Android Police: $3 ‘Twitter Blue’ subscription may include Scroll news and better bookmarks, but not editable tweets

Android Police: $3 ‘Twitter Blue’ subscription may include Scroll news and better bookmarks, but not editable tweets. “The social network has some major ideas for its new service. Twitter has been working towards diversifying its platform away from ads all year, introducing Super Follows and testing a paid “Undo Send” feature. Once the acquisition is complete, Scroll will factor into these new premium plans, giving users the ability to read articles and newsletters on Twitter as a subscriber.”

The Verge: IFTTT introduces Pro subscriptions, limits free version to three applets

The Verge: IFTTT introduces Pro subscriptions, limits free version to three applets. “IFTTT, a perennial favorite of smart home tinkerers everywhere, is going Pro. That means paid subscriptions for faster and more sophisticated IFTTT applets that can query more data sources to trigger multiple actions in the home. The free version will stick around but is now limited to just three applets — only Pro subscribers will be able to create unlimited personal applets.” I currently have seventeen active IFTTT applets, so this was a no-brainer for me. I hope to get some time to play with it and then share details with you.

BetaNews: Download your Flickr photos NOW if you don’t want to lose them

BetaNews: Download your Flickr photos NOW if you don’t want to lose them. “Three months ago, Flickr announced sweeping changes to its different accounts, the most significant of which was the news that anyone with a free account would be limited to storing 1,000 photos online. If you are a Flickr user with a free account, you may well have already noticed that you are unable to upload any more photos — the new limit kicked on in January 8. But in under two weeks, Flickr will not only prevent you from uploading photos that tip you over the magic number, it will start actively deleting files to keep you within the 1,000 limit.”

Reveal News: Judge unseals trove of internal Facebook documents following our legal action

Reveal News: Judge unseals trove of internal Facebook documents following our legal action. “A trove of hidden documents detailing how Facebook made money off children will be made public, a federal judge ruled late Monday in response to requests from Reveal. A glimpse into the soon-to-be-released records shows Facebook’s own employees worried they were bamboozling children who racked up hundreds, and sometimes even thousands, of dollars in game charges. And the company failed to provide an effective way for unsuspecting parents to dispute the massive charges, according to internal Facebook records.”

Knowledge@Wharton: Should Facebook Go Freemium?

Knowledge@Wharton: Should Facebook Go Freemium?. “With Facebook under heavy fire over its handling of privacy issues and its iconic head having been grilled by Congress over two days, the company is surely groping for ways to appease critics without derailing its money-machine model. In this opinion piece, Ravi Bapna, a professor at the University of Minnesota, suggests that a two-tiered service mode — including pay-for-service — could solve a lot of the social media company’s pressing problems.”

TechCrunch: MongoDB’s Atlas database service goes freemium

TechCrunch: MongoDB’s Atlas database service goes freemium. “MongoDB is still best known for its flagship NoSQL database product, but last year, the company also launched Atlas, a managed database-as-a-service offering that runs on AWS. At the time, MongoDB only offered a paid version of this service (which made sense, given that the company has to pay AWS for its servers), but starting today, it’ll offer developers who want to simply learn about MongoDB or start developing and prototyping apps on top of the service a free tier, too.” Would this help prevent the many MongoDB problems that have been reported in the last year? Just do a Web search for MongoDB leak and you’ll see what I mean.

Naked Security: Spora ransomware goes freemium with four different payment options

Oh, how nice. Freemium ransomware. “Many ransomware attacks include a try-before-you-buy feature on their pay pages, where you can decrypt one or two files for free as an inducement to trust the crooks. By allowing you to upload two randomly chosen files and then returning copies of the originals, the crooks are hoping to prove that they do, indeed, have the decryption key they’re offering to sell back to you.”