Getty: New Project Launches to Identify, Protect, and Celebrate L.A.’s Black Heritage

Getty: New Project Launches to Identify, Protect, and Celebrate L.A.’s Black Heritage. “Despite comprehensive efforts over the years to record Los Angeles’s historic places, the city’s historic designation programs do not yet reflect the depth and breadth of African American history. Just over three percent of the city’s 1,200 designated local landmarks are linked to African American heritage. Over the next three years, the project will work with local communities and cultural institutions to more fully recognize and understand African American experiences in Los Angeles. The work aims to identify and help preserve the places that best represent these stories and work with communities to develop creative approaches that meet their own aims for placemaking, identity, and empowerment.”

Getty: Use Augmented Reality to Explore a Virtual Museum Gallery from Home

Getty: Use Augmented Reality to Explore a Virtual Museum Gallery from Home. “The Getty Museum is partnering with Google Arts & Culture to launch a new exhibition in Pocket Gallery, an immersive exhibition feature within the Google Arts & Culture app that uses augmented reality to open up a life-size virtual space that you can literally step inside using your smartphone…. Getty’s exhibition is called Better Together: Join the Crowd in Celebrated European Paintings, and is inspired by the social gatherings so many of us are missing during the pandemic. The exhibition features four virtual rooms to explore, and each room displays about seven to ten paintings around a theme: City Life, Music and Merriment, A Breath of Fresh Air, and Around the Table.”

Getty: Can Art and Science Solve the Most Complex Challenges of the 21st Century?

Getty: Can Art and Science Solve the Most Complex Challenges of the 21st Century?. “Forty-five cultural, educational, and scientific institutions throughout Southern California received over $5 million in exhibition research grants by the Getty Foundation to prepare for the next edition of the region-wide arts initiative Pacific Standard Time, scheduled to open in 2024. The landmark series will return with dozens of exhibitions and programs focused on the intertwined histories of art and science, past and present. Together, they address some of the most complex challenges of the 21st century—from climate change and environmental racism to the current pandemic and artificial intelligence—and the creative solutions these problems demand.”

Getty: 9 Favorites from the Getty Museum Challenge, Selected by Curators

Getty: 9 Favorites from the Getty Museum Challenge, Selected by Curators. “Back in March, Getty’s social media team invited you to bring creativity to quarantine by re-creating a favorite artwork with three objects (or people or pets) in your home. A tremendous outpouring of beauty, wit, and hilarity followed, as hundreds of thousands of you posted re-creations to the #GettyMuseumChallenge, since transformed into a book raising funds for charity. Many of you have asked about Getty curators’ favorites. In response, three members of Getty’s curatorial teams (representing antiquities, manuscripts, and paintings, respectively) have joined up to offer our perspective on several favorites. As you’ll see, we’re particularly drawn to the many brilliant images that illuminate aspects of the original art—and of the human condition in the time of COVID-19.”

Getty Blogs: Conservation in the Time of COVID

Getty Blogs: Conservation in the Time of COVID. “As I write, we don’t yet know the full socioeconomic impact of the devastating COVID-19 pandemic on people and places around the world. But we know from conversations we’ve had with colleagues and partners globally that cultural heritage places and the many people who rely on them for their livelihoods have been, and continue to be, severely affected. The work we do at Getty to advance the conservation of the world’s cultural heritage engages partners and colleagues around the globe. The pandemic has made us rethink how we do this work and consider how we can continue to engage and support our partners and consultants during this difficult time and beyond.”

To Hold Nature in the Hand: Revealing the Wonders of the Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta (Getty)

Getty: To Hold Nature in the Hand: Revealing the Wonders of the Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta. “Small enough to hold in the hand, the allure of the Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta (Wondrous Monuments of Calligraphy) in the Getty Museum’s collection of manuscripts is undeniable. Hold the book close enough, and the butterflies seem to quiver before your eyes and the fruit looks good enough to eat….Viewable in a newly published facsimile and online, readers can now appreciate the impossibly tiny spiraling micro-writing; observe the subtle differences between the green leaves of the crossed tulips; almost feel the rusting surface of the apple; and be delighted by the hair-fine web spun by the spider.”

Getty Iris: How to Use Getty Open Content for Your Custom Zoom Background

Getty Iris: How to Use Getty Open Content for Your Custom Zoom Background. “Many of us are working from home, and keeping our distance from others. Perhaps there’s a pet or a child keeping us company or getting in the way as we try to focus (insert #coworker joke here). At Getty, our in-person meetings are now virtual, and some of us have turned to the custom Zoom background to help set the mood. Getty’s Open Content program includes over 100,000 images that are free and downloadable. This means they’re also fair game to use as your own custom background.”

Getty Iris: Getty Creates $10 Million LA Arts COVID-19 Relief Fund for Museums and Visual Arts Organizations

Getty Iris: Getty Creates $10 Million LA Arts COVID-19 Relief Fund for Museums and Visual Arts Organizations. “The fund, to be administered by the California Community Foundation, will provide emergency operating support and recovery grants to small and mid-size organizations located in Los Angeles County. The efforts will focus on museums and arts non-profits that contribute significantly to the region’s artistic diversity and are facing great difficulty during the coronavirus crisis. Getty invites other organizations and individuals to contribute to the LA Arts COVID-19 Relief Fund.”

Highlights from Unseen: 35 Years of Collecting Photographs (Getty Iris)

Getty Iris: Highlights from Unseen: 35 Years of Collecting Photographs. “In 1969, after serving as a medic in the Vietnam War, Anthony Hernandez began roaming the inner-city neighborhoods of his native Los Angeles with a 35-millimeter Nikon in hand, looking to capture aspects of L.A.’s distinct urban landscape. A brief encounter with a camera-shy man distributing religious flyers yielded a successful ‘photographic moment,’ according to Hernandez, and helped to launch his long career as a street photographer.”

Getty Iris: Reflections on 10 Years in Art, Archives, and Conservation

Getty Iris: Reflections on 10 Years in Art, Archives, and Conservation. “This decade at Getty, we’ve seen new tools lead to new discoveries under the surface of a Rembrandt painting, watched as Instagram changed the museum experience, and embarked on projects that bring people together across the globe—to name just three. We asked a handful of Getty staffers from various areas of expertise to share their thoughts on what stood out for them as the key development of the past decade. Themes of collaboration, innovation, and open access quickly emerged. While this is not an exhaustive list, it’s certainly something to toast to!”

Getty Iris: After the Fire, Getty Works to Protect Hillsides and Neighbors

Getty Iris: After the Fire, Getty Works to Protect Hillsides and Neighbors. “Less than 24 hours after the fire began, Getty had a post-fire mitigation team on the ground, working with contractors to stabilize the steep terrain and install state-of-the-art steel barriers across the canyons. The barriers act like large metal nets to collect falling rocks, partially burned brush, tree stumps and limbs and other debris loosened by the fire. Water can pass through the nets, but large objects cannot move downhill toward homes.”

Getty Blog: Why the Getty Center Is the Safest Place for Art During a Fire

Getty Blog: Why the Getty Center Is the Safest Place for Art During a Fire. “A major brush fire, dubbed the Getty Fire, broke out in the early morning hours of October 28, 2019, and consumed over 600 acres to the north and west of the Getty Center. Many of you—our visitors, readers, and followers on social media—were immediately concerned about the safety not only of firefighters, nearby residents, and staff, but also of the precious artworks and archival collections housed at the Getty. Were there plans to evacuate the collection? There is no need to evacuate the art or archives, because they are already in the safest place possible: the Getty Center itself. Opened in 1997, the Center is a marvel of anti-fire engineering. Both indoors and outdoors, its materials, design, construction, operations, and controls are purpose-built for safety.”

The Getty Iris: Getty Center Safe and Secure after Mass Efforts in Getty Fire

The Getty Iris: Getty Center Safe and Secure after Mass Efforts in Getty Fire . “Dozens of news media reported on the fire, taking particular interest in Getty fire prevention measures. The Getty Center is well protected from fire due to its construction and architecture, with our 1.5 million feet of travertine stone walls and floors, cement and steel construction, and stone on rooftops that prevents wind-blown embers from igniting. Additional fire-prevention measures include water storage on-site to provide for grounds irrigation.” That on-site water storage includes a million-gallon water tank.

Getty Iris: Getty Will Devote $100 Million to Preserve and Study Ancient Art and Sites around the World

The Getty Iris: Getty Will Devote $100 Million to Preserve and Study Ancient Art and Sites around the World. “Today, we at Getty are embarking on an unprecedented and ambitious $100 million global initiative, Ancient Worlds Now: A Future for the Past. Including far-reaching education, research, and conservation efforts unfolding through 2030 and beyond, the initiative seeks to promote a greater understanding of the world’s cultural heritage and its value to global society.”