British Library: Anglo-Saxon charters online

British Library: Anglo-Saxon charters online. “In anticipation of the British Library’s major Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms exhibition, which opens on 19 October, we are delighted to have added the vast majority of our Anglo-Saxon single-sheet charters to our Digitised Manuscripts site. A full list of the 203 charters currently available can be downloaded here; we plan to add the remaining 8 charters in due course.” This article has a good overview of what Anglo-Saxon charters are if you aren’t familiar.

Genealogy’s Star: Where are we with social networking?

Genealogy’s Star: Where are we with social networking?. “What is happing in the world of blogs? What is happening on Facebook? What about Google+? And what about Twitter and Pinterest and Instagram? Not to mention, what is going on in the hundreds of other social networking websites. Last, of all, what does this have to do with genealogy.”

Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project: Introducing the Hartford Chronicle Family of African American Newspapers

Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project: Introducing the Hartford Chronicle Family of African American Newspapers. “The Connecticut Digital Newspaper Project is soon to digitize historical state African American weeklies from the World World II era. On March 26, 1949, Editor Ernie Durham and President George W. Goodman of the Hartford-based New England Bulletin, an African-American newspaper, declared that their new weekly would uphold ‘the crusade tradition’ of its predecessors. The Hartford Chronicle and the Connecticut Chronicle, they said, had contributed to six critical World War II-era civil rights victories for the African American community in Connecticut.”

Ottawa Citizen: Grieving families protest ‘duplicitous’ website that reposts death notices to sell flower deliveries

Ottawa Citizen: Grieving families protest ‘duplicitous’ website that reposts death notices to sell flower deliveries. “An Alberta man who, on the advice of doctors, is trying to keep news of his father’s death from his dementia-stricken mother, is the latest grieving family member to complain about a new website that reposts online obituaries alongside ads for flower deliveries.”

Virginia Memory: Extra, Extra! Virginia Chronicle Reaches 1,000,000 Pages!

Virginia Memory: Extra, Extra! Virginia Chronicle Reaches 1,000,000 Pages!. “Virginia Chronicle has surpassed a major milestone: 1,000,000 pages! Thanks to grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, agreements with publishers, cooperative projects, generous gifts, and continued support from the Library of Virginia, the Virginia Newspaper Project has added over 1,000,0001,000,000 newspaper pages to Virginia Chronicle–and looks forward to adding many more in the coming months. Recent additions include: 1879-1959 of the Northern Neck News of Warsaw, additional West Virginia titles and the Idle Hour of Glen Allen.”

Using Voice Recognition in Genealogy: Names and dates and places (Genealogy’s Star)

Genealogy’s Star: Using Voice Recognition in Genealogy: Names and dates and places. “Over the years, I have used voice recognition software off and on, always hoping that it would become the solution to quickly entering information so that I could avoid typing. Most recently, voice recognition software has become ubiquitous with smartphones and apps such as Siri and Google Assistant or one of the many other such programs. For example, when I get a phone message on my iPhone, the message is automatically transcribed into text.”

NZ Scoop: Index of historic Māori Land Court records now open access

NZ Scoop: Index of historic Māori Land Court records now open access. “The Māori Land Court Minute Books Index has been made available by Libraries and Learning Services at the University of Auckland, run as a joint project by Special Collections and Digital Services. The index covers the Native Land Court (as it was then called) for the years 1865-1910. The Court established in 1865 to award titles and partition surveyed blocks of Māori land, was renamed the Māori Land Court in 1954. Minute books were kept of all proceedings.”