Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford

Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford. “The graves of hundreds of African Americans and Native Americans lie in downtown Hartford’s Ancient Burying Ground, but without headstones they remain invisible. Excluded from official records or referred to only by race, their stories remain as hidden as their graves. Four centuries after enslaved people were first brought to America, a new project organized by the Ancient Burying Ground Association investigates hundreds of these untold stories. ‘Uncovering Their History’ shares the stories of colonists of color: an enslaved couple given away as a wedding present, black men who joined the Continental Navy in hopes of obtaining their freedom, Native American doctors and servants.”

Newsday: Long Island’s African-Americans find pride, sadness researching genealogy

Newsday: Long Island’s African-Americans find pride, sadness researching genealogy. “For African-Americans wondering whether their own genealogy research might uncover a runaway slave turned war hero or ancestors who prospered despite racial discrimination, there are burgeoning resources. Genealogists, family members and government archives can help black Americans reconstruct a family tree obscured by centuries of neglect and racial injustice. In addition, military records of African-American Civil War soldiers will soon be accessible in a searchable online database.”

Boston Globe: A digital family tree grows in Boston

Boston Globe: A digital family tree grows in Boston. “A massive genealogical project to digitize records from parishes in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston will expand its scope to the early 20th century, chronicling the lives of 10 million additional immigrants who maintained close ties to their ethnic communities amid the thrusts of assimilation.”

The Ultimate Digital Preservation Guide, Part Twelve: How to Begin to Take Archive Quality Photos (Genealogy’s Star)

Genealogy’s Star: The Ultimate Digital Preservation Guide, Part Twelve: How to Begin to Take Archive Quality Photos. “Making archive quality images is not as simple as using a scanner or randomly clicking a camera to make a digital image. When you start being involved with archive quality you soon learn that there are three ways to look at the ‘quality’ or resolution of the image: DPI, PPI, and LPI.”

Israel 21c: Israeli project seeks clues to old school photo mysteries

Israel 21c: Israeli project seeks clues to old school photo mysteries. “As 2.35 million Israeli children head back to school this week, the National Library of Israel is hoping that a new Back to School online project in collaboration with Facebook Israel will help fill in missing information on many of its rare historic photographs.”

DigitalNC: Issues of the Goldsboro News are available now on DigitalNC!

DigitalNC: Issues of the Goldsboro News are available now on DigitalNC!. “Nearly 1400 issues of The Goldsboro News have recently been digitized and added to DigitalNC. Previously, the only issue on DigitalNC was a special air force base commemoration from 1957, so the addition of these issues, from 1922 to 1927, provide a more robust account of Goldsboro’s past.”

Virginia Untold: Lancaster County Fiduciary Records 1657-1872 (Out of the Box)

Out of the Box: Virginia Untold: Lancaster County Fiduciary Records 1657-1872. “The Library of Virginia is pleased to announce the addition of the Lancaster County Fiduciary Records, 1657-1872, to Virginia Untold. This collection contains the earliest records added to Virginia Untold, and the largest number of names added from a single locality so far—over 20,000. Fiduciary records primarily consist of estate administrator settlements, estate inventories, dower allotments, estate divisions, estate sales, and guardian accounts that record a detailed list of all personal property owned by individuals, including enslaved people.”