Washington Post: It’s the middle of the night. Do you know who your iPhone is talking to?

Washington Post: It’s the middle of the night. Do you know who your iPhone is talking to?. “On a recent Monday night, a dozen marketing companies, research firms and other personal data guzzlers got reports from my iPhone. At 11:43 p.m., a company called Amplitude learned my phone number, email and exact location. At 3:58 a.m., another called Appboy got a digital fingerprint of my phone. At 6:25 a.m., a tracker called Demdex received a way to identify my phone and sent back a list of other trackers to pair up with. And all night long, there was some startling behavior by a household name: Yelp. It was receiving a message that included my IP address -— once every five minutes.”

Engadget: US carriers say they’ve stopped selling location data

Engadget: US carriers say they’ve stopped selling location data. “You might not have to worry quite so much about carriers selling your phone location data to less-than-diligent third parties. AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon (Engadget’s parent company) have provided responses to FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel’s request for an update on the practice, with all four saying they’d halted sales to aggregators sometime after promising to do so back in June 2018. “

TechCrunch: Flaws in a popular GPS tracker leak real-time locations and can remotely activate its microphone

TechCrunch: Flaws in a popular GPS tracker leak real-time locations and can remotely activate its microphone. “A popular GPS tracker — used as a panic alarm for elderly patients, to monitor kids and track vehicles — contains security flaws, which security researchers say are so severe the device should be recalled.”

Ars Technica: Refunds for 300 million phone users sought in lawsuits over location-data sales

Ars Technica: Refunds for 300 million phone users sought in lawsuits over location-data sales. “The four major US wireless carriers are facing proposed class-action lawsuits accusing them of violating federal law by selling their customers’ real-time location data to third parties. The complaints seeking class action status and financial damages were filed last week against AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, and Sprint in US District Court for the District of Maryland.”

Wired: LA’s Plan to Reboot Its Bus System—Using Cell Phone Data

Wired: LA’s Plan to Reboot Its Bus System—Using Cell Phone Data. “Transportation, meanwhile, emits nearly a third of the nation’s climate-change-causing greenhouse gases. Getting people out of cars and into buses and trains is key to knocking that number down. Trains are great, and Los Angeles’ light rail network—84 miles spreading across the Southland—is the largest in the country. But trains are expensive, and they can’t get everywhere. That’s where buses can come in. Yet at the precise moment when it’s most urgent that cities get people out of their cars, bus systems are struggling. So LA is talking about scrapping the system and starting over, the first radical revamp since rail came back to town. To figure out how to do it right, all the city’s transit planners need is location data from about 5 million cell phones.”

Reuters: U.S. congressional leaders query Google on tracking database

Reuters: U.S. congressional leaders query Google on tracking database. ” Top U.S. lawmakers on Tuesday wrote to Google’s chief executive raising concerns about reports of a massive database known as Sensorvault that allegedly contains precise consumer location information from hundreds of millions of devices.”