Salt Lake Tribune: 115 arches were left out of the reduced Bears Ears and Grand Staircase national monuments. A University of Utah team is creating a digital archive to ‘preserve’ them.

Salt Lake Tribune: 115 arches were left out of the reduced Bears Ears and Grand Staircase national monuments. A University of Utah team is creating a digital archive to ‘preserve’ them.. “[Researchers] have mapped at least 115 natural rock arches — 37 in Grand Staircase and 78 in Bears Ears — that were left outside the monuments when they were drastically reduced in December 2017. The group started a digital archive to ‘preserve a sort of portrait’ of them all, said Jeff Moore, associate professor of geology and geophysics at the U.”

Scoop New Zealand: Handwritten files provide sediment treasure chest

Scoop New Zealand: Handwritten files provide sediment treasure chest. “Marine geologist Dr Helen Bostock has created a new seabed sediment database for New Zealand’s Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and extended continental shelf. The database, called nzSEABED, provides information on the percentage of mud, sand and gravel contained in seafloor sediment, which she has used to produce charts plotting their distribution.”

Carved in stone: recording Scotland’s prehistoric rock art (Current Archaeology)

Current Archaeology: Carved in stone: recording Scotland’s prehistoric rock art. “The ScRAP project aims to record the many examples of prehistoric rock art found across Scotland. As was the case in Kilmartin, there is currently no standardised database and very little contextual information available for the approximately 2,700 examples of rock art so far known in the country. As a community-based initiative, archaeologists on the project are training volunteers across Scotland to record these prehistoric carvings and upload them to the project’s online database. “

Google Blog: Cruising around a supervolcano lake in Street View

Google Blog: Cruising around a supervolcano lake in Street View. “Around 75,000 years ago (give or take a couple of millennia), a supervolcano erupted on the island of Sumatra in Indonesia, throwing out so much ash that it created a volcanic winter lasting several years. The eruption was so massive that the volcano collapsed under its own power, creating the caldera we now call Lake Toba. At over 100 kilometers long and 30 kilometres wide, Lake Toba is the largest volcanic lake in the world. A small team of Googlers spent the last two months scouring every meter of its coastline, using a Street View Trekker mounted on a boat, to collect gorgeous 360-degree imagery around this former supervolcano.”

Phys .org: University of Leicester leads new project to accurately measure Earth’s land temperature

Phys .org: University of Leicester leads new project to accurately measure Earth’s land temperature. “The Land Surface Temperature CCI project is part of a coordinated effort to understand surface temperature change across domains within the European Space Agency’s Climate Change Initiative (CCI), which confronts the challenging set of satellite-based product requirements for climate. Accurate knowledge of land surface temperature (LST) plays a key role in describing the physics of land-surface processes at regional and global scales as they combine information on both the surface-atmosphere interactions and energy fluxes within the Earth Climate System. This provides important information across a range of disciplines including monitoring drought, impact on human health, and changes in vegetation.”