [Robert] Wolf documented all of his fossils on index cards and organized them into 22 boxes and two binders. This information will be cross-referenced by professionals and faculty members from the UI and other institutions after it is added to an online database, Adrain said.”

Ars Technica: Rising Star found a new species—now it wants to find a new way for paleoanthropology

Terrific article from Ars Technica: Rising Star found a new species—now it wants to find a new way for paleoanthropology. “For most of its history, paleoanthropology has been a science built out of superlatives. Headlines tell us about the oldest fossil. The most complete skeleton. The earliest modern human. These sorts of claims make it easy to assume that the science of human evolution is driven by discovery, and the superlative-laden Rising Star project is proof that there’s a never-ending interest in fossil hominin finds. But science is a social process, and, more than anything else, Rising Star has dared its fellow paleoanthropologists to re-examine how they’re going about the business of doing their science. Homo naledi has had enough cultural cachet to challenge the science of human evolution to be more open and accessible with its data.”

The Harvard Gazette: Fish teeth mark periods of evolution

The Harvard Gazette: Fish teeth mark periods of evolution. “Elizabeth Sibert is rewriting the story of how the asteroid impact that killed off the dinosaurs affected fish, and she’s doing it one tooth at a time. Based on close examination of thousands of fossilized fish teeth, Sibert, a Junior Fellow of the Harvard Society of Fellows, found that while the impact did cause some fish species to die off, it also set the stage for two periods of rapid evolution among marine life….Going forward, Sibert said she hopes to continue to build a database of fossil teeth and is working with collections at Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ) to connect the ancient teeth with modern fish.”

Printing dinosaurs: Idaho Virtualization Lab leads a “3-D revolution” (The Bengal)

The Bengal: Printing dinosaurs: Idaho Virtualization Lab leads a “3-D revolution”. “[Idaho State University] houses the Idaho Virtualization lab in the Idaho Museum of Natural History, which is on the leading edge of the 3-D printing revolution in digitizing and printing fossils, according to museum director Leif Tapanila. The program has been going for 15 years, and Tapanila said in those years, the rest of the country has begun to recognize the value of digitizing and 3-D printing fossils.”