When war comes to work: Tensions rise for Ukrainian workers at freelance marketplace (Washington Post)

Washington Post: When war comes to work: Tensions rise for Ukrainian workers at freelance marketplace. “A real-time information war is playing out among Ukrainian and Russian freelancers on internal communication channels operated by Toptal. The heated debates about Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and misinformation is forcing Toptal to moderate sensitive geopolitical conversations. It’s also receiving backlash from pro-Ukraine freelancers, who want the company to take a stronger stance on the war. It’s a microcosm of the war playing out in the workplace and highlights the difficulties global companies must navigate when dealing with employees in a war zone.”

Make Tech Easier: 12 of the Best Job Search Sites for Remote Work

Make Tech Easier: 12 of the Best Job Search Sites for Remote Work. “As commuting to work is minimized, employees are able to better utilize their time to be more productive or take care of their personal errands they might have otherwise needed to do during work hours. Remote work has shown itself to be a big win for everyone involved. Read on to discover some of the best sites to search for remote work.” Some of these resources are more about freelancing than full-timing, but it’s still a solid list.

MakeUseOf: LinkedIn Launches Service Marketplace, but Can It Compete With Fiverr and Upwork?

MakeUseOf: LinkedIn Launches Service Marketplace, but Can It Compete With Fiverr and Upwork?. “Freelancers can now find work projects on LinkedIn. The popular professional social network is opening up opportunities for professionals to find work on its platform, going beyond merely giving them the tools to advertise their skills and experience. LinkedIn will do this through Service Marketplace, a new feature to compete with the likes of Fiverr and Upwork, but does Marketplace stand a chance against these platforms? Let’s find out.”

New York Times: For Gig Workers and Business Owners, Taxes Are Even Trickier Now

New York Times: For Gig Workers and Business Owners, Taxes Are Even Trickier Now. “Tax time is always complicated for freelancers and business owners, but this year, it’s especially swampy. Pandemic relief programs that helped small companies and self-employed individuals created new tax challenges. And many people had unusually jumbled patchworks of jobs and income sources last year.”

Artnet: Are You an Artist Looking for Work? This New Website Wants to Connect You With Paying Customers Hungry to Learn How to Make Art

Artnet: Are You an Artist Looking for Work? This New Website Wants to Connect You With Paying Customers Hungry to Learn How to Make Art. “[The site] is designed to work similarly to TaskRabbit or Fiverr, websites that link gig workers to employers looking for people to do one-off jobs. It invites photographers, dancers, and website designers, among those in other disciplines, to sell their skills and knowledge to anyone looking for art lessons, or even to buy artworks. It’s free to sign up, and unlike other sites, HireArtists doesn’t collect a fee.”

Now on GitHub: Relief Fund Registry

Found via Reddit: Relief Fund Registry. “The Covid-19 crisis has severely impacted many folks’ ability to generate income and cover their living expenses. Fortunately, there are a multitude of funding options available for individuals during these troubling times, and we’ve created a simple aggregator of available organizations through which you or your family can apply to receive a helping hand.”

New Web Site Aggregates Resources for Freelancers Impacted by Coronavirus

A new Web site is working to aggregate information for freelancers impacted by COVID-19: COVID-19 Freelance Artist Resources. From the front page “This list is specifically designed to serve freelance artists, and those interested in supporting the independent artist community. This includes, but is not limited to, actors, designers, producers, technicians, stage managers, musicians, composers, choreographers, visual artists, filmmakers, craft artists, teaching artists, dancers, writers & playwrights, photographers, etc.”

Towards Data Science: Analyze and Track Freelance Revenue with Google Calendar and Pandas

Towards Data Science: Analyze and Track Freelance Revenue with Google Calendar and Pandas. “My life and work schedules are run by Google Calendar — this includes all of my private classes, bike/photography tours, academy work, governmental positions, translation gigs, and random freelance jobs. Every ‘unit’ of paid work is in the calendar; I simply needed to figure out a way to directly access the Google Calendar data and rebuild my spreadsheet into a sustainable analyzing machine. In my previous corporate life, I worked exclusively in the world of Pandas Notebooks (Python framework for analyzing data) — therefore it was a natural solution to leverage those tools to access my class schedule from Google Calendar and utilize Pandas to process and analyze the revenue data.”

The Verge: Microsoft unveils special Skype version for freelancers

The Verge: Microsoft unveils special Skype version for freelancers. “Microsoft is creating a unique version of Skype for small business owners and freelancers. The software giant is planning to preview the new version of Skype shortly as a desktop client in the US. Microsoft’s ‘Skype Professional Account’ combines Skype calls, calendar meetings, and payments. This is particularly useful for freelancers that might use Skype to provide tutorials, training, or consulting.”

Skyword: How to (Actually) Use Twitter for Freelance Writing Jobs

Skyword: How to (Actually) Use Twitter for Freelance Writing Jobs. “You probably had that one friend in college. Someone you didn’t like all that much, but kept around because they always seemed to know about the best parties. For those looking for freelance writing jobs, social media can feel akin to that friend—in other words, a necessary evil. It is no longer enough to be able to dissect complicated concepts into digestible and relatable copy or find witty and original ways to subversively spotlight a client’s product without ever mentioning its given name—you also have to be able to help share that content with the world.” This article is also a decent discussion of online community — focused on Twitter — in general.