PLOS: Social sensing of urban land use based on analysis of Twitter users’ mobility patterns

PLOS: Social sensing of urban land use based on analysis of Twitter users’ mobility patterns. “A number of recent studies showed that digital footprints around built environments, such as geo-located tweets, are promising data sources for characterizing urban land use. However, challenges for achieving this purpose exist due to the volume and unstructured nature of geo-located social media. Previous studies focused on analyzing Twitter data collectively resulting in coarse resolution maps of urban land use. We argue that the complex spatial structure of a large collection of tweets, when viewed through the lens of individual-level human mobility patterns, can be simplified to a series of key locations for each user, which could be used to characterize urban land use at a higher spatial resolution.”

Phys.org: Detecting dangers with crowdsourcing

Phys.org: Detecting dangers with crowdsourcing. “By the time officials in Flint, Mich., declared a state of emergency in response dangerously high levels of lead in the city’s drinking water in mid-December of 2015, residents had been complaining to each other about discolored and foul-smelling drinking water for more than a year. That time lag, between residents identifying a potential hazard and government officials taking action, shocked Pooja Chandrashekar, A.B. ’18, a biomedical engineering concentrator at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.”

Penn State University: Twitter data changing future of population research

Penn State University: Twitter data changing future of population research. “Twitter may have started out as a way to connect to other people and share news quickly, but the social media platform is also a powerful tool, with the data generated representing the largest publicly accessible archive of human behavior in existence. Guangqing Chi, associate professor of rural sociology and demography and public health sciences in Penn State’s Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology, and Education and director of the Computational and Spatial Analysis (CSA) Core in the Social Science Research Institute, and his team have collected over 30 terabytes of geo-tagged tweets over the last four years.”

Entrepreneur: How to Create a Snapchat Geofilter in 15 Minutes

Entrepreneur: How to Create a Snapchat Geofilter in 15 Minutes. “My goal in this article is to teach everyone who is passionate about social media how to create a Snapchat geofilter in 15 minutes. The best part is that I’m going to explain how you can create a Snapchat geofilter for dirt cheap to grow exposure for your business or personal event with this funky overlay.”

This year’s hot graduation gift: Snapchat geofilters (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: This year’s hot graduation gift: Snapchat geofilters. “In the year since Snapchat began welcoming geofilters, paid submissions have increased to tens of thousands per day. Graphics tied to weddings and birthdays are most popular. But graduations, with 15% of buys, claimed the No. 2 spot from birthdays last month, according to data from Snapchat’s template library. About half of users design from templates provided by Snap Inc., with the rest turning to their own skills or contractors found online.”

Snapchat Maps: How to find every geofilter in the world using this crowdsourced Google tool (Mic)

Mic: Snapchat Maps: How to find every geofilter in the world using this crowdsourced Google tool. “There is a cool little Google Map that is crowdsourcing all the regions around the world with Snapchat Geofilters. It’s not associated by Snapchat and is far from an official list, but it has organized the availability of filters across the globe.” Cool idea, unfortunately a bit light on details.

The Next Web: Snapchat launches a design studio for custom geofilters

The Next Web: Snapchat launches a design studio for custom geofilters. “Snapchat introduced the ability to let you create your own Geofilters – effects that are only available in specific physical locations – early last year, but you had to be familiar with design tools like Photoshop or Illustrator in order to make anything decent. Fret no more: you can now create your own filters from scratch right from your browser.”

Forbes: New ‘Geosocial Index’ Ranks Global Locations By Social Media Activity

Forbes: New ‘Geosocial Index’ Ranks Global Locations By Social Media Activity. “A new startup called HYP3R, which connects social activity to real-world locations, is monitoring and measuring tweets, shares, and posts from tens of thousands of locations in the U.S. and around the planet, starting with stadiums, hotels/conference centers, and hospitals.” And that’s it for the moment, but more venues will be added over time.

Phys.org : Archival photos offer research value

Phys.org: Archival photos offer research value. “Launched just six weeks ago, Smapshot is a public web portal on which anyone can geotag aerial photographs of Switzerland from the 1960s. They superimpose the provided photos onto a virtual map of contemporary Switzerland that was built from data provided by the Federal Office of Topography (Swisstopo). Users can then add anecdotes about the location, provide additional topographical information, chat with other users and share their discoveries on Facebook. And as thanks for their help, they are allowed to print the archival photo that they geotagged.”

Mashable: Snapchat desperately wants businesses to pay for geofilters

Mashable: Snapchat desperately wants businesses to pay for geofilters. “Snapchat needs to make more money, sure. But even more than that, the now-public company needs to attract more advertisers — even to its lower cost ad options — in hopes of turning them into big spenders and cementing the app as a must-buy digital ad platform. To do so, Snapchat is turning to one of its oldest tools: Geofilters.”

CNET: Couples say ‘I do’ to custom Snapchat wedding filters

CNET: Couples say ‘I do’ to custom Snapchat wedding filters. “That Snapchat filters for weddings are even a thing speaks to the pervasive nature of the social network. The company boasted in its IPO filing last week that an average of 158 million people use its app every day. The idea of wedding filters has become so popular that couples hire graphic designers just to create them for their special day. On Etsy, custom Snapchat geofilters have their own marketplace and can sell for up to $100 (roughly converted to £80 or AU$130), though the average price is between $10 to $20.”

Bustle: How To Add Location To Instagram Stories Using Geotags In The App

Nice. I’m all in favor of (consensual, clearly-disclosed) geotagging: How To Add Location To Instagram Stories Using Geotags In The App. “Today, Instagram announced a major upgrade to Stories with the addition of a new Instagram sticker tool that lets users add seasonal stickers and stickers with contextual info like the weather, time, and location. If you’re wondering how to add locations to Instagram Stories using geotags in the app, look not further. I’ve got the full story here — and the short version is ‘It’s super easy.’”

CAMEL Lab, U Chicago, Launches New Data Repository

The CAMEL Lab at the University of Chicago has launched a new online data repository. “The Center for Ancient Middle Eastern Landscapes (CAMEL Lab) at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago would like to announce that a substantial subset of its digital holdings of maps and geospatial data are now available for online public search and download…. CAMEL’s database includes over 20,000 unique objects of spatial data that relate to the archaeology, anthropology, and history of the Middle East, almost 9000 of which are now publicly available. “