University of Colorado Boulder: Rare glacier research notebooks now available digitally

University of Colorado Boulder: Rare glacier research notebooks now available digitally. “Over 140 documents from notebooks and reports that feature first-person accounts of glacial landscapes from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries are now available to the public through the CU Digital Library. These expedition notebooks and reports come from the Roger G. Barry glaciology collection, which was donated to the CU Boulder Libraries’ Archives from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) in 2017. The contents include glacier and ice discoveries from early expeditions to Alaska and U.S. National Parks, daily logs documenting observations such as weather and occasional interactions with indigenous communities.”

Fire and Ice: New Database Maps and Classifies the Dangers of Glacierized Volcanoes (Columbia University)

Columbia University: Fire and Ice: New Database Maps and Classifies the Dangers of Glacierized Volcanoes. “Destructive volcanic mudflows, huge clouds of volcanic ash that ground flights, and catastrophic floods when natural glacial lake dams fail — these are all examples of the dramatic interactions between volcanoes and glaciers. To help others study, and hopefully predict, dangerous glaciovolcanic activity, researchers have created a new database that combines existing global data.”

Colorado Sun: 50,000 old photos in Golden are helping scientists answer new questions about climate change

Colorado Sun: 50,000 old photos in Golden are helping scientists answer new questions about climate change. “American Alpine Club Library Director Katie Sauter spends a lot of time in the climate-controlled special collections room, flipping through hundred-year-old photographs, black and white images of climbers posing in front of the world’s mountains and glaciers in the early 1900s. While the library is primarily maintained for climbers and historians, there is another interested cohort: glacier scientists.”

Nature: Rescued radar maps reveal Antarctica’s past

Nature: Rescued radar maps reveal Antarctica’s past. “Glaciologists will soon have a treasure trove of data for exploring how Antarctica’s underbelly has changed over nearly half a century. An international team of researchers has scanned and digitized 2 million records from pioneering aeroplane radar expeditions that criss-crossed the frozen continent in the 1960s and 1970s.”