British Library Maps Blog: The new Roy Military Survey Gazetteer

British Library Maps Blog: The new Roy Military Survey Gazetteer. “The British Library and National Library of Scotland are pleased to announce the availability of a new gazetteer which allows all the names on the Roy Military Survey Maps of Scotland (1747-55, British Library Maps CC.5.a.441) to be searched and browsed. Through the hard work of a team of volunteers over the last six months, all 33,523 names on the Roy Map have been recorded.”

University of New Hampshire: Maps Made Easier

University of New Hampshire: Maps Made Easier. “The New Hampshire Geodata Portal, hosted by New Hampshire Geographically Referenced Analysis and Information Transfer System (NH GRANIT), provides a more modernized data distribution system than its previous version. With data ranging from public lands and topographic lines, to the pavement condition of roads and location of eelgrass meadows in Great Bay, the website will be a boon for a wide cross-section of humanity; surveyors, foresters, real estate agents, engineering companies, utility companies, and state natural resource and transportation agencies will find beneficial information in an easier-to-access format.”

Apple Insider: Apple Maps gets more detailed 3D data for three more countries

Apple Insider: Apple Maps gets more detailed 3D data for three more countries. “France, Monaco, and New Zealand all now have updated terrain and road details as Apple Maps’ new map data reaches sixteen unique locations. New in Apple Maps are better highlighted areas, redesigned name labels, updated terrain information, improved visual clutter, as well as the addition of 3D models in locations for those three countries.”

Michigan Tech: Keweenaw Time Traveler Expands Immersive Experience

Michigan Tech: Keweenaw Time Traveler Expands Immersive Experience. “The acclaimed Keweenaw Time Traveler (KeTT) is getting a major upgrade. On June 1, the online interactive historical atlas will add 600,000 records across 14 million data variables, an exponential increase from its current 25,000. In addition, KeTT will significantly improve user experience. A newly designed user interface makes it easier to search for information about past people, places and stories.”

Dublin City University: Updated Placenames of Ireland website launched by Minister Jack Chambers

Dublin City University: Updated Placenames of Ireland website launched by Minister Jack Chambers . “The updated… website provides a searchable database of the official Irish-language versions of approximately 100,000 places throughout the country. The new Placenames Database of Ireland site features interactive maps, aerial photography and better ease of navigation for those looking to find out the origins of place names from Arklow to Zion Road.”

Route Fifty: How To Rename a Place

Route Fifty: How To Rename a Place. “Louisiana’s Dead Negro Branch was renamed Alexander Branch, after a late local civil-rights leader. Mulatto Mountain, North Carolina, became Simone Mountain, honoring the great Black pianist and singer (and Old North State native) Nina Simone. The new names are the work of the Board on Geographic Names, a little-known federal body with the remarkable power to literally remake the map.”

GIS in State and Local Government: How Geographic Information Systems Aid Agencies (StateTech Magazine)

StateTech Magazine: GIS in State and Local Government: How Geographic Information Systems Aid Agencies. “A recent report from the National States Geographic Information Council revealed that states are making progress on developing their geospatial data capabilities, even though the creation of a National Spatial Data Infrastructure to share geospatial data between states is still out of reach.”

University of Hawaii: UH Hilo geographers’ digital project speeds response to public access queries

University of Hawaii: UH Hilo geographers’ digital project speeds response to public access queries. “Geographers at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo recently completed a pilot project with the County of Hawaiʻi Department of Planning to help modernize the county’s public access program. Shoreline public access locations and associated permitting documents were digitized in a pilot geospatial database by UH Hilo geographical data experts and UH Hilo department of geography and environmental science students and recent graduates.”

Kotaku: Watch A Living Google Map Destroy Geoguessr

Kotaku: Watch A Living Google Map Destroy Geoguessr. “Part of what makes Havrd and others who play Geoguessr at that level of difficulty so good is that they’re able to absorb a staggering amount of contextual clues that non-players wouldn’t think to look for. There are the obvious clues like road signs and landmarks but to get world-record-holding levels of good good, runners have to think creatively. Everything from the local flora to the silhouette of the Google Maps car can tell a player where exactly they are. According to Havrd, he knows when he’s in Kenya because their Google Maps cars have ‘snorkels’ on them. He knows he’s in Nigeria from the orientation of the red and blue lights on the police cars that escort a map car.”

Harvard University Davis Center: Google Needs Historians. (Still.)

Harvard University Davis Center: Google Needs Historians. (Still.). “Gazetteers (databases that associate placenames with location information) like GeoNames and Google Maps are extraordinarily good at recognizing historical places by their contemporary names. They cope remarkably well with alphabets, alternate transliterations and the occasional misspelling…. They are able to do this not because machines are brilliant, but because they have been fed incredible amounts of data by (occasionally brilliant) human beings. What they can’t do, on the fly, yet, is conduct historical research.” A deep and interesting dive.

Down to Earth: New database shows how large rivers form the basis of global borders

Down to Earth: New database shows how large rivers form the basis of global borders. “Rivers have historically provided humans with fresh water, fertile land and food and have, thus, formed the bedrock of several civilisations. A new database, however, quantified how rivers were used to divide land and form international, national and local borders. Rivers make up 23 per cent of international borders, 17 per cent of the world’s state and provincial borders and 12 per cent of all county-level local borders, according to the Global Subnational River-Borders database.” The dataset is available here.

CNET: Google Maps update includes more colorful images and sidewalk info

CNET: Google Maps update includes more colorful images and sidewalk info. “In addition to helping you find your way, the latest Google Maps update will help you know more details about any given area at a glance. Starting this week, Google will shade maps with colors based on satellite imagery so you can easily tell the difference between forests and beaches. The update will be available worldwide and will cover a variety of natural and manmade features.”