Inside Medicine: Schools opened, suicide attempts in girls skyrocketed.

Inside Medicine: Schools opened, suicide attempts in girls skyrocketed.. “After a year of speculation over a brewing mental health crisis among kids and adolescents, in June the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finally released data showing that starting in February of 2021, the number of suspected suicide attempts had dramatically increased among girls ages 12-17 in the United States as compared to 2019. You could almost hear a collective, we told you so, from pundits who had spent the year decrying the closure of schools as Covid-19 tore through the country. To them, these statistics were proof positive that closing schools had brutalized kids. Here’s the snag: the rate of suicide attempts appears to have been inversely related to school closures.”

TechCrunch: Google unveils $25 million in grants aimed at empowering women and girls

TechCrunch: Google unveils $25 million in grants aimed at empowering women and girls. “Google announced a range of programs as well as grants worth $25 million on Monday to fund works of nonprofits and social enterprises that are committed to empower women and girls. Google.org’s new Impact Challenge, unveiled on International Women’s Day, is aimed at addressing systemic barriers and inequities so that women have access to economic equality, opportunity to build financial independence and pursue entrepreneurism, said Google chief executive Sundar Pichai at a virtual event.”

Los Alamos National Library: New virtual platform shows students the science behind everyday objects

Launched last month from Los Alamos National Laboratory, but I missed it: New virtual platform shows students the science behind everyday objects. “What makes bread rise? Why does hand sanitizer keep you from getting sick? How does a microwave oven heat your food? These are just a few of the concepts covered in the new virtual learning platform, See the Science, unveiled in celebration of International Women and Girls in Science Day, February 11, 2021….See the Science targets upper elementary and middle-school students—the age at which students, particularly girls, get intimidated—or inspired—by classes in science, technology, engineering, and math. Materials will also emphasize the scientific contributions of women.” The platform is expected to be available this month.

CNET: COVID-19 creates new barriers to getting girls into tech

CNET: COVID-19 creates new barriers to getting girls into tech. “As students continue remote learning, a lack of resources at home can make it nearly impossible to study properly and connect with teachers. And when women do enter the workforce, it will be harder to find female mentors as we emerge from the COVID-19 era. Multiple family demands in the pandemic are causing women to abandon the workforce four times the rate of men.”

CNET: Black Girls Code wants to diversify the tech industry. Here’s why it’s important

CNET: Black Girls Code wants to diversify the tech industry. Here’s why it’s important. “Women have long been underrepresented in the tech industry. But women of color even more so: One study, by the National Center for Women in IT, reported that Black women in particular held only 3.1% of computing jobs in 2019. Kimberly Bryant is the founder of Black Girls Code, an organization that helps young women of color from underrepresented communities learn skills to help prepare them for STEM careers (science, technology, engineering and math).”

TNW: Google ad portal equated ‘Black girls’ with porn

TNW: Google ad portal equated ‘Black girls’ with porn. “Google’s Keywords Planner, which helps advertisers choose which search terms to associate with their ads, offered hundreds of keyword suggestions related to ‘Black girls,’ ‘Latina girls,’ and ‘Asian Girls’ — the majority of them pornographic, The Markup found in its research. Searches in the keyword planner for ‘boys’ of those same ethnicities also primarily returned suggestions related to pornography.”

TechCrunch: Squad, the ‘anti-bro startup,’ is creating a safe space for teenage girls online

TechCrunch: Squad, the ‘anti-bro startup,’ is creating a safe space for teenage girls online. “Seldom have social tools created by women climbed the latter to mainstream success. Instead, women and girls have battled the lion’s share of digital harassment on popular social platforms — most of which failed early-on to incorporate security features tailored to minority user’s needs — and struggled to find a protected corner of the internet.”

BIG NEWS: 42 New Girl Scout Badges to Change the World (Girl Scouts Blog)

Girl Scouts Blog: BIG NEWS: 42 New Girl Scout Badges to Change the World. “The new programming allows girls to make their own choices about how they want to experience and influence the world while preparing them to address some of society’s most pressing needs through hands-on learning and real-life problem-solving in cybersecurity, coding, space exploration, and citizen science.” This sounds sooooo much better than the Girl Scouts of my youth. I’m a bitty jealous.

Thompson Reuters: Digital girls database to unlock “invisible” discrimination

Thompson Reuters: Digital girls database to unlock “invisible” discrimination. “Researchers are closer to understanding the ‘invisible’ lives of millions of girls – why they flunk school or marry young – with the launch on Wednesday of a digital database tracking girls’ rights around the globe. The database will log policy documents on issues from health to marriage to education, a children’s aid agency said, with the hope that greater scrutiny will improve their life chances.”

Google: Racial and gender gaps in computer science learning: New Google-Gallup research

Research from Google: Racial and gender gaps in computer science learning: New Google-Gallup research. “We surveyed 16,000 nationally representative groups of students, parents, teachers, principals, and superintendents in the U.S. Our findings explore the CS learning gap between white students and their Black and Hispanic peers as well as between boys and girls and confirm just how much demographic differences matter. We’re excited to share this data to bring awareness to issues on the ground in order to help expand CS education in meaningful ways.”

Huge Online Archive of Girl Scout Catalogs

New-to-Me: A huge online collection of Girl Scout catalogs from 1917 to 2015. “There were some years in which a new catalog was not issued; other years have more than one edition. Not only can you follow the different styles, but the prices and the type of items offered. At one time, you could order a pattern and make your own uniform. Newer catalogs have dolls.”