Wired: France’s vaccine passport worked – sort of

Wired: France’s vaccine passport worked – sort of. “Experts say that the months-long mass vaccinations, with extensive media coverage and a clear, beneficial impact on hospitalisations, have made the general public much less wary than it used to be, helping people accept Covid passports. In July, ahead of Macron’s announcements, the share of people who still refused to get vaccinated against Covid was down to 15-20 per cent. However, while France’s vaccine passport policy has gone down well with much of the population, the minority that opposes it is very vocal.”

France 24: French ex-health minister Buzyn under formal investigation over handling of pandemic

France 24: French ex-health minister Buzyn under formal investigation over handling of pandemic. “Former French Health Minister Agnes Buzyn has been put under formal investigation on Friday over her handling of the Covid-19 pandemic last year, after investigators at a special court in Paris concluded there were grounds to prosecute her. Buzyn has been charged with “endangering the lives of others”, the prosecutor of the Republic’s Court of Justice said, but not for a second possible offence of ‘failure to stop a disaster’.”

TechCrunch: ProtonMail logged IP address of French activist after order by Swiss authorities

TechCrunch: ProtonMail logged IP address of French activist after order by Swiss authorities. “ProtonMail, a hosted email service with a focus on end-to-end encrypted communications, has been facing criticism after a police report showed that French authorities managed to obtain the IP address of a French activist who was using the online service. The company has communicated widely about the incident, stating that it doesn’t log IP addresses by default and it only complies with local regulation — in that case Swiss law. While ProtonMail didn’t cooperate with French authorities, French police sent a request to Swiss police via Europol to force the company to obtain the IP address of one of its users.”

Daily Beast: From Super-Spreader Sex Houses to Nude Beach Fistfights, Vaccinated Partying Not All It’s Cracked Up to Be

Daily Beast: From Super-Spreader Sex Houses to Nude Beach Fistfights, Vaccinated Partying Not All It’s Cracked Up to Be. “After being woken up by the sound of a little dog below me humping his favorite teddy bear, I crawl down the ladder of a kid bunk bed and head downstairs to assess the damage of last night’s debauchery. Cigarette butts, empty wine bottles, and half eaten baguettes litter the kitchen and pool area of this mini French mansion my friend Jackie is currently dog sitting at. There’s puke around the toilet in the ‘cave’ downstairs, a hot Frenchie sashaying through the kitchen in his gunties, still high on X, and a middle-aged dude starfished face up on these people’s shmancy leather couch, completely naked. Goddamn it’s good to be going back to normal!”

France24: Macron pressured to apologise for nuclear tests in French Polynesia

France24: Macron pressured to apologise for nuclear tests in French Polynesia. “Macron will be ‘encouraging several concrete steps’ regarding the legacy of nuclear tests, with the opening up of state archives and individual compensation, a French presidential official who asked not to be named said. French officials denied any cover-up of radiation exposure at a meeting earlier this month with delegates from the semi-autonomous territory led by President Edouard Fritch. The meeting came after French investigative website Disclose reported in March that the impact from the fallout was far more extensive than authorities had acknowledged, citing declassified French military documents on the 193 tests.”

CNBC: Google agrees to change global advertising practices as France imposes unprecedented $268 million fine

CNBC: Google agrees to change global advertising practices as France imposes unprecedented $268 million fine. “France’s competition watchdog fined Google 220 million euros ($268 million) on Monday for abusing its market power in the online advertising industry. The French Competition Authority said Google had unfairly sent business to its own services and discriminated against the competition. Google has agreed to pay the fine and end some of its self-preferencing practices, the watchdog said.” Some?