Ukraine war: Eurovision trophy sold to buy drones for Ukraine (BBC)

BBC: Ukraine war: Eurovision trophy sold to buy drones for Ukraine. “Kalush Orchestra, the Ukrainian band which won this year’s Eurovision Song Contest, have sold their trophy for $900,000 (£712,000; €838,000) to raise money for the war in Ukraine. The crystal microphone was auctioned on Facebook, with the aim of buying drones for Ukraine’s military.”

Reuters: Cryptocurrency crash devalues Ukraine’s government crypto fundraise

Reuters: Cryptocurrency crash devalues Ukraine’s government crypto fundraise. “Cryptocurrencies have fallen sharply in recent weeks. Bitcoin has lost more than 20% of its price so far in May, following a 17% drop in April, highlighting the risks faced by holders of the highly volatile assets. All the funds raised in the ‘Aid for Ukraine’ fund were stored in cryptocurrency but the government was able to spend $45 million of it on equipment for Ukraine’s army before the crash, Bornyakov said in written responses to Reuters questions.”

The Block Crypto: Ukraine launches website for donating and buying NFTs

The Block Crypto: Ukraine launches website for donating and buying NFTs. “Ukraine’s government launched a website where people can donate and buy non-fungible tokens (NFTs), in an attempt to raise more funds for the war efforts. The new site lists several NFTs, including a mfer and a MoonCat with a Ukrainian flag, and links to their pages on OpenSea, where users can place bids to buy them.”

Christian Science Monitor: Why a museum sold Mandela’s arrest warrant as an NFT

Christian Science Monitor: Why a museum sold Mandela’s arrest warrant as an NFT. “It was the first archival document in South Africa to be sold as an NFT, and the proceeds will benefit the struggling museum that now sits on the site of Liliesleaf Farm. On a continent whose historical artifacts have routinely been plundered by outsiders, the sale has been hailed as a savvy way for African countries to hold on to their heritage while also cashing in on the global elite’s new obsession with digital collectibles. But it also raises concerns about what could happen when the past – or a virtual copy of it – is auctioned off to the highest bidder.”

Christie’s: Christie’s Launches Art Relief Initiatives for Ukraine

Christie’s: Christie’s Launches Art Relief Initiatives for Ukraine. “This April and May, Christie’s will present an international program of exhibition and sales initiatives from London to New York to benefit Ukraine. Partnering with three major non-profit organisations—the World Monuments Fund (WMF), Doctors Without Borders / Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and CORE (Community Organized Relief Effort) Effort, Christie’s joins together with artists, consignors and collectors to raise essential funds in support of humanitarian aid and cultural heritage preservation efforts in Ukraine.”

My Lethbridge Now: Galt Museum raises fund for heritage institutions in Ukraine

My Lethbridge Now: Galt Museum raises fund for heritage institutions in Ukraine. “The Galt Museum has launched a fundraising campaign to support heritage institutions damaged by the war in Ukraine. The Friends of the Sir Alexander Galt Museum Society are administering the campaign and all proceeds will be transferred to a fund set up by the State Archival Service of Ukraine for reconstruction projects after the war, according to the Galt.”

Ars Technica: Wikipedia community votes to stop accepting cryptocurrency donations [Updated]

Ars Technica: Wikipedia community votes to stop accepting cryptocurrency donations [Updated]. “More than 200 long-time Wikipedia editors have requested that the Wikimedia Foundation stop accepting cryptocurrency donations. The foundation received crypto donations worth about $130,000 in the most recent fiscal year—less than 0.1 percent of the foundation’s revenue, which topped $150 million last year. Debate on the proposal has raged over the last three months.”

Seattle Times: Arts groups got creative about fundraising during COVID, and here’s why that’s likely to stay

Seattle Times: Arts groups got creative about fundraising during COVID, and here’s why that’s likely to stay. “Stuck behind closed doors for much of the last two years, arts organizations used to drawing viewers into their galleries and auditoriums have been tasked with instead bringing their art to viewers, all while reminding viewers their craft is worth financially supporting. To remain afloat, Seattle organizations held virtual fundraisers, asked audiences to be sponsors or members and launched streaming platforms. Seattle’s creators had to get creative; now, many organizations say their innovative funding models are here to stay.”

Smashing Magazine: Devs For Ukraine, A Free Online Charity Conference

Smashing Magazine: Devs For Ukraine, A Free Online Charity Conference. “In these difficult times, we all are Ukraine. Today we would like to highlight a wonderful initiative from the community: Devs For Ukraine, a free online charity conference in support of Ukraine, organized by the lovely people at Remote. The conference will take place April 25–26, 2022, with the goal to raise funds and provide support to Ukraine. The funds raised during the two days of the event will be evenly divided between eight non-governmental organizations.”

The Conversation: Airbnb’s Ukraine moment is a reminder of what the sharing economy can be

The Conversation: Airbnb’s Ukraine moment is a reminder of what the sharing economy can be. “As desirable vacation destinations go, war-torn Ukraine must surely rate low. But in the first month of Russia’s invasion, Airbnb bookings in Ukraine boomed, as people around the world used the accommodation platform to channel more than US$15 million in donations to the country. As with other forms of direct donation, using Airbnb to channel aid to Ukraine has been problematic. The company was relatively quick to waive the 20% commission it usually charges on transactions. But stopping scammers from setting up fake accounts to collect money from well-meaning donors has proven more difficult.”

Bloomberg: Elton John, Celine Dion Come Out For ‘Stand Up For Ukraine’ Social Media Rally

Bloomberg: Elton John, Celine Dion Come Out For ‘Stand Up For Ukraine’ Social Media Rally. “Celebrities from Elton John to Celine Dion took part of a social media rally on April 8 to raise funds for the millions of people displaced by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. International advocacy group Global Citizen organized the ‘Stand Up For Ukraine’ rally in advance of a pledging event for world leaders and corporations hosted by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen in Warsaw on April 9.”

Global News: New website to help Ukrainians in B.C.

Global News (Canada): New website to help Ukrainians in B.C.. “On the website, Ukrainians can access free services such as assistance in finding housing, signing up for health-care coverage, job postings, signing children up for school and learning about other community services. British Columbians can sign up to volunteer to house refugees, offer employment, or donate to the cause as well.”