Archinect: Paul Revere Williams archive acquired by USC School of Architecture and Getty Research Institute

Archinect: Paul Revere Williams archive acquired by USC School of Architecture and Getty Research Institute. “The architectural archives of prolific 20th century architect Paul Revere Williams, long thought to have been lost to fire during the 1992 Los Angeles Uprising, have been jointly acquired by the University of Southern California School of Architecture and the Getty Research Institute (GRI). Rather than being lost, however, according to an announcement published by the Getty Research Institute, the archive had been ‘meticulously cared for by Karen Elyse Hudson, Williams’ granddaughter, who has published extensively on his work.'”

Getty Blogs: New on the Getty Research Portal: 900+ free digitized Japanese art exhibition catalogues

Getty Blogs: New on the Getty Research Portal: 900+ free digitized Japanese art exhibition catalogues. “While the physical holdings of our respective institutions may not be accessible at the moment, an ongoing collaboration between the Getty Research Institute (GRI) and the Tokyo National Research Institute for Cultural Properties (TNRICP) has resulted in the digitization of more than 900 exhibition catalogues on Japanese art, which are now freely available and downloadable on the Getty Research Portal. A Japanese announcement is also available.”

Getty Blog: The Simone Forti Archive Comes to Getty

Getty Blog: The Simone Forti Archive Comes to Getty. “The Getty Research Institute has acquired the archive of artist, dancer, performer, and writer Simone Forti, who is one of the most influential artists in the history of Minimalism and experimental dance in the United States.”

Getty Iris: Getty Will Devote $100 Million to Preserve and Study Ancient Art and Sites around the World

The Getty Iris: Getty Will Devote $100 Million to Preserve and Study Ancient Art and Sites around the World. “Today, we at Getty are embarking on an unprecedented and ambitious $100 million global initiative, Ancient Worlds Now: A Future for the Past. Including far-reaching education, research, and conservation efforts unfolding through 2030 and beyond, the initiative seeks to promote a greater understanding of the world’s cultural heritage and its value to global society.”

The Getty Iris: Conservation Work Reveals the Hidden Revisions of Pontormo, Italian Renaissance Master

The Getty Iris: Conservation Work Reveals the Hidden Revisions of Pontormo, Italian Renaissance Master. “Advances in imaging technology have revolutionized science and medicine—and today, they are also revolutionizing the study and conservation of art. New imaging techniques have made it possible for art conservators and conservation scientists to develop treatments for an artwork, and to unlock secrets beneath its surface, just by looking. Imaging techniques also allow specialists to travel back in time and hypothesize what an artist might have reconsidered and altered while painting—a ‘track changes’ of sorts for art. These changes hidden beneath the paint layers are known as pentimenti, derived from the Italian pentirsi, which means to repent or change your mind.”

Getty Iris: Ottoman-Era Photographs Take on New Meaning in Their Digital Life

Getty Iris: Ottoman-Era Photographs Take on New Meaning in Their Digital Life. “In the 1980s the French collector Pierre de Gigord traveled to Turkey and collected thousands of Ottoman-era photographs in a variety of media and formats. The resulting Pierre de Gigord Collection is now housed in the Getty Research Institute, which recently digitized over 12,000 of the nineteenth- and early twentieth-century photographs, making them available to study and download for free online.”

Hyperallergic: As the Getty Digitizes the Archives of the Woman’s Building, Artists Remember Its History

Hyperallergic: As the Getty Digitizes the Archives of the Woman’s Building, Artists Remember Its History. “Earlier this month, the Getty Research Institute announced it was awarded a ‘Save America’s Treasures’ grant to process 11 collections related to the Woman’s Building, the seminal Los Angeles-based center for feminist art that operated from 1973 to 1991. The $284,400 grant, administered by the National Park Service and the Institute of Museums and Library Services, will provide about half the budget for a two-year project of preserving, processing, and digitizing holdings already at the Institute. “

Los Angeles Times: Getty Research Institute launches African American Art History initiative, acquires Betye Saar’s archive

Los Angeles Times: Getty Research Institute launches African American Art History initiative, acquires Betye Saar’s archive. “The program’s mandate includes acquiring archives; the appointment of a curator and bibliographer in African American Art History; annual research fellowships; a plan to conduct oral histories of notable African American artists, scholars, critics, collectors and art dealers; and institutional partnerships with the goal of digitizing existing archival collections and collaborating on joint conferences, publications and research projects.”

Getty: Our Responsibility to Protect Cultural Heritage in Conflict Zones

Getty: Our Responsibility to Protect Cultural Heritage in Conflict Zones. “Monuments of cultural heritage should be protected for what they are: sources of local communal identity and civil society, economic recovery, and, through the military concept of courageous restraint, regional security. For too long, the international community has been slow to respond to this challenge. But things have finally begun to change. In 1998 the Treaty of Rome established the International Criminal Court (ICC) and stipulated as crimes against humanity ‘intentional attacks against buildings dedicated to religion, education, art, science, or charitable purposes, historic monuments…provided they are not military objectives.’ In September 2016 it secured its first conviction, when Ahmad Al Faqi Al-Mahdi confessed to attacking historic and religious buildings in Timbuktu.”

The Getty Iris: Digital Preservation in Practice

The Getty Iris: Digital Preservation in Practice. “At the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles we have been using Rosetta, the digital preservation solution from Ex Libris, since 2012. Although Rosetta is a vendor solution, and so in some ways proprietary, it is based on OAIS (Open Archival Information System) principles and uses many of the standard community-developed digital preservation tools and metadata formats such as Jhove, DROID, PREMIS, and METS. The vendor, Ex Libris, works closely with Rosetta customers to continually enhance the product following best practices for digital preservation. Even with a vendor solution, there is still quite a bit of opportunity for customization and local configuration. We started out preserving materials that we digitized and more recently began depositing born-digital institutional records as well. Below you’ll hear from two of the staff members at the Getty Research Institute who interact with Rosetta on a regular basis. They describe some of the issues they encounter in trying to preserve our resources.”

The Getty: @GettyHub Twitter Offers News for Researchers and Practitioners in Conservation, Art History, and Cultural Heritage

From The Getty: @GettyHub Twitter Offers News for Researchers and Practitioners in Conservation, Art History, and Cultural Heritage. “Calling all Twitter users who work in heritage conservation, humanities research, or digital art history: find us at @GettyHub. This morning the account formerly known as @TheGetty became the new @GettyHub, where we’ll focus on news and resources of interest to the conservation and scholarly communities: new technology tools, collections and exhibitions research, grant and training opportunities, scholarly events, digital and print publications, and updates on staff work behind the scenes.”

Getty Research Institute Library Launches New Blog

The Getty Research Institute Library has a new blog. “Focusing on providing timely news and helpful tips about the library’s broad array of research collections, resources, activities, and services, this new library blog supplements the information about the GRI that you may already receive via the GRI’s website, News, Facebook, and the Getty-wide blog, The Iris.”