Newswise: Museums Put Ancient DNA to Work for Wildlife

Newswise: Museums Put Ancient DNA to Work for Wildlife. “Scientists who are trying to save species at the brink of extinction are finding help in an unexpected place. Heather Farrington, curator of zoology for the Cincinnati Museum Center, is using DNA from specimens collected more than 100 years ago to help understand the evolution and stresses faced by today’s animals.”

Haaretz: Magic or a Trap? DNA Changes Study of the Past

Haaretz: Magic or a Trap? DNA Changes Study of the Past. “The ability to extract and sequence DNA from samples that are thousands and even hundreds of thousands of years old has led to significant breakthroughs in the study of evolution. By sequencing Neanderthal genomes, scientists have learned about the health, physical appearance and settlement patterns of Neanderthals. Even more important, DNA research led to the discovery of formerly unknown hominids…. These successes led researches to apply genetic tools to later periods, and according to some critics that is where the danger lies.”

National Institutes of Health: Five Petabytes of Sequence Read Archive Data Now in the Cloud

National Institutes of Health: Five Petabytes of Sequence Read Archive Data Now in the Cloud. “The National Center for Biomedical Information (NCBI) at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) recently moved the five petabytes of public SRA data to the cloud with support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Science and Technology Research Infrastructure for Discovery, Experimentation, and Sustainability (STRIDES) Initiative. These data include a variety of genomes, gene expression data, and more.”

Science Magazine: New federal rules limit police searches of family tree DNA databases

Science Magazine: New federal rules limit police searches of family tree DNA databases. “The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) released new rules yesterday governing when police can use genetic genealogy to track down suspects in serious crimes—the first-ever policy covering how these databases, popular among amateur genealogists, should be used in law enforcement attempts to balance public safety and privacy concerns.”

University Times (Ireland): A Corporation Wants Our Genome Data, While Universities are Denied Access

University Times (Ireland): A Corporation Wants Our Genome Data, While Universities are Denied Access. “To make the most of genetic research, academics need as much information on genes as possible. At the moment, however, that much-needed information is being gifted to a state-funded private company, Genomics Medicine Ireland (GMI). GMI is building a database of genomic information – sequencing the genomic information of people in Ireland, determining the whole genetic code of individuals and then anonymising it with a unique numerical tag.”

SGID: a comprehensive and interactive database of the silkworm (BioRxiv)

BioRxiv: SGID: a comprehensive and interactive database of the silkworm. “Although the domestic silkworm (Bombyx mori) is an important model and economic animal, there is a lack of comprehensive database for this organism. Here, we developed the silkworm genome informatics database, SGID. It aims to bring together all silkworm related biological data and provide an interactive platform for gene inquiry and analysis. The function annotation in SGID is thorough and covers 98% of the silkworm genes.”

The Hindu: ‘India-specific cancer genome database being developed’

The Hindu: ‘India-specific cancer genome database being developed’. “The Union Health Ministry, in collaboration with the Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, is developing India-specific cancer genome database that will help identify biomarkers specific to the Indian population. This will help in early diagnosis, and also identify drug targets for the Indian population.”