Philadelphia Inquirer: The pandemic caused a seed shortage. Here’s how to save them.

Philadelphia Inquirer: The pandemic caused a seed shortage. Here’s how to save them.. “‘The more you spend time with your plants, the more you develop a relationship with them,’ says Owen Taylor, founder of Truelove Seeds. The local seed company works with small farmers to cultivate and preserve not only rare seeds but also the stories and cultural significance behind them. It’s the difference, Taylor says, between seed-saving and seed-keeping (which is also Taylor’s Instagram handle, sans the hyphen).”

MakeUseOf: 5 Best Gardening Websites & Apps for Beginners to Garden Anywhere

MakeUseOf: 5 Best Gardening Websites & Apps for Beginners to Garden Anywhere. “Whether you have a house or an apartment, these are some of the best gardening websites, ebooks, and apps to cultivate your own little green patch. When you have some extra time at home, seize the opportunity to add a little greenery. If you have a garden, you can use it to grow vegetables and herbs, or beautify it with flowers. Growing plants in apartments has been shown to improve mood and mental stability. These gardening websites and apps have something in them for both beginners and experienced gardeners to reap what they sow.”

CNN: See the gardens of famous designers as Britain’s prestigious Chelsea Flower Show goes virtual

CNN: See the gardens of famous designers as Britain’s prestigious Chelsea Flower Show goes virtual. “Horticultural enthusiasts will be able to take a virtual tour of award-winning designers’ gardens when Britain’s famous Chelsea Flower Show goes online later this month for the first time in its history. Famous Japanese designer Ishihara Kazuyuki will open his garden — albeit virtually — to green-fingered fans as part of the show, which has closed its doors to the public for the first time since World War Two as a result of the coronavirus crisis.”

New Hampshire Union Leader: New website lists gardens open for public viewing

New Hampshire Union Leader: New website lists gardens open for public viewing. “More than 80 outstanding ornamental gardens in Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont are opening to the public this year, and all of them are described on a new nonprofit website dedicated to gardening and landscape design in northern New England.” The information is a little hard to find. Look for the Calendar link under the Landscape Lyceum menu.

Calling All Green Thumbs and Helping Hands: Get Involved with a Gardening Organization Near You (LawnStarter)

LawnStarter: Calling All Green Thumbs and Helping Hands: Get Involved with a Gardening Organization Near You. “As part of the LawnStarter Go Garden Initiative, we are collecting basic contact information (name, location, phone, etc.) to build a searchable database of gardening organizations across the US. If you would like your organization to be featured on our map, we would love to hear from you.”

Hyperallergic: Explore a Growing Archive of American Gardens with a New Smithsonian App

Hyperallergic: Explore a Growing Archive of American Gardens with a New Smithsonian App. “Gardening stories from across the United States, whether about 19th-century green spaces that enlivened vacant lots or community vegetable plots, are being collected and preserved through the Community of Gardens project. The digital archive from Smithsonian Gardens with the Archives of American Gardens was recently launched as a free mobile app, where you can navigate a map of over 80 gardens.”

Native Plants in California

Californians who like to garden! The California Native Plant Society has a new map of native plants. ” It’s called ‘Calscape,’ and the link to it is on their homepage. All you do is click on your location — say, Sonora — on its map of California and, voilà, you are given all the plants native to your area, with color photos, by category: perennials, annuals, trees, shrubs, grasses, succulents, vines, ground covers, plants that prefer sun, shade, are drought-tolerant, attract birds and butterflies, etc.”