Reykjavik Grapevine: new Website Tells Icelandic Women of Genetic Mutation Linked to Cancer

The Reykjavik Grapevine: New Website Tells Icelandic Women Of Genetic Mutation Linked To Cancer. “Icelandic research centre deCODE Genetics will open a website today where women will be able to find out whether or not their body is affected by a genetic mutation that increases the risk of breast cancer, RÚV reports.”

University of Guelph: U of G’s Genetic Archive Now Open to World

University of Guelph: U of G’s Genetic Archive Now Open to World. “One of the planet’s largest collections of DNA samples – a genetic Noah’s ark held at the University of Guelph representing Canadian creatures from mites to whales — will be made available starting today to researchers worldwide under an international biodiversity project. Throwing open the doors to a massive genetic archive at U of G’s Centre for Biodiversity Genomics (CBG) will provide online access to sample information for universities, government agencies and industry that may help researchers pursue projects ranging from human health to biodiversity, said Jeremy deWaard, the centre’s associate director of collections.”

Cornell Chronicle: New ‘Tomato Expression Atlas’ dives deep into the fruit’s flesh

Cornell Chronicle: New ‘Tomato Expression Atlas’ dives deep into the fruit’s flesh. “From fried green tomatoes to pizza pie, the world savors the tomato across many stages of ripeness, each with its unique qualities. How a fruit ripens has long been an important question for breeders, and the subject of an extensive and fruitful collaboration involving researchers at Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI), Cornell University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).”

MIT Technology Review: Google Has Released an AI Tool That Makes Sense of Your Genome

MIT Technology Review: Google Has Released an AI Tool That Makes Sense of Your Genome. “Almost 15 years after scientists first sequenced the human genome, making sense of the enormous amount of data that encodes human life remains a formidable challenge. But it is also precisely the sort of problem that machine learning excels at. On Monday, Google released a tool called DeepVariant that uses the latest AI techniques to build a more accurate picture of a person’s genome from sequencing data.”

The Atlantic: Huge DNA Databases Reveal the Recent Evolution of Humans

The Atlantic: Huge DNA Databases Reveal the Recent Evolution of Humans
. “When we talk about human evolution, we usually talk about how we evolved into humans: how we lost body hair, gained brain mass, started to walk on two feet—in short, things that happened millions of years ago. But evolution did not stop when the first modern humans emerged. A new study of two massive genetic databases—one in the United Kingdom and one in California—suggests genetic mutations that shorten lifespans have been weeded out since, and are possibly still in the process of being weeded out today.”

The Atlantic: Solving a Murder Mystery With Ancestry Websites

The Atlantic: Solving a Murder Mystery With Ancestry Websites. “On August 9, 1977, David Roth drove his mother’s car to Silver Lake. It was a hot day for Washington, the temperature slinking toward the high 80s, so he’d decided to go for a swim. He headed about 20 minutes north of Lynnwood, where he slept on his mom’s couch, and parked at a beach just off the road. But his plans changed when he noticed a girl trying to hitch a ride.”

A First: New Website Reveals Origin Of Genetic Samples And Date Collected (Smithsonian Blog)

Smithsonian: A First: New Website Reveals Origin Of Genetic Samples And Date Collected. “For the first time, a new public database will link genetic data with records of where and when the samples it was taken from were collected, making it easier for researchers to share and reuse genetic data for environmental and ecological analyses. The resource, called the Genomic Observatories Metadatabase (GeOMe), was developed by researchers at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in collaboration with researchers at California State University Monterey Bay5, UC Berkeley and six other museums and research institutions.”