Tribune India: 100 years later, voices from WWI

Tribune India: 100 years later, voices from WWI. “Ten years ago, voice of Mal Singh, a prisoner of war from the First World War, came to India. Held captive at the Half Moon Camp in Germany, the man was batting for hope, remembering the good times in India — the butter he would eat and the milk he would drink…. He was desperate to return home, but doubted if he ever would.” Some of these testimonies are now on YouTube.

New York Times: Germany Acts to Tame Facebook, Learning From Its Own History of Hate

New York Times: Germany Acts to Tame Facebook, Learning From Its Own History of Hate. “Security is tight at this brick building on the western edge of Berlin. Inside, a sign warns: ‘Everybody without a badge is a potential spy!’ Spread over five floors, hundreds of men and women sit in rows of six scanning their computer screens. All have signed nondisclosure agreements. Four trauma specialists are at their disposal seven days a week. They are the agents of Facebook. And they have the power to decide what is free speech and what is hate speech.”

Arizona State University: ASU scholars save priceless manuscripts from obscurity

Arizona State University: ASU scholars save priceless manuscripts from obscurity. “‘You never think you’re going to discover an unknown library ever in your career,’ said Corine Schleif, Arizona State Univeristy professor of art history. She and Volker Schier, a musicologist and visiting faculty at the Institute for Humanities Research, were leading the fortuitous scholars on a tour of European women’s monasteries. The Altomuenster monastery, just northwest of Munich, was their last stop. Left undisturbed for 500 years, the library contained over a thousand previously unknown manuscripts, as well as works of art and devotional objects. If it had belonged to another order, such as the Benedictines or Franciscans, about whom a great deal is already known, it probably wouldn’t have been as monumental a find.”

TechCrunch: German Supreme Court dismisses Axel Springer lawsuit, says ad blocking is legal

TechCrunch: German Supreme Court dismisses Axel Springer lawsuit, says ad blocking is legal . “Germany’s Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit yesterday from Axel Springer against Eyeo, the company behind AdBlock Plus. The European publishing giant (which acquired Business Insider in 2015) argued that ad blocking, as well as the business model where advertisers pay to be added to circumvent the white list, violated Germany’s competition law. Axel Springer won a partial victory in 2016, when a lower court ruled that it shouldn’t have to pay for white listing.”

Reuters: Facebook’s damage limitation drive hits trouble in Germany

Reuters: Facebook’s damage limitation drive hits trouble in Germany. “Facebook’s attempt to limit fallout from a massive data breach hit trouble in Germany on Friday as a privacy watchdog opened a case against the social network and politicians accused its bosses of evasion.”

New Online Witnesses Video Archive: “Memories of the Occupation in Greece” (Freie Universität Berlin)

Freie Universität Berlin: New Online Witnesses Video Archive: “Memories of the Occupation in Greece”. “A new digital archive with memories of eyewitnesses of the occupation of Greece by National Socialist Germany from1941 to 1944 will be presented on Monday, April 23, 2018, at 3 p.m…. The archive contains 90 biographical video interviews referring to the time of the occupation from 1941 to 1944 as well as the living conditions during the years leading up to the occupation and the diverse effects of the occupation on people’s daily lives. In addition, the archive contains transcripts, photos, documents, and other accompanying material.”

Deutsche Welle: Germany demands answers from Facebook over data breach

Deutsche Welle: Germany demands answers from Facebook over data breach. “Germany’s Justice Minister Katarina Barley said on Thursday that she was seeking a meeting with Facebook’s EU management, saying they had questions to answer about the revelations that a private company was able to harvest the data of millions of users. This data was then allegedly sold to political actors seeking to exploit users’ weaknesses with targeted political ads.”