Yahoo Finance: How this Google Glass app is helping give sight to my blind aunt

Yahoo Finance: How this Google Glass app is helping give sight to my blind aunt. “Wendy Poth, my aunt, lost her sight when she was 7. She’s now completely blind, so she doesn’t see shadows, faces or even the darkness when she closes her eyes. Wendy, who’s now in her 60s, has lived an independent life as a therapist and trained social worker. These days, she’s a die-hard technology enthusiast and is rarely seen at home without her Apple Watch Series 3, Amazon Echo and iPhone, which she uses to get news updates, call friends and track her daily activity. So I wasn’t surprised to learn that Wendy signed up to be among the first to try out a new product for the blind and partially sighted called Aira.”

The Hindu: Google Glass returns as aid to autistic kids

The Hindu: Google Glass returns as aid to autistic kids. “Those who declared Google Glass a failure perhaps spoke too soon as it is now resurfacing as a tool to help children with autism improve their social skills. A Massachusetts-based company has developed a system for autism that runs on Google Glass, including the newly released Glass Enterprise Edition. Brain Power, the developer, launched the ‘Empower Me’ system earlier this month. It is a digital coach that runs on smartglasses, to empower children and adults with autism to teach themselves social and cognitive skills.”

Wired: How Google Goggles Won, Then Lost, The Camera-First Future

Wired: How Google Goggles Won, Then Lost, The Camera-First Future. “Robin Williams used to joke that the Irish discovered civilization, then had a Guinness and forgot where they left it. So it was with Google and smartphone cameras. Nearly a decade ago, Google engineers were working on ideas that you’ll now find in Snapchat, Facebook, the iPhone X, and elsewhere. As the tech industry moves towards the camera-first future, in which people talk, play, and work through the lens of their smartphone, Google’s now circling back, tapping those same ideas and trying to finish what it started. This time it’s hoping it’s not too late.” Interesting, extensive article.

Computerworld: Australian Navy trials Google Glass

Computerworld: Australian Navy trials Google Glass. “The Royal Australian Navy Fleet Air Arm (FAA) has staged a proof of concept using Google Glass for aviation maintenance…. The aim was to assess the benefits of using Google Glass to present a head-up display (HUD) to maintenance workers during work on FAA aircraft. It involved using Glass headsets in conjunction with tablets as an alternative to using laptops during some maintenance work on the AS350BA Squirrel helicopter.”

TechRadar: Google Glass is back, but for these people the AR wearable never went away

TechRadar: Google Glass is back, but for these people the AR wearable never went away. “Last month Google announced its intention to sell Glass Enterprise Edition to businesses across the world, and it’s now on sale. However, companies are already using an enterprise/business version of Google Glass, out of the public eye, and have been working with Google on developing for Glass since it first appeared. There’s hidden magic going on, and we’ve talked to some of the people and companies innovating with Glass to see what we’ve been missing, from building jet engines to helping out with invasive surgeries.”

Wired: Google Glass 2.0 Is A Startling Second Act

Wired: Google Glass 2.0 Is A Startling Second Act. “Don’t call Heather Erickson a glasshole. Yes, that’s Google Glass on her frames. But she’s not using it to check her Facebook, dictate messages, or capture a no-hands video while riding a roller coaster. Erickson is a 30-year-old factory worker in rural Jackson, Minnesota. For her, Glass is not a hip way to hang apps in front of her eyeballs, but a tool—as much a tool as her power wrenches. It walks her through her shifts at Station 50 on the factory floor, where she builds motors for tractors.” Should have focused on industry applications to start with…

Ars Technica: Google Glass is apparently back from the dead, starts getting software updates

Ars Technica: Google Glass is apparently back from the dead, starts getting software updates. “Remember Google Glass—Google’s ultra-dorky, poorly supported, $1,500 face computer? Conventional wisdom said that the product was dead: it’s not sold anymore, the website was more or less shut down in 2015, its Twitter and Facebook were deleted, and the OS stopped receiving updates. But someone at Google apparently still cares about this clunky little headset, and this week the device got both a firmware update and a companion app update.”