New York Times: When Facebook Spread Hate, One Cop Tried Something Unusual

New York Times: When Facebook Spread Hate, One Cop Tried Something Unusual. “In most of the world, rumor-fueled meltdowns are taken as a fact of life, a product of Facebook’s propensity for stirring up people’s worst impulses. But Andreas Guske, a trim, steely-eyed police inspector in the refugee-heavy Bavarian town of Traunstein where the rumor circulated, didn’t think his community could afford complacence. Attacks on refugees were already rising. And southern Germany is a front line in Europe’s battle over identity and immigration.”

The Verge: Facebook ordered to stop combining WhatsApp and Instagram data without consent in Germany

The Verge: Facebook ordered to stop combining WhatsApp and Instagram data without consent in Germany. “Germany’s national competition regulator has ordered Facebook to stop combining user data from different sources without voluntary consent. The order applies to data collected by Facebook-owned platforms like WhatsApp and Instagram, but also third-party sources that Facebook uses to flesh out its advertising profiles, including those of non-users.”

ITV: Guernsey WWII bunker with German murals opened years after being sealed

ITV: Guernsey WWII bunker with German murals opened years after being sealed. “A World War 2 bunker in Guernsey has been opened after years of being sealed. The last time the 631b bunker near Richmond Kiosk was accessible was in the early 1980’s and members of the Festung Guernsey Archive group have unsealed it to a record a digital archive of it.”

Associated Press: German politicians’ data posted online, govt probes source

Associated Press: German politicians’ data posted online, govt probes source. “Personal data and documents on hundreds of German politicians and others have been posted online, and German cyber-defense experts were trying to figure out Friday how the information was obtained.”

The Art Newspaper: Berlin’s Natural History Museum receives an eye-watering €660m of public funds for rebuild

The Art Newspaper: Berlin’s Natural History Museum receives an eye-watering €660m of public funds for rebuild. “The budget committee of the German parliament’s lower house has approved €330m—a sum to be matched by the city of Berlin—to finance a ten-year renovation and extension of Berlin’s Natural History Museum and create an online database of its collections.”

The digitized future: How libraries are pioneering a cultural transformation (DW)

DW: The digitized future: How libraries are pioneering a cultural transformation. “Some 120 million visitors take advantage of the educational and cultural offerings of German libraries each year. That’s one reason why, in September, the German Council for Cultural Education published a study on the digitization of library services. One of the results: Digitization has a very positive effect on both the image, and range of services, of libraries.”

Haartez: Holocaust Historian Slams Germany for Shedding Millions of Death Records

Haaretz: Holocaust Historian Slams Germany for Shedding Millions of Death Records. “According to the Hamburg Morgen Post newspaper, the state cultural ministry is defending the decision by the archive’s director, Udo Schäfer, to destroy an estimated 1 million death certificates dating from 1876 to 1953.”