Google Blog: Jacquard and Google Arts and Culture weave tech into art

Google Blog: Jacquard and Google Arts and Culture weave tech into art . “Words that appear out of white tapestries. Music that streams out of black fabric. A mysterious blue cloth-draped spiral that guides you with light and sound. It may sound like a fantasy novel, but these are real works of art made possible with Jacquard by Google. Combining advanced hardware and software technology with textile and manufacturing know-how, Jacquard helps designers make digital experiences out of everyday objects.”

Hindustan Times: Online exhibition ‘Crafted in India’ to showcase handicraft heritage

Hindustan Times: Online exhibition ‘Crafted in India’ to showcase handicraft heritage. “The exquisite basketry of Angami Nagas from Nagaland, Bell Metal Craft of Payyanur in Kerala, the centuries old ‘Mata Ni Pachedi’ textile art of Gujarat and several other crafts of India are now part of Google Arts and Culture platform.”

Engadget: Google used photogrammetry to create a detailed VR tour of Versailles

Engadget: Google used photogrammetry to create a detailed VR tour of Versailles. “If you don’t own a Vive or Rift headset (it’s only available on those two platforms for now), Google has also unveiled an online exhibition featuring over 390 assets, including objects, artifacts and paintings. You can go on a private tour of six of the Palace’s most famous rooms, with accompanying audio from historical experts.”

It’s Nice That: The Museum of Youth Culture opens up vast digital archive, via Google Arts & Culture

It’s Nice That: The Museum of Youth Culture opens up vast digital archive, via Google Arts & Culture. “Today the Museum of Youth Culture launches a major partnership with Google Arts & Culture, which will allow people to explore its vast archive of material online for the first time. Founded in 1997 by Jon Swinstead, co-founder of 90s fashion title Sleazenation, the non-profit collects images, videos, flyers and other ephemera that encapsulate youth culture in London and the UK.”

Google Blog: Japanese food and flavors come to Google Arts & Culture

Google Blog: Japanese food and flavors come to Google Arts & Culture. “The Japanese word ‘meshiagare’ means ‘enjoy your meal.’ And don’t we all enjoy our food more when we know its story? ‘Meshiagare! Flavors of Japan’ is a new online exhibition designed to help us do just that. Presented by Google Arts & Culture and 20 partners, including the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, it brings together thousands of photos and videos exploring the people, places and traditions that make Japanese cuisine so special.”

Chance Coughenour: Google’s digital archaeologist on preserving the past (iNews)

iNews: Chance Coughenour: Google’s digital archaeologist on preserving the past. “Digital archaeologist Chance Coughenour is head of preservation at Google Arts & Culture, the technology giant’s online archive of artworks and collections from galleries and museums across the world – allowing visitors to climb the Eiffel Tower, explore the British Library or examine Van Gogh’s Starry Night in detail via their smartphone. He studied Computing Engineering at West Virginia University before majoring in History, attending his first field school in Belize where he ‘fall in love with archaeology’ thanks to its ancient Maya ruins.”

Google Blog: “Great Sporting Land” tours Australia’s sports-mad history

Google Blog: “Great Sporting Land” tours Australia’s sports-mad history. “Australians have a passion for sports—so much that it was perfectly normal for the Prime Minister to give the entire country the day off when they won a boat race back in 1983. Over generations, Australia’s favorite pastimes have shaped the country’s identity, values and culture. Along with the Melbourne Cricket Club, Australian Football League, National Portrait Gallery and the North Bondi Surf Lifesaving Club, Google Arts & Culture is showcasing the people, moments and places that led Australia to become the ‘Great Sporting Land’ it is today. “