University of Connecticut: Researchers to Expand the Encyclopedia of RNA

University of Connecticut: Researchers to Expand the Encyclopedia of RNA. “The National Human Genome Research Institute has awarded genomics expert Brent Graveley and his team $5.6-million to continue to work on an enormous encyclopedia of human RNA molecules and the proteins that bind to them. The grant is jointly awarded to Graveley and Gene Yeo of the University of California, San Diego.”

EurekAlert: Researchers reconstruct the genome of centuries-old E. coli using fragments extracted from an Italian mummy

EurekAlert: Researchers reconstruct the genome of centuries-old E. coli using fragments extracted from an Italian mummy. “An international team led by researchers at McMaster University, working in collaboration with the University of Paris Cité, has identified and reconstructed the first ancient genome of E. coli, using fragments extracted from the gallstone of a 16th century mummy.”

MIT News: New CRISPR-based map ties every human gene to its function

MIT News: New CRISPR-based map ties every human gene to its function. “The Human Genome Project was an ambitious initiative to sequence every piece of human DNA. The project drew together collaborators from research institutions around the world, including MIT’s Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, and was finally completed in 2003. Now, over two decades later, MIT Professor Jonathan Weissman and colleagues have gone beyond the sequence to present the first comprehensive functional map of genes that are expressed in human cells.”

France24: Scientists produce chimp genetic map to combat trafficking

France24: Scientists produce chimp genetic map to combat trafficking. “Scientists have produced the first genetic map of chimpanzees in the wild, offering a detailed reconstruction of the endangered species’ past migrations, and a new tool to combat illegal trafficking. The genomic catalogue, which includes 828 individuals from across their vast African range, can now be used to link kidnapped chimpanzees — or their meat and body parts — to their place of origin within 100 kilometers.”

Associated Press: Scientists finally finish decoding entire human genome

Associated Press: Scientists finally finish decoding entire human genome. “An international team described the first-ever sequencing of a complete human genome – the set of instructions to build and sustain a human being – in research published Thursday in the journal Science. The previous effort, celebrated across the world, was incomplete because DNA sequencing technologies of the day weren’t able to read certain parts of it. Even after updates, it was missing about 8% of the genome.”

UVA Health: A New Tool to Make Genomic Research Reflect the World’s Diversity

UVA Health: A New Tool to Make Genomic Research Reflect the World’s Diversity. “The new tool will allow researchers to compare natural variations in our genes against genome sequences collected from a diverse group of people. Until now, scientists have compared these variations with a ‘reference genome’ primarily sequenced from a few volunteers (~70% from one person) living near laboratories involved in the Human Genome Project almost 20 years ago. This represented genomes from a small number of people in a small number of countries.”

De-extinction puzzle: how decoding numbat DNA could help resurrect the Tasmanian tiger (The Guardian)

The Guardian: De-extinction puzzle: how decoding numbat DNA could help resurrect the Tasmanian tiger. “Researchers at DNA Zoo Australia have mapped the genome of the numbat for the first time. The milestone is notable in its own right, motivated by a desire to improve conservation efforts for the endangered termite-eating marsupial, which is now found only in small pockets of Western Australia. But in announcing the development last week, scientists also had a more extraordinary suggestion: that the numbat’s DNA could be used as a blueprint to bring its extinct cousin, the thylacine, back from the dead.”

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Husker researcher building database to help farmers breed hardier sheep

University of Nebraska-Lincoln: Husker researcher building database to help farmers breed hardier sheep. “The project, funded by a $650,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, will develop a database of traits for robustness and climatic resilience. Researchers will assemble current and additional genetic data, as well as performance records, for several major U.S. sheep breeds: Katahdin, Polypay, Rambouillet and Suffolk.”

UMass Chan Medical School: Elinor Karlsson explains global effort to map genomes of all plants, animals, fungi and more

UMass Chan Medical School: Elinor Karlsson explains global effort to map genomes of all plants, animals, fungi and more. “Elinor Karlsson, PhD, offers insights into various applications of modern comparative genomics in a perspective piece published by the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science. The paper is part of a special feature in PNAS on the Earth BioGenome Project, a global effort to map the genomes of all plants, animals, fungi and other microbial life on Earth. The collection of 10 papers marks a new phase for the Earth BioGenome Project as it moves from pilot projects to full scale production sequencing.”

Vietnam: Big data firm launches nation’s biggest gene database (The Japan News)

The Japan News: Vietnam: Big data firm launches nation’s biggest gene database . “The genomes of over 1,000 people have been analyzed to form a gene database that will serve medical research and practices for the first time in Vietnam. The project by VinBigData sets out to help with the diagnosis and treatment of genetic diseases, and provide data for the application of precision medicine in the country. It also aims to establish a gene database for the Vietnamese, according to Dr. Vu Van Ha, VinBigData scientific director.”

Bloomberg: Scientists discover gene that increases risk of dying from Covid – Times of India

Bloomberg: Scientists discover gene that increases risk of dying from Covid – Times of India. “Polish scientists have discovered a gene that they say more than doubles the risk of falling severely ill with, or even dying from Covid-19. The health ministry in Warsaw expects the discovery to help identify people who are most at risk from the disease, which has already killed more than 100,000 people in Poland alone. It also plans to include genetic tests when it screens patients for potential Covid-19 infections as soon as the end of June.”

The Conversation: From delta to omicron, here’s how scientists know which coronavirus variants are circulating in the US

The Conversation: From delta to omicron, here’s how scientists know which coronavirus variants are circulating in the US. “How do scientists know what versions of the coronavirus are present? How quickly can they see which viral variants are making inroads in a population? Alexander Sundermann and Lee Harrison are epidemiologists who study novel approaches for outbreak detection. Here they explain how the genomic surveillance system works in the U.S. and why it’s important to know which virus variants are circulating.”