Bloomberg: Scientists discover gene that increases risk of dying from Covid – Times of India

Bloomberg: Scientists discover gene that increases risk of dying from Covid – Times of India. “Polish scientists have discovered a gene that they say more than doubles the risk of falling severely ill with, or even dying from Covid-19. The health ministry in Warsaw expects the discovery to help identify people who are most at risk from the disease, which has already killed more than 100,000 people in Poland alone. It also plans to include genetic tests when it screens patients for potential Covid-19 infections as soon as the end of June.”

The Conversation: From delta to omicron, here’s how scientists know which coronavirus variants are circulating in the US

The Conversation: From delta to omicron, here’s how scientists know which coronavirus variants are circulating in the US. “How do scientists know what versions of the coronavirus are present? How quickly can they see which viral variants are making inroads in a population? Alexander Sundermann and Lee Harrison are epidemiologists who study novel approaches for outbreak detection. Here they explain how the genomic surveillance system works in the U.S. and why it’s important to know which virus variants are circulating.”

Cerebral Palsy Alliance: World’s largest genomics database for cerebral palsy launched

Cerebral Palsy Alliance: World’s largest genomics database for cerebral palsy launched. “An international group of researchers has come together to launch CP Commons, a world-first collaborative database to progress understanding of the genome’s role in causing cerebral palsy. The CP Commons is a unique international resource where researchers from around the world will be able to deposit, exchange and access clinical and genomic data.”

New York Times: Timber Poachers Set a Forest on Fire. Tree DNA Sent One to Prison.

New York Times: Timber Poachers Set a Forest on Fire. Tree DNA Sent One to Prison.. “Prosecutors said this was the first time that such evidence had been used in a federal criminal trial, although it has been used in state cases and in federal cases that did not reach trial. Researchers hope this will deter future poaching, particularly of bigleaf maples, for which there is now a large database.”

Phys .org: New database of 660,000 assembled bacterial genomes sheds light on the evolution of bacteria

Phys .org: New database of 660,000 assembled bacterial genomes sheds light on the evolution of bacteria. “In a new study, from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and EMBL’s European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), researchers standardized all bacterial genome data held in the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) before 2019, creating a searchable and accessible database of genomic assemblies. In the research, published on 9 November 2021 in PLOS Biology, researchers reviewed all of the bacterial data available as of November 2018 and assembled it into over 660,000 genomes.”

The Conversation: Old, goopy museum specimens can tell fascinating stories of wildlife history. Finally, we can read them

The Conversation: Old, goopy museum specimens can tell fascinating stories of wildlife history. Finally, we can read them. “In response to the extinction crisis, the call is out to scour Australia’s collections for data to fill knowledge gaps. For many species, however, recovering historical genetic data has been severely impeded, not by a lack of specimens but by the methods used to preserve them. This is where my new research comes in. Our paper shows how natural history collections around the world can squeeze every last drop of historical genetic data out of their specimens, from dried iridescent wings of butterflies to platypus bills floating in alcohol.”

BioSpectrum Asia: Korea to establish national digital library on health and genome data by 2028

BioSpectrum Asia: Korea to establish national digital library on health and genome data by 2028. “The second pilot project will analyze the genetic makeup of 12,500 donated DNA samples from Korean patients living with a rare disease. Over the next year, the resulting data will be used by the Illumina-backed consortium to prepare for the main project in analyzing and comparing the genes of 1 million Koreans to advance the country’s medical technology and improve future public health.”

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health: Introducing WebMeV 2.0: Online Tool for ‘Omics Data Analysis

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health: Introducing WebMeV 2.0: Online Tool for ‘Omics Data Analysis. “WebMeV was created in an effort to democratize bioinformatics processing of RNASeq data. What started as a standalone application has become a web-based application for intuitive GUI implementations of bioinformatics analyses.” WebMeV is free and open source.

BetaKit: Biobox Analytics Launches Platform To Help Scientists Analyze Genomic Data

BetaKit: Biobox Analytics Launches Platform To Help Scientists Analyze Genomic Data. “Founded in 2019 by a trio of University of Toronto graduate students including [Christopher] Li, Hamza Farooq, and Julian Mazzitelli, BioBox offers a subscription-based data analytics platform for scientists working with next-generation sequencing data. The startup’s platform allows researchers to analyze genomic information.”

Engadget: NVIDIA and Harvard researchers use AI to make genome analysis faster and cheaper

Engadget: NVIDIA and Harvard researchers use AI to make genome analysis faster and cheaper. “Scientists from NVIDIA and Harvard have made a huge breakthrough in genetic research. They developed a deep-learning toolkit that is able to significantly cut down the time and cost needed to run rare and single-cell experiments. According to a study published in Nature Communications, the AtacWorks toolkit can run inference on a whole genome, a process that normally takes a little over two days, in just half an hour. It’s able to do so thanks to NVIDIA’s Tensor Core GPUs.”