CNBC: These online volunteers fight fake reviews, ghost listings and other scams on Google Maps — and say the problem’s getting worse

CNBC: These online volunteers fight fake reviews, ghost listings and other scams on Google Maps — and say the problem’s getting worse. “Tom Waddington was hanging out at a friend’s house when he got an unexpected notification from Google Maps. Waddington is part of a group of Google Maps advocates who are trying to improve the service, so he lets Google track his location and frequently adds photos or edits to Maps listings. So the notification itself was routine, but the message was strange: Maps wanted him to contribute information about the Urgent Care center nearby. He was in a residential neighborhood.”

Google Blog: Where’s Waldo? Find him in Google Maps

Google Blog: Where’s Waldo? Find him in Google Maps. “Starting today, you can use Google Maps to join in my amazing adventures for April Fools this week. Are you prepared for a perplexing pursuit? I’ve shared my location with you on Android, iOS and desktop (rolling out now). To start the search, simply update your app or visit google.com/maps on desktop. Then press play when you see me waving at you from the side of your screen. You can even ask the Google Assistant on your phone, Chromebook or Home device, “Hey Google, Where’s Waldo?” to start.”

The Hindu: When logic takes a hike on Google Maps

The Hindu: When logic takes a hike on Google Maps. “As anyone who has sat through grammar lessons can attest: language is a strange and amorphous beast, a spinner of expression that only the native speaker can truly understand, but not necessarily explain to others. A prime example of artificial intelligence going awry is the Google Maps application. While the English version is more or less accurate, the Tamil translations of place names is an inadvertent source of humour and outright ridicule.”