The Verge: The Day the Good Internet Died

The Verge: The Day the Good Internet Died. “Logging on feels like participating in the setup to a Yogi Berra 2.0 ‘terrible food, and such small portions!’–style joke—except that the punch line is about, like, public health statistics instead of prime rib. In the past week alone, the president of the United States and Facebook, each citing the tech company’s handling of pandemic info, have bickered publicly about, oh, just Facebook’s ratio of murderousness to societal benefit. (In other news, there’s a new Space Jam movie out with a villain who is an evil computer named ‘Al-G Rhythm.’)”

NiemanLab: Here’s how to turn your Gmail into Google Reader, kind of

NiemanLab: Here’s how to turn your Gmail into Google Reader, kind of. “After paying for all those damn Substacks, you might as well read them, right? But I’ve found that Gmail isn’t very good at recognizing the newsletters you pay for as important. It doesn’t necessarily treat the newsletter you’re paying $50 a year as different from, say, ‘20% Off Big and Husky Deals Ending Soon! ⏰ ‘ from AutoAnything.com. But journalist Will Oremus, recently of Medium’s OneZero, found a way around this, essentially turning the ‘Forums’ tab of his Gmail into a mini Google Reader (RIP) for newsletters.” No Gmail hack, no matter how clever, is Google Reader. But it IS a clever hack.

Dan McKinley: Google Reader Killed RSS

Dan McKinley: Google Reader Killed RSS. “I miss the RSS world of the early 2000’s as much as anyone. I miss it almost as much as I miss McCarren Pool having no water in it and new Spoon albums sounding fresh. This is why I feel compelled to point out that those mourning Google Reader are forgetting that it was actually responsible for ruining the whole thing.” Not sure I agree with this entirely but it’s a developer perspective I had not considered. Interesting read.

Techdirt: The Death Of Google Reader And The Rise Of Silos

Techdirt: The Death Of Google Reader And The Rise Of Silos. “I’ve been talking a lot lately about the unfortunate shift of the web from being more decentralized to being about a few giant silos and I expect to have plenty more to say on the topic in the near future. But I’m thinking about this again after Andy Baio reminded me that this past weekend was five years since Google turned off Google Reader. Though, as he notes, Google’s own awful decision making created the diminished use that allowed Google to justify shutting it down. Here’s Andy’s tweeted thread, and then I’ll tie it back to my thinking on the silo’d state of the web today.”

Lifehacker: Top 10 Services Google Killed Off

Lifehacker: Top 10 Services Google Killed Off. “Google has a long history of introducing, then forgetting about, and finally officially killing off its products. Most recently, that included Google Spaces, a service that most of us never knew existed to begin with. Let’s take a tour of some of our favorite services Google’s killed off over the years.” Number #1 is Google Reader, of course, and one of the reasons I’m not letting myself get too excited about how well Google Keep and Google Docs work together.