The Art Newspaper: In the battle against antiquities trafficking, Germany develops app to identify looted cultural heritage

The Art Newspaper: In the battle against antiquities trafficking, Germany develops app to identify looted cultural heritage. “One of the biggest challenges for police and customs officials in combating the illegal trade in looted antiquities is in identifying stolen objects. While drugs or weapons are readily identifiable as illegal imports, stolen antiquities can be passed off as modern copies or legitimate imports if they are accompanied by convincing documentation…. German information technology experts are developing an app to help them, and a prototype may be ready for practical trials by the middle of the year, says Martin Steinebach, the head of media security and IT forensics at the Fraunhofer Institute in Darmstadt.”

Washington Post: Germany and France announce new national lockdowns, saying they have lost control of the coronavirus

Washington Post: Germany and France announce new national lockdowns, saying they have lost control of the coronavirus. ” German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron each announced month-long national lockdowns Wednesday, saying health authorities have lost control of skyrocketing new infections while hospitals fill rapidly. The announcements came as governments across Europe struggle to contain a second wave of the virus in colder weather, even after the relative success of strict lockdown restrictions in the spring.”

Northern Arizona University: Martin-Springer Institute’s new online exhibit shows World War II Europe from a GI’s view

Northern Arizona University: Martin-Springer Institute’s new online exhibit shows World War II Europe from a GI’s view. “James Kuykendall was an amateur photographer who documented his 1942-46 tour through southwest Germany and other Nazi-occupied territories in more than 500 pictures. The collection came to the Martin-Springer Institute after Carol Wittmeier, a physical therapist then living in California, heard that Kuykendall’s descendants were unsure of what to do with the photographs and were considering throwing them out.”

Bloomberg BusinessWeek: Germany Has Its Own Dr. Fauci—and Actually Follows His Advice

Bloomberg BusinessWeek: Germany Has Its Own Dr. Fauci—and Actually Follows His Advice. “Ten months into the pandemic, some countries have practically eradicated the virus while others haven’t come close. Comparisons are tricky, because luck has played a role, and some places enjoyed advantages such as geographical isolation; plentiful hospital beds, respirators, and protective gear; and trust among people, policymakers, and scientists. Germany had most of these going for it, except for the geography part. Even so, it seems fair to say the country has done well with [Christian] Drosten at the forefront of the fight, advocating a robust but clear-headed approach.”

CNN: Germany’s virus response won plaudits. But protests over vaccines and masks show it’s a victim of its own success

CNN: Germany’s virus response won plaudits. But protests over vaccines and masks show it’s a victim of its own success. “Germany has been lauded for its pandemic response, thanks to widescale testing and its fast response to the outbreak which has helped keep its Covid-19 mortality rate low — despite a high number of reported cases. Yet the events at the Reichstag have worried experts that the country has become a victim of its own success, allowing for the spread of coronavirus scepticism.”

Germany coronavirus: ‘Anti-corona’ protests in Berlin draws thousands (BBC)

BBC: Germany coronavirus: ‘Anti-corona’ protests in Berlin draws thousands. “Some 38,000 people took part in a march that split into two main groups. Police ordered one group near the Unter den Linden to disperse for flouting safety rules, then arrested 200 after rocks and bottles were thrown. A second group of about 30,000 met peacefully west of the Brandenburg gate to hear speeches from, among others, the nephew of President John F Kennedy.”

France: Virus cases spike to 4,700 in a day (BBC)

BBC: France: Virus cases spike to 4,700 in a day. “France has reported a sharp rise in the number of coronavirus cases – 4,771 – up a thousand on Wednesday’s figure. It is the first time more than 4,000 daily cases have been seen since May. Meanwhile Spain, Germany and Italy have also recorded their highest numbers of cases since late April or May.”

Coronavirus: Thousands protest in Germany against restrictions (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: Thousands protest in Germany against restrictions. “Thousands of people in the German capital Berlin are taking part in a protest against the country’s coronavirus restrictions. The demonstrators say the measures, including the wearing of facemasks, violate their rights and freedoms. Germany has been less badly affected by the pandemic than some European countries, but cases are starting to rise again.”

Coronavirus: German officials ‘very concerned’ by rising cases (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus: German officials ‘very concerned’ by rising cases. “The head of Germany’s public health agency has said he is ‘very concerned’ by rising infections in the country. ‘We are in the middle of a rapidly developing pandemic,’ Lothar Wieler, head of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), told reporters. Mr Wieler said Germans had become ‘negligent’ and urged people to wear masks and respect social distancing and hygiene rules.”

Washington Post: Angela Merkel is riding high as she steers Europe’s coronavirus recovery effort

Washington Post: Angela Merkel is riding high as she steers Europe’s coronavirus recovery effort. “Earlier this year, German Chancellor Angela Merkel had been written off by many as a lame duck. Her coalition and party were beset by infighting, and speculation was rife that she would buckle to pressure to step aside before the end of her final term in 2021. But a coolheaded and effective response to the coronavirus crisis has pushed Merkel’s approval ratings as high as 86 percent within Germany. She is in a position of strength and confidence this week as she steers Europe’s effort to address what is predicted to be its deepest economic recession on record.”