The Verge: GDPR Makes It Easier To Get Your Data, But That Doesn’t Mean You’ll Understand It

The Verge: GDPR Makes It Easier To Get Your Data, But That Doesn’t Mean You’ll Understand It. “I decided to test the ‘Right of Access’ offered by four of the biggest tech companies operating in the EU: Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google. What I found suggested that while you can certainly get the raw data, actually understanding it is another matter, which makes it harder to make informed decisions about your data.”

CNET: Google appeals $57M GDPR fine, defends privacy practices

CNET: Google appeals $57M GDPR fine, defends privacy practices. “Google will appeal a fine imposed by the French government over European privacy rules, the company said Thursday. France’s privacy regulator said earlier this week that it’s fining the internet giant 50 million euros (about $57 million) for not properly disclosing to people how their data was collected and passed to advertisers.”

City A.M.: Google hit with €50m fine by French data regulator in GDPR battle

City A.M.: Google hit with €50m fine by French data regulator in GDPR battle. €50m is a little over $56.8 million USD at this writing. “Though today’s fine is the largest under GDPR to date, it is relatively small in comparison to the legislation’s maximum penalty limit of up to four per cent of a firm’s annual global turnover. In Google’s case, the fine could have been more than $4.3bn (£3.3bn) based on revenues of $109.7bn in its last full financial year.”

CNET: Facebook breach hit 3 million in EU, putting new privacy law to test

CNET: Facebook breach hit 3 million in EU, putting new privacy law to test. “Facebook may have a run-in with Europe’s new privacy law. The Irish Data Protection Commission said Tuesday that roughly 3 million Facebook users living in Europe were affected by a data breach at the social network in September, according to CNBC.”

Techdirt: Free Law Project Takes A Stand Against Attempt To Use GDPR To Disappear A Public Court Docket

Techdirt: Free Law Project Takes A Stand Against Attempt To Use GDPR To Disappear A Public Court Docket. “Last week, the Free Law Project, who operates the CourtListener website (and runs RECAP — the very useful system that will help automatically free up costly PACER dockets and documents that other RECAP users visit) noted that it, too, had recently received a GDPR demand about a docket (they do not say if it was the same one) and then go into a detailed description of why they are not taking action. The post notes that the general policy of the site has always been that they won’t remove a docket without a court order (though it may remove links from search engines). More importantly, however, the Free Law Project notes that it is not subject to the GDPR.”

Reuters: Mozilla co-founder’s Brave files adtech complaint against Google

Reuters: Mozilla co-founder’s Brave files adtech complaint against Google. “Brave, a privacy-focused web browser set up by Silicon Valley engineering guru Brendan Eich, filed privacy complaints in Britain and Ireland that could become a test case against search company Google and other digital advertising firms.”