WIRED: Trans Researchers Want Google Scholar to Stop Deadnaming Them

WIRED: Trans Researchers Want Google Scholar to Stop Deadnaming Them. “[Tess] Tanenbaum is one of many academics that have urged Google in recent years to give people more agency over how their names appear on its service. She and other critics of Google Scholar say it subjects trans academics and researchers to deadnaming, the unwelcome and even traumatic mention of a transgender person’s name from before they transitioned.”

Google Scholar Blog: 2022 Scholar Metrics Released

Google Scholar Blog: 2022 Scholar Metrics Released. “Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2022 version of Scholar Metrics. This release covers articles published in 2017–2021 and includes citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of June 2022.”

MakeUseOf: How to Create a Library in Google Scholar

MakeUseOf: How to Create a Library in Google Scholar. “You’re probably aware of Google Scholar and its effectiveness in helping you discover academic material. But did you know that you could enhance your experience even further? One of the ways to do that is by creating a library in Google Scholar that includes articles you want to read later on. In this article, we’ll show you exactly how to make one.”

MakeUseOf: How to Set Up Search Alerts in Google Scholar

MakeUseOf: How to Set Up Search Alerts in Google Scholar. “Email alerts are a useful tool to use to stay updated with new content. Even though annoying promotional emails might make alerts seem like something to avoid, there are times when you might want to be alerted on the latest information. If you love to consume academic content, and you don’t want to miss out on newly published articles, you can create Google Scholar alerts for your email.”

Google Scholar Blog: Save papers to read later

Google Scholar Blog: Save papers to read later. “Found an interesting paper and don’t have time to read it right now? Today we are adding a reading list to your Scholar Library to help you save papers and read them later. You can also use it to save papers you find off-campus but want to read on-campus where you have access to the full text, or papers you find on your smartphone but want to read on a larger screen.”

Google Scholar Blog: 2021 Scholar Metrics Released

Google Scholar Blog: 2021 Scholar Metrics Released. “Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2021 version of Scholar Metrics. This release covers articles published in 2016–2020 and includes citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of July 2020.”

Lab Manager: Google Scholar Shows Bias Against Non-English Papers

Lab Manager: Google Scholar Shows Bias Against Non-English Papers. “If you’ve written a scientific article or conference paper in a language other than English, it may as well not exist on Google Scholar, according to recent research published in Future Internet. Knowing that academic search engines such as Google Scholar have been optimized to ensure that research papers get optimal ranking in search results, researchers from Universitat Pompeu Fabra’s (UPF’s) Department of Communication (Barcelona, Spain) wanted to explore if the language documents were published in affected their ranking by search algorithms.”

Google Scholar Blog: 2019 Scholar Metrics Released

Google Scholar Blog: 2019 Scholar Metrics Released. “Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2019 version of Scholar Metrics. This release covers articles published in 2014–2018 and includes citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of July 2019.”

Google Scholar: 2018 Scholar Metrics Released

Google Scholar Blog: 2018 Scholar Metrics Released. “Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2018 version of Scholar Metrics. This release covers articles published in 2013–2017 and includes citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of July 2018.”

Google Scholar Blog: Follow Related Research for Key Authors

Google Scholar Blog: Follow Related Research for Key Authors. “Scholar provides several ways to keep up with research in your area. You can set up keyword alerts, get recommendations related to your publications and follow your colleagues’ profiles. Today, we are adding another approach to stay up to date in areas of your interest. Now, in addition to following articles by and citations to an author, you can follow research that is related to her work.”

Google Scholar: Query Suggestions for Detailed Queries

Google Scholar: Query Suggestions for Detailed Queries. “Last year we added query suggestions to help students explore topics they may not be familiar with. These suggestions go from a broad search to deeper and more specific areas. But many of you are already well familiar with your research area, and your searches are already specific and detailed. Sometimes, it’s good to take a step back and go into a different, but related, space. Today, we’re adding query suggestions for detailed queries.”

Classic Papers: Articles That Have Stood The Test of Time (Google Scholar Blog)

Google Scholar Blog: Classic Papers: Articles That Have Stood The Test of Time. “Scholarly research is often about the latest findings – the newest knowledge that our colleagues have gleaned from nature. Some articles buck this pattern and have impact long after their publication. Today, we are releasing Classic Papers, a collection of highly-cited papers in their area of research that have stood the test of time. For each area, we list the ten most-cited articles that were published ten years earlier.”

Information Research: ‘Just Google it’ – the scope of freely available information sources for doctoral thesis writing

From Information Research: ‘Just Google it’ – the scope of freely available information sources for doctoral thesis writing. “Recent developments in the field of scientific information resource provision lead us to the key research question, namely,what is the coverage of freely available information sources when writing doctoral theses, and whether the academic library can assume the leading role as a direct intermediator for information users…. The research team was tasked with identifying whether certain resources could be found in the eCatalogue of an academic library, its subscribed databases, freely available online (through Google or Google Scholar), or whether the resources from the library`s subscribed databases are identical to those which are freely available. The data gathering process included such resource categories as journal papers, printed and electronic books or book chapters, and other documents (legal reports, conference papers, newspaper articles, Websites, theses, etc.).”

LSE Impact Blog: Google Scholar is a serious alternative to Web of Science

LSE Impact Blog: Google Scholar is a serious alternative to Web of Science. “Many bibliometricians and university administrators remain wary of Google Scholar citation data, preferring ‘the gold standard’ of Web of Science instead. Anne-Wil Harzing, who developed the Publish or Perish software that uses Google Scholar data, here sets out to challenge some of the misconceptions about this data source and explain why it offers a serious alternative to Web of Science. In addition to its flaws having been overstated, Google Scholar’s coverage of high-quality publications is more comprehensive in many areas, including in the social sciences and humanities, books and book chapters, conference proceedings and non-English language publications.”