The Verge: 23andMe sold the rights to a drug it developed from its genetic database

The Verge: 23andMe sold the rights to a drug it developed from its genetic database. “The genetics testing company 23andMe licensed the rights to a drug it developed in-house to a Spanish pharmaceutical company, Bloomberg reported. This is the first time that the company has directly sold a product it created using the genetic information collected from users.”

Celebrating One Million Records: An Open-access Database for Clinical Geneticists (Technology Networks)

Technology Networks: Celebrating One Million Records: An Open-access Database for Clinical Geneticists . “ClinVar has announced the submission of the one-millionth record to its open-access database. The millionth submission was published on Friday, December 20, 2019, a milestone achievement for providing open access to human variant data with asserted consequences to the clinical genetics and research communities.”

Florida International University: Researchers develop a database of DNA damage

Florida International University: Researchers develop a database of DNA damage. “The frequent exposure to chemicals in the environment and diet leads to the chemical modification of DNA, resulting in the addition of two or more distinct molecules—or adducts— to DNA. Some DNA adducts can induce mutations during cell division, and when occurring in critical regions of the genome, lead to disease, including cancer. A team of researchers are developing and curating a comprehensive international database of DNA adduct standards.”

New York Times: China’s Genetic Research on Ethnic Minorities Sets Off Science Backlash

New York Times: China’s Genetic Research on Ethnic Minorities Sets Off Science Backlash. “China’s efforts to study the DNA of the country’s ethnic minorities have incited a growing backlash from the global scientific community, as a number of scientists warn that Beijing could use its growing knowledge to spy on and oppress its people.”

South China Morning Post: Chinese scholars use AI to screen newborns for genetic disorders via facial scan

South China Morning Post: Chinese scholars use AI to screen newborns for genetic disorders via facial scan. “Researchers from the Shanghai Children’s Medical Centre and the Shanghai Paediatric Centre said their new assistive diagnosis tool, which they described as the first of its kind, was designed to detect more than 100 disorders with distinctive facial features, including Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and Down syndrome, according to a report by state-owned China News Service on Friday.”

PR Newswire: Million Microbiome of Humans Project (MMHP) is launched, aiming to build the world’s largest human microbiome database (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Million Microbiome of Humans Project (MMHP) is launched, aiming to build the world’s largest human microbiome database (PRESS RELEASE). ” The ‘Million Microbiome of Humans Project’ (MMHP) was officially launched at the 14th International Conference on Genomics (ICG-14). Scientists from China, Sweden, Denmark, France, Latvia and other countries will cooperate in microbial metagenomic research, aiming to sequence and analyze one million microbial samples from intestines, mouth, skin, reproductive tract and other organs in the next three to five years to draw a microbiome map of the human body and build the world’s largest database of human microbiome.”

EurekAlert: New database enhances genomics research collaboration

EurekAlert: New database enhances genomics research collaboration. “The MaveDB database is a repository for data from experiments – called multiplex assays of variant effect (MAVEs) – that systematically measure the impact of thousands of individual sequence variants on a gene’s function. These experiments can provide valuable information about how proteins produced by that gene function, how variants in that gene may contribute to disease, and how to engineer synthetic versions of naturally occurring proteins that are more effective than the original protein.”

Sacramento Bee: Genealogy site lets people create fake relative profiles with your DNA, study reveals

Sacramento Bee: Genealogy site lets people create fake relative profiles with your DNA, study reveals. “The rise of genealogy services such as 23andMe and Ancestry.com has brought DNA testing into homes across the United States — and the accompanying explosion of genetic data has helped law enforcement crack cold cases around the country. But University of Washington experts have found that one of the most popular third-party genealogy databases — GEDmatch, which California authorities used to reopen the Golden State Killer case — leaves users’ sensitive genetic data vulnerable to compromise and impersonations.”

University of California Davis: Hobbyist DNA Services May Be Open to Genetic Hacking

University of California Davis: Hobbyist DNA Services May Be Open to Genetic Hacking. “… Professor Graham Coop and postdoctoral researcher Michael ‘Doc’ Edge at the University of California, Davis, Department of Evolution and Ecology warn that these ‘direct to consumer’ services could be vulnerable to a sort of genetic hacking. By uploading selected DNA sequences, they said, it may be possible, for example, to pull out the genomes of most people in a database or to identify people with genetic variants associated with specific traits such as Alzheimer’s disease. “

Newswise: Museums Put Ancient DNA to Work for Wildlife

Newswise: Museums Put Ancient DNA to Work for Wildlife. “Scientists who are trying to save species at the brink of extinction are finding help in an unexpected place. Heather Farrington, curator of zoology for the Cincinnati Museum Center, is using DNA from specimens collected more than 100 years ago to help understand the evolution and stresses faced by today’s animals.”

Haaretz: Magic or a Trap? DNA Changes Study of the Past

Haaretz: Magic or a Trap? DNA Changes Study of the Past. “The ability to extract and sequence DNA from samples that are thousands and even hundreds of thousands of years old has led to significant breakthroughs in the study of evolution. By sequencing Neanderthal genomes, scientists have learned about the health, physical appearance and settlement patterns of Neanderthals. Even more important, DNA research led to the discovery of formerly unknown hominids…. These successes led researches to apply genetic tools to later periods, and according to some critics that is where the danger lies.”

National Institutes of Health: Five Petabytes of Sequence Read Archive Data Now in the Cloud

National Institutes of Health: Five Petabytes of Sequence Read Archive Data Now in the Cloud. “The National Center for Biomedical Information (NCBI) at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) recently moved the five petabytes of public SRA data to the cloud with support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Science and Technology Research Infrastructure for Discovery, Experimentation, and Sustainability (STRIDES) Initiative. These data include a variety of genomes, gene expression data, and more.”

Science Magazine: New federal rules limit police searches of family tree DNA databases

Science Magazine: New federal rules limit police searches of family tree DNA databases. “The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) released new rules yesterday governing when police can use genetic genealogy to track down suspects in serious crimes—the first-ever policy covering how these databases, popular among amateur genealogists, should be used in law enforcement attempts to balance public safety and privacy concerns.”

University Times (Ireland): A Corporation Wants Our Genome Data, While Universities are Denied Access

University Times (Ireland): A Corporation Wants Our Genome Data, While Universities are Denied Access. “To make the most of genetic research, academics need as much information on genes as possible. At the moment, however, that much-needed information is being gifted to a state-funded private company, Genomics Medicine Ireland (GMI). GMI is building a database of genomic information – sequencing the genomic information of people in Ireland, determining the whole genetic code of individuals and then anonymising it with a unique numerical tag.”