The Register: Website fined by German court for leaking visitor’s IP address via Google Fonts

The Register: Website fined by German court for leaking visitor’s IP address via Google Fonts . “Earlier this month, a German court fined an unidentified website €100 ($110, £84) for violating EU privacy law by importing a Google-hosted web font. The decision, by Landgericht München’s third civil chamber in Munich, found that the website, by including Google-Fonts-hosted font on its pages, passed the unidentified plaintiff’s IP address to Google without authorization and without a legitimate reason for doing so. And that violates Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).”

TechCrunch: In bad news for US cloud services, Austrian website’s use of Google Analytics found to breach GDPR

TechCrunch: In bad news for US cloud services, Austrian website’s use of Google Analytics found to breach GDPR. “A decision by Austria’s data protection watchdog upholding a complaint against a website related to its use of Google Analytics does not bode well for use of US cloud services in Europe. The decision raises a big red flag over routine use of tools that require transferring Europeans’ personal data to the US for processing — with the watchdog finding that IP address and identifiers in cookie data are the personal data of site visitors, meaning these transfers fall under the purview of EU data protection law.”

BBC: WhatsApp issued second-largest GDPR fine of €225m

BBC: WhatsApp issued second-largest GDPR fine of €225m. “WhatsApp has been fined €225m (£193m) by Ireland’s data watchdog for breaching privacy regulations. It is the largest fine ever from the Irish Data Protection Commission, and the second-highest under EU GDPR rules. Facebook, which owns WhatsApp, has its EU headquarters is in Ireland, and the Irish regulator is the lead authority for the tech giant in Europe.” €225m is about $266.5 million USD.

CoinTelegraph: Brave Browser Delivers on Promise, Files GDPR Complaint Against Google

CoinTelegraph: Brave Browser Delivers on Promise, Files GDPR Complaint Against Google. “Now, the complaint is with the Irish Data Protection Commission. It accuses Google of violating Article 5(1)b of the GDPR. Dublin is Google’s European headquarters and, as Dr. Ryan explained to Cointelegraph, the Commission ‘is responsible for regulating Google’s data protection across the European Economic Area’.”

European Data Protection Board: The Swedish Data Protection Authority imposes administrative fine on Google

European Data Protection Board: The Swedish Data Protection Authority imposes administrative fine on Google. “The Swedish Data Protection Authority imposes a fine of 75 million Swedish kronor (approximately 7 million euro) on Google for failure to comply with the GDPR. Google as a search engine operator has not fulfilled its obligations in respect of the right to request delisting.” 7 million euro is roughly $7.8 million USD.

‘We have a huge problem’: European regulator despairs over lack of enforcement (Politico)

Politico: ‘We have a huge problem’: European regulator despairs over lack of enforcement. “Passed in May 2018, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) was largely viewed as a model for the United States and other nations struggling to find effective limits on data collection by technology companies. There was little doubt that, given the breadth of the law and the many suspected violations by global tech firms, there would soon be heavy fines or, at least, sanctions that would force Big Tech to change its operating methods. But that promise has not been fulfilled.”

BBC: Internet provider faces big GDPR fine for lax call centre checks

BBC: Internet provider faces big GDPR fine for lax call centre checks. “A German internet service provider faces a €9.6m ($10.6m; £8m) fine after being accused of failing to carry out tough enough customer ID checks. Germany’s data protection watchdog said anyone who called 1&1 Telecom could get extensive personal information about someone else solely by giving their name and date of birth.”

The Verge: GDPR Makes It Easier To Get Your Data, But That Doesn’t Mean You’ll Understand It

The Verge: GDPR Makes It Easier To Get Your Data, But That Doesn’t Mean You’ll Understand It. “I decided to test the ‘Right of Access’ offered by four of the biggest tech companies operating in the EU: Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google. What I found suggested that while you can certainly get the raw data, actually understanding it is another matter, which makes it harder to make informed decisions about your data.”

CNET: Google appeals $57M GDPR fine, defends privacy practices

CNET: Google appeals $57M GDPR fine, defends privacy practices. “Google will appeal a fine imposed by the French government over European privacy rules, the company said Thursday. France’s privacy regulator said earlier this week that it’s fining the internet giant 50 million euros (about $57 million) for not properly disclosing to people how their data was collected and passed to advertisers.”

City A.M.: Google hit with €50m fine by French data regulator in GDPR battle

City A.M.: Google hit with €50m fine by French data regulator in GDPR battle. €50m is a little over $56.8 million USD at this writing. “Though today’s fine is the largest under GDPR to date, it is relatively small in comparison to the legislation’s maximum penalty limit of up to four per cent of a firm’s annual global turnover. In Google’s case, the fine could have been more than $4.3bn (£3.3bn) based on revenues of $109.7bn in its last full financial year.”