Engadget: Google used photogrammetry to create a detailed VR tour of Versailles

Engadget: Google used photogrammetry to create a detailed VR tour of Versailles. “If you don’t own a Vive or Rift headset (it’s only available on those two platforms for now), Google has also unveiled an online exhibition featuring over 390 assets, including objects, artifacts and paintings. You can go on a private tour of six of the Palace’s most famous rooms, with accompanying audio from historical experts.”

RFI: The 100-year horror of France’s most notorious serial killer unveiled

Part new, part new-to-me, from RFI: The 100-year horror of France’s most notorious serial killer unveiled. “On 12 April 1919, Paris police arrested Henri Désiré Landru, who went into history as France’s most notorious serial killer. Convicted of having murdered at least 11 people, including 10 women, he was guillotined in February 1922. Today, documents covering the Landru case are available online and offer a chilling picture of the life and times of the ‘French Bluebeard’.”

British Library: Launch of The Polonsky Foundation Pre-1200 Project

Mentioned this back in 2016 when it was announced, so happy to mention its launch. British Library: Launch of The Polonsky Foundation Pre-1200 Project. “Today we are celebrating with our esteemed colleagues from the Bibliothèque nationale de France. Together we have digitised and re-catalogued 800 medieval manuscripts from England and France. We have also created two bilingual web resources making these manuscripts available freely and interpreting their significance.”

YaleNews: Digital humanist Schuwey on rebooting a 400-year-old French Facebook

YaleNews: Digital humanist Schuwey on rebooting a 400-year-old French Facebook. “At Yale, in the newly reopened Digital Humanities Lab (DHLab), [Christophe] Schuwey will work on one of his latest projects, which involves digitizing the printed books of written portraits that circulated amongst French elites and high bourgeoisie in the 1600s — which, he said, functioned pretty much like Facebook does today. Schuwey will use 21st-century computing technology to relink these 17th-century social networks, giving modern scholars like himself new access to this lost ‘virtual world’ of fluctuating social hierarchy and markets of individual reputation in 1600s France.”

British Library: A midsummer milestone

British Library: A midsummer milestone. “To mark midsummer, that most magical of days, we have another exciting update from The Polonsky Foundation England and France Project. In a ground-breaking collaboration, the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France have now digitised and published online 600 out of the selected 800 manuscripts. The remaining 200 manuscripts will be made available later this year. To get an idea of the range of manuscripts included so far, we have compiled a list (available in PDF and Excel formats) containing shelfmarks and titles, along with links to view the manuscripts in either Digitised Manuscripts at the BL or Archives et manuscrits at the BnF.”

Phys .org: Multidisciplinary study provides new insights about French Revolution

Phys .org: Multidisciplinary study provides new insights about French Revolution. “New research from experts in history, computer science and cognitive science shines fresh light on the French Revolution, showing how rhetorical and institutional innovations won acceptance for the ideas that built the French republic’s foundation and inspired future democracies. The researchers, including an Indiana University professor, doctoral student and undergraduate, used data-mining techniques to comb through transcripts of 40,000 speeches from the two-year tenure of the National Constituent Assembly, the first parliament of the revolution.”