Lab Manager: Google Scholar Shows Bias Against Non-English Papers

Lab Manager: Google Scholar Shows Bias Against Non-English Papers. “If you’ve written a scientific article or conference paper in a language other than English, it may as well not exist on Google Scholar, according to recent research published in Future Internet. Knowing that academic search engines such as Google Scholar have been optimized to ensure that research papers get optimal ranking in search results, researchers from Universitat Pompeu Fabra’s (UPF’s) Department of Communication (Barcelona, Spain) wanted to explore if the language documents were published in affected their ranking by search algorithms.”

Google Scholar Blog: 2019 Scholar Metrics Released

Google Scholar Blog: 2019 Scholar Metrics Released. “Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2019 version of Scholar Metrics. This release covers articles published in 2014–2018 and includes citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of July 2019.”

Google Scholar: 2018 Scholar Metrics Released

Google Scholar Blog: 2018 Scholar Metrics Released. “Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2018 version of Scholar Metrics. This release covers articles published in 2013–2017 and includes citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of July 2018.”

Google Scholar Blog: Follow Related Research for Key Authors

Google Scholar Blog: Follow Related Research for Key Authors. “Scholar provides several ways to keep up with research in your area. You can set up keyword alerts, get recommendations related to your publications and follow your colleagues’ profiles. Today, we are adding another approach to stay up to date in areas of your interest. Now, in addition to following articles by and citations to an author, you can follow research that is related to her work.”

Google Scholar: Query Suggestions for Detailed Queries

Google Scholar: Query Suggestions for Detailed Queries. “Last year we added query suggestions to help students explore topics they may not be familiar with. These suggestions go from a broad search to deeper and more specific areas. But many of you are already well familiar with your research area, and your searches are already specific and detailed. Sometimes, it’s good to take a step back and go into a different, but related, space. Today, we’re adding query suggestions for detailed queries.”

Classic Papers: Articles That Have Stood The Test of Time (Google Scholar Blog)

Google Scholar Blog: Classic Papers: Articles That Have Stood The Test of Time. “Scholarly research is often about the latest findings – the newest knowledge that our colleagues have gleaned from nature. Some articles buck this pattern and have impact long after their publication. Today, we are releasing Classic Papers, a collection of highly-cited papers in their area of research that have stood the test of time. For each area, we list the ten most-cited articles that were published ten years earlier.”

Information Research: ‘Just Google it’ – the scope of freely available information sources for doctoral thesis writing

From Information Research: ‘Just Google it’ – the scope of freely available information sources for doctoral thesis writing. “Recent developments in the field of scientific information resource provision lead us to the key research question, namely,what is the coverage of freely available information sources when writing doctoral theses, and whether the academic library can assume the leading role as a direct intermediator for information users…. The research team was tasked with identifying whether certain resources could be found in the eCatalogue of an academic library, its subscribed databases, freely available online (through Google or Google Scholar), or whether the resources from the library`s subscribed databases are identical to those which are freely available. The data gathering process included such resource categories as journal papers, printed and electronic books or book chapters, and other documents (legal reports, conference papers, newspaper articles, Websites, theses, etc.).”

LSE Impact Blog: Google Scholar is a serious alternative to Web of Science

LSE Impact Blog: Google Scholar is a serious alternative to Web of Science. “Many bibliometricians and university administrators remain wary of Google Scholar citation data, preferring ‘the gold standard’ of Web of Science instead. Anne-Wil Harzing, who developed the Publish or Perish software that uses Google Scholar data, here sets out to challenge some of the misconceptions about this data source and explain why it offers a serious alternative to Web of Science. In addition to its flaws having been overstated, Google Scholar’s coverage of high-quality publications is more comprehensive in many areas, including in the social sciences and humanities, books and book chapters, conference proceedings and non-English language publications.”

Forbes: How Academia, Google Scholar And Predatory Publishers Help Feed Academic Fake News

Forbes: How Academia, Google Scholar And Predatory Publishers Help Feed Academic Fake News . ” The Editor-in-Chief of one of the world’s most prestigious and storied scientific journals recently casually informed me that his journal now astoundingly accepts citations to non-peer-reviewed personal web pages and blog posts as primary citations supporting key arguments in papers published in that journal. You read that correctly. One of the world’s most prestigious scientific journals now permits non-peer-reviewed content from personal web pages and blogs to be cited as primary evidence supporting a claim in a paper published in that journal. Even just a few years ago such a move would have been unheard of, with most reputable journals requiring that citations be almost exclusively to peer-reviewed academic journals to ensure that the body of evidence supporting scholarly discourse was as peer-reviewed and fact checked as possible. When top journals allow an unverified and […]

Jimmy Tidey: Scraping Google Scholar to write your PhD literature chapter

Google Scholar wonks, you’ll like this: Scraping Google Scholar to write your PhD literature chapter. “This post is about a prototype ‘network’ approach to finding papers using data from Google Scholar, hopefully pointing to what could be done with more open data. I was able to use a supervised program searching on Google Scholar to extract my data, but a scalable version of this tool would require open data.”

Research: How well does Google index Harvard’s open-access repository?

In case you were wondering: How well does Google index Harvard’s open-access repository? “From spring of 2015 to the spring of 2016, Rebecca Lewis (UMass-Boston), Alexis Dhembe (Simmons College), and Mark Jemerson (Simmons College) systematically searched for DASH works in Google and Google Scholar. They picked samples from several different categories of DASH records: peer-reviewed articles, working papers, dissertations, conference presentations, old deposits, new deposits, long deposits, short deposits, PDFs, and non-PDFs. They searched for these works by title, and by unique phrases from within the texts. They searched in plain Google and in Google Scholar. Altogether they tested the Google-discoverability of nearly 1,000 works in DASH.”

Google Scholar Target of Porn Spammers?

Good grief! I had no idea that Google Scholar was being targeted by porn spammers. “In this article, we take a closer look at a problem within the Google Scholar parsing engine that has been lightly touched upon by the authors cited above but does not seem to be taken very seriously by the the Google Scholar team. Now seems like a good time to take a look at it since Google Scholar is not only indexing predatory publishers, or false journals that create empty articles to make themselves look like a journal, instead Google Scholar is being targeted by bad players in the porn industry. Something that they seem to be getting pretty good at.”

Non-Anglo Representation in Google Scholar

Interesting: Do Google Scholar, Scopus and the Web of Science speak your language? “Prior research has shown that Google Scholar has a more comprehensive coverage than Scopus or the Web of Science, especially for scholars in the Social Sciences and Humanities. Most recently, Harzing & Alakangas (2016) showed that, on average, the Web of Science had only 23% of the citations of Google Scholar for the Social Sciences and only 7% for the Humanities. For Scopus the respective figures were only slightly better at 30% and 11%. However, all of the academics in this sample were Associate or Full Professors employed at the University of Melbourne, an Anglophone university that is ranked number one in Australia and ranked 22 worldwide in the Times Higher Education ranking for the Social Sciences. Virtually all of the academics’ publications were in English.”