Digital Library of Georgia: How I Built A Funeral Program Collection for African Americans in Atlanta

Digital Library of Georgia: How I Built A Funeral Program Collection for African Americans in Atlanta. “What started as a friendly competitive thought has now become another resource for researchers as well as scholars (I am one of the latter) who are interested in the individuals and local communities represented in the individual documents. The Atlanta funeral programs collection could possibly provide the information needed by a family historian (like myself) working to piece together their family’s story. This collection will always mean a lot to me, not only because I helped to start it but also because members of my own family are featured in the collection.”

Reuters: The race to save African-American cemeteries from being ‘erased’

Reuters: The race to save African-American cemeteries from being ‘erased’. “There are no national estimates on the number of Black cemeteries that are under threat from developers or have been abandoned. In Florida, where the governor this month signed a bill creating a task force to study the issue, lawmakers estimate there could be as many as 3,000. [Barbara] Heath and others have been supporting bills in Congress that would create a database of African-American cemeteries across the country and fund education and preservation programs.

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: National Archives grant will fund Pittsburgh records digitization, ‘a real boon’ for genealogy

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: National Archives grant will fund Pittsburgh records digitization, ‘a real boon’ for genealogy. “Just under $134,000 from the National Archives and Records Administration will fund the processing of 751 cubic feet of historical government records that contains seven collections from City Council, City Planning, the Planning Commission, the Department of Public Works, the Historic Review Commission and the Urban Redevelopment Authority.”

Voice of America: US-Based Non-Profit Group Reunites Ethiopian Families Separated by Adoption

Voice of America: US-Based Non-Profit Group Reunites Ethiopian Families Separated by Adoption. “Helped by an adoptive mom with strong tech skills, [Andrea] Kelley invested countless hours and $3,000 to launch BF-EAC [Beteseb Felega-Ethiopian Adoption Connection] in 2014. Since then, the organization – registered with the Ethiopian government as a nonprofit – has reconnected more than 200 adoptees with their Ethiopian relatives. More than 1,000 other cases remain active in the registry, with adoptees or their birth relatives seeking connections.”

Washington Post: He spent years uncovering the Stalin-era execution of his great-grandfather. Lawsuits seek to bury the evidence.

Washington Post: He spent years uncovering the Stalin-era execution of his great-grandfather. Lawsuits seek to bury the evidence.. “As cold cases go, Denis Karagodin’s mission was as bleak as the winter in his native Siberia. For nine years, he has been digging into Russian and Soviet archives to find out who killed his great-grandfather Stepan Karagodin in 1938 during the purges and iron-fist rule of Joseph Stalin…. But digging up the truth from the past can still bring trouble in today’s Russia.”

The Daily Orange: SU receives grants to digitize Oakwood Cemetery, Latinx community records

The Daily Orange: SU receives grants to digitize Oakwood Cemetery, Latinx community records. “A pair of state grants will enable Syracuse University professors and staff to digitize valuable records pertaining to Oakwood Cemetery and Syracuse’s Latino community. The grants, awarded by the Central New York Libraries Resource Council, will support two projects: converting decades-old death and burial records for Oakwood Cemetery into a searchable database and expanding digital access to cultural artifacts in the La Casita Cultural Center’s archives.”

IrishCentral: “Ambitious” digitization of Tipperary’s Famine-era records underway

IrishCentral: “Ambitious” digitization of Tipperary’s Famine-era records underway. “Tipperary County Council Library Service holds a vast collection of Poor Law Union Minute Books, Rate Books, and Workhouse Registers, encompassing virtually the entire county. In January, staff at Tipperary County Council Library Service undertook an ambitious project to commence digitizing its Famine-related Minute Books from the Poor Law Unions in Borrisokane, Cashel, Clogheen, Clonmel, Nenagh, Roscrea, Thurles, and Tipperary.” It looks like the site will launch in mid-May.

9 News: Century-old KKK ledgers for Denver are now digitized and available to the public

9 News: Century-old KKK ledgers for Denver are now digitized and available to the public. “A century ago, tens of thousands of people in Denver and the surrounding area joined the Ku Klux Klan, and their names were recorded in two ledgers that History Colorado has now digitized and made available for free online. The ledgers include nearly 30,000 entries on 1,300 pages from the 1920s and 1930s. They are the largest archival item digitally available from History Colorado’s collection, the museum announced on Monday.”

NARA: NARA Datasets on the AWS Registry of Open Data

NARA: NARA Datasets on the AWS Registry of Open Data. “The metadata index for the 1940 Census dataset is 251 megabytes, and all of the 3.7 million images from the population schedules, the enumeration district maps, and the enumeration district descriptions total over 15 terabytes. This dataset reflects the 1940 Census records that are also available on NARA’s 1940 Census website and in the National Archives Catalog.”

Tennessee Historical Commission: Tennessee Historic Cemetery Register and GIS Map of the State’s Historic Cemeteries

Tennessee Historical Commission: Tennessee Historic Cemetery Register and GIS Map of the State’s Historic Cemeteries. “The Tennessee Historic Cemetery Preservation Program will soon make a map of the state’s historic cemeteries available to the public. Identifying locations of the state’s numerous cemeteries is an on-going project and the map is subject to change as this work progresses. The Tennessee Historical Commission defines historic cemeteries as those 50 years old or older. However, some of the cemeteries on the map are not historic by definition–yet.”

The Verge: Google’s Area 120 incubator releases a powerful AI document scanner for Android

The Verge: Google’s Area 120 incubator releases a powerful AI document scanner for Android. “Google’s Area 120, an internal incubator program for experimental projects, is releasing a new app today called Stack that borrows the technology underlying the search giant’s powerful DocAI enterprise tool for document analysis. The end result is a consumer document scanner app for Android that Google says vastly improves over your average mobile scanner by auto-categorizing documents into the titular stacks and enabling full text search through the contents of the documents and not just the title.”

Times of Israel: Archives uncover forgotten names of Auschwitz inmates

Times of Israel: Archives uncover forgotten names of Auschwitz inmates. “Ewa Bazan, an archivist at the Auschwitz-Birkenau Museum, compares her work on newly accessible records to piecing together a ‘puzzle’ that is revealing new names and stories of the Nazi death camp’s inmates. Ninety percent of the notorious camp’s files were destroyed by its guards before they fled but a recently completed two-year collaboration with the Arolsen Archives in Germany is bringing new information to light.”

Watchdog: Routes given to census takers were often confusing (WRAL)

WRAL: Watchdog: Routes given to census takers were often confusing. “When asked by GAO investigators, only 21.6% of area census office managers were satisfied with the accuracy and efficiency of how cases were assigned, according to the report, a broad review of what worked and didn’t work during data collection for the release 2020 census….The report also noted that nearly 8,000 census takers who had failed their training tests were given assignments anyway, and that almost 1.2 million households were reached by census takers by telephone, a new option given to census managers.”