PC Gamer: No, Tabletop Simulator, you can’t outsource localisation to Google Translate

PC Gamer: No, Tabletop Simulator, you can’t outsource localisation to Google Translate. “Listen, Google Translate isn’t terrible in a pinch. If you need to quickly work out how to say ‘sandwich’ in German, it’ll do. Unfortunately, Tabletop Simulator developer Berserk discovered the hard way that you can’t replace a full localisation team with Google’s web tool. Last week’s update claimed to bump the number of supported languages in the table-flipper up to 29. But non-anglophone players quickly discovered this claim came with a massive caveat—namely, that the new translations seemed to have been hastily thrown together using Google Translate, with disastrous results.”

The Next Web: Become a sentient AI on the run from your evil ex in this ‘radically inclusive’ management game

The Next Web: Become a sentient AI on the run from your evil ex in this ‘radically inclusive’ management game. “A Long Journey to an Uncertain End is an upcoming strategy management game from recently-founded studio Crispy Creative. I’ve had my hands on a demo for the past few weeks and I can sincerely say it’s my most anticipated game of the year. The game (we’ll call it ALJ for short) is a gorgeous mashup of space opera, crew/time management, and deep storytelling. It’s set in a far future that conjures up Firefly, Cowboy Bebop, and The 5th Element in equal parts while also revealing a completely original world.”

Techdirt: Announcing The Winners Of The 3rd Annual Public Domain Game Jam!

Techdirt: Announcing The Winners Of The 3rd Annual Public Domain Game Jam!. “It’s that time again — the judges’ scores and comments are in, and we’ve selected the winners of our third annual public domain game jam, Gaming Like It’s 1925! As you know, we asked game designers of all stripes to submit new creations based on works published in 1925 that entered the public domain in the US this year — and just as in the past two jams, people got very creative in terms of choosing source material and deciding what to do with it.”

MakeUseOf: 4 Ways to Play Adobe Flash Games Without Flash

MakeUseOf: 4 Ways to Play Adobe Flash Games Without Flash. “Flash was a pillar of the internet through the 2000s and over a period of 20 years built a gaming legacy of unprecedented proportions, spanning tens of thousands of games. Now, as the websites hosting Flash content come down, many people are wondering, ‘will Flash’s gaming legacy suffer the same fate?’ In this article, we list a handful of projects intent on preserving Flash games for future generations.”

The Next Web: Skyrim modders are using AI to generate new spoken dialogue

The Next Web: Skyrim modders are using AI to generate new spoken dialogue. “If you’re unimpressed by some of Skyrim’s hilarious dialogue, a new AI app called VASynth lets you take over the scriptwriting. The tool uses voice samples from Bethesda games to convert text into speech. You can generate dialogue in the style of many voices from the publisher’s back catalog, including Skyrim, Fallout 4, and Morrowind.”

North Carolina State University: Tracing the History of Mobile Games

North Carolina State University: Tracing the History of Mobile Games . “NC State’s Mobile Gaming Research Lab is launching the Retro Mobile Gaming Database (RMGD). The RMGD is an online, publicly searchable database of early mobile games, intended for use by game scholars, students interested in games, and game enthusiasts. And if there are games missing from the database, we want you to tell us about them.”

BBC: Xbox sales boom as virus maintains grip on economy

BBC: Xbox sales boom as virus maintains grip on economy. “Microsoft has reported booming demand for its Xbox gaming consoles as the pandemic continues to lift the fortunes of the American tech giant. Its Azure cloud computing services also got a boost due to a surge in working and learning from home. The gains helped push the firm’s overall revenue up 17% to a record $43.1bn (£31.4bn).”

New York Times: The Lasting Lessons of John Conway’s Game of Life

New York Times: The Lasting Lessons of John Conway’s Game of Life. “In March of 1970, Martin Gardner opened a letter jammed with ideas for his Mathematical Games column in Scientific American. Sent by John Horton Conway, then a mathematician at the University of Cambridge, the letter ran 12 pages, typed hunt-and-peck style. Page 9 began with the heading ‘The game of life.’ It described an elegant mathematical model of computation — a cellular automaton, a little machine, of sorts, with groups of cells that evolve from iteration to iteration, as a clock advances from one second to the next.”

VentureBeat: Opera acquires YoYo Games for $10 million and launches Opera Gaming division

VentureBeat: Opera acquires YoYo Games for $10 million and launches Opera Gaming division. “Web browser maker Opera has acquired YoYo Games, maker of the GameMaker Studio 2 game engine, for $10 million, and it has also launched its Opera Gaming division. The deal underscores Opera‘s efforts to differentiate its web browser, Opera GX, through a gaming community. Opera itself has more than 380 million people using its web browsers worldwide, but the new Opera GX gaming browser has seven million monthly active users as of December, up 350% from a year earlier.”

Mashable: This clever bot turns Reddit arguments into video game scenes

Mashable: This clever bot turns Reddit arguments into video game scenes. “On Sunday, 24-year-old software engineer Micah Price from Cape Town, South Africa, unveiled what can only be described as a niche-but-genius creation: a bot that takes everyday arguments on Reddit and has them play out in the style of scenes from Ace Attorney, Capcom’s animated courtroom-based video game series. The end result is a gloriously dramatic affair that shines a whole new spotlight on Reddit’s comment section.”

Sapienza University of Rome: Valeteviatores, digitized Latin epigraphs become a historical video game

Sapienza University of Rome, and Google-translated from Italian: Valeteviatores, digitized Latin epigraphs become a historical video game. “The project, coordinated by the University of Navarra, aims to acquire 3D scans of a selection of Latin inscriptions preserved in various Roman cities, from Portugal to Rome, passing through France and Spain, which will then be edited in a historical video game.”