Discover Magazine: Largest-Ever Fungi Bioblitz Catalogs the Diversity of North American Mushrooms and More

Discover Magazine: Largest-Ever Fungi Bioblitz Catalogs the Diversity of North American Mushrooms and More. “This fall, between September 15 and October 15, more than 30,000 volunteers combed through forests, fields and even their own backyards in search of the humble mushroom…. Altogether, the citizen scientists who took part collected nearly 150,000 fungi sightings, and identified almost 4,400 different species. Their findings were posted on a digital map, as well as to an online database, and the data they gathered will be used by mycologists who are studying the diversity of fungi across the continent.”

Kew Royal Botanic Gardens: Digitising Kew’s fungi collection

Kew Royal Botanic Gardens: Digitising Kew’s fungi collection. “We are currently digitising our large and varied collections, made up of over 8.5 million specimens. Amongst these are a collection of fungi, known collectively as a Fungarium. Kew is home to one of the largest and most historically important fungaria in the world, so digitisation will open up new avenues of research to global scholars.”

Creative Boom: A new tool by Pentagram’s Luke Powell and Jody Hudson-Powell grows letterforms from fungi

Creative Boom: A new tool by Pentagram’s Luke Powell and Jody Hudson-Powell grows letterforms from fungi. “We thought we’d seen it all. Until that is, Pentagram partners Luke Powell and Jody Hudson-Powell designed an interactive web tool that allows us to cultivate and download letterforms (and much more) by stimulating the mycelium growth found in fungi.”

Universiteit Leiden: New database brings structure to global fungal diversity

Universiteit Leiden: New database brings structure to global fungal diversity. “An organized overview of the current global fungal diversity, that is what Irene Martorelli and colleagues try to achieve with the new MycoDiversity Database (MDDB) she builds in collaboration with Naturalis Biodiversity Center. The new database will make it easier and quicker to observe which fungi are known and how they are distributed over the globe. This may lead to discovery of new fungal species.”

International Business Times: Scientists Discover New Parasitic Fungus On Twitter, Name It After Social Media Site

International Business Times: Scientists Discover New Parasitic Fungus On Twitter, Name It After Social Media Site. “A team of researchers discovered a new species of fungus thanks to a photo shared on Twitter. According to the team, their discovery highlights the increasing role of social media in research. The new species is now a part of the Laboulbeniales order of fungi, and the researchers named it Troglomyces twitteri after the social media site in which it was first observed.”

Leiden University: New database reveals plants’ secret relationships with fungi

Leiden University: New database reveals plants’ secret relationships with fungi. “Almost all vascular plants have a relationship with a fungus in their roots that allow them to obtain nutrients from the soil. This relationship, called mycorrhiza, is symbiotic, since the fungi too benefit from it. It is so important that most plant species would not be able survive without it. Until now, information on this symbiotic relationship has been scattered throughout myriad scientific publications.”

Purdue University: Nature paper offers global map to understand changing forests

Purdue University: Nature paper offers global map to understand changing forests. “An international collaboration of hundreds of scientists – led in part by the Forest Advanced Computing and Artificial Intelligence (FACAI) Laboratory in Purdue’s Department of Forestry and Natural Resources – has developed the world’s first global map of tree symbioses. The map is key to understanding how forests are changing and the role climate plays in these shifts.”

Ars Technica: What’s eating this 400-year-old painting? A whole ecosystem of microbes

Ars Technica: What’s eating this 400-year-old painting? A whole ecosystem of microbes. “If you could zoom in for a microscopic look at an oil painting on canvas, you would see many thin, overlapping layers of pigments—powdered bits of insects, plants, or minerals—held together with oils or glue made from animal collagens. Many of those pigments and binding materials are surprisingly edible to bacteria and fungi. Each patch of color and each layer of paint and varnish in an oil painting offers a different microbial habitat. So when you look at a painting, you’re not just looking at a work of art; you’re looking at a whole ecosystem.”

EurekAlert: Chiba University launched Open Access Resource ‘c-arc’

EurekAlert: Chiba University launched Open Access Resource ‘c-arc’ . “Chiba University launched a new academic resource collection named ‘Chiba University Academic Resource Collections (c-arc)’ which makes contents published and provided by Chiba University Libraries widely available on the web…. Now “c-arc” offers Rare eastern medicine book collection, Horticulture book collection on Edo-Meiji era, Archive of the family Machino and Fungi and Actinomycetes gallery.”

Curacao Chronicle: Tropical Dutch Biodiversity Now In One Database

Curacao Chronicle: Tropical Dutch Biodiversity Now In One Database. “Naturalis Biodiversity Center (NBC) is proud to announce the launch of the Dutch Caribbean Species Register… For the first time ever, NBC presents a complete overview of the known biodiversity (animals, plants, fungi) from the Dutch Caribbean: over 7.500 species. This online database is the result of an effort of Naturalis Biodiversity Center – the biodiversity research center and Dutch national natural history museum- to gather all relevant publications on the biodiversity and natural history of the six islands of the Dutch Caribbean: Aruba, Bonaire, Curaçao, Saba, Sint Eustatius and Sint Maarten.”

New Database of Soil Fungi

Now available: a database of soil fungi. “The below-ground associations that plants form with mycorrhizal fungi is one of the most prevalent and ancient symbioses on Earth. The fungi deliver nutrients and water, in return for plant-derived sugars. But scientists know very little about the impact this relationship has on how ecosystems function and can make few broad generalizations about relationships between plants and the fungi. The new database sheds light on that, even though it deals with just 351 plant species of the 450,000 that exist in the world. The database, which includes 4,010 studies from 438 peer-reviewed articles, contains data on how various plant species behave when inoculated with the fungi compared to when they are not.”