UK National Archives: Joint project with UAE to create new website

UK National Archives: Joint project with UAE to create new website. UAE in this case stands for United Arab Emirates. “We plan to launch a new website – the Arabian Gulf Digital Archive – with approximately 500,000 images of The National Archives’ records. These will come from a number of The National Archives’ record series and will focus on documents relevant to the UAE, mainly from Foreign Office series as well as from our Cabinet Office collections. This is the first phase of the project which will proceed with other phases as we discover more documents to be digitised and published online.”

BBC: Chinese ‘cyber-court’ launched for online cases

BBC: Chinese ‘cyber-court’ launched for online cases. “China has launched a digital “cyber-court” to help deal with a rise in the number of internet-related claims, according to state media. The Hangzhou Internet Court opened on Friday and heard its first case – a copyright infringement dispute between an online writer and a web company.”

CyberScoop: FBI pushes private sector to cut ties with Kaspersky

CyberScoop: FBI pushes private sector to cut ties with Kaspersky. “The FBI has been briefing private sector companies on intelligence claiming to show that the Moscow-based cybersecurity company Kaspersky Lab is an unacceptable threat to national security, current and former senior U.S. officials familiar with the matter tell CyberScoop. The briefings are one part of an escalating conflict between the U.S. government and Kaspersky amid long-running suspicions among U.S. intelligence officials that Russian spy agencies use the company as an intelligence-gathering tool of global proportions.”

Wired: When Government Rules by Software, Citizens Are Left in the Dark

Wired: When Government Rules by Software, Citizens Are Left in the Dark. “IN JULY, SAN Francisco Superior Court Judge Sharon Reardon considered whether to hold Lamonte Mims, a 19-year-old accused of violating his probation, in jail. One piece of evidence before her: the output of algorithms known as PSA that scored the risk that Mims, who had previously been convicted of burglary, would commit a violent crime or skip court. Based on that result, another algorithm recommended that Mims could safely be released, and Reardon let him go. Five days later, police say, he robbed and murdered a 71-year old man. On Monday, the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office said staffers using the tool had erroneously failed to enter Mims’ prior jail term. Had they done so, PSA would have recommended he be held, not released.”

New York Times: Cambridge University Press Removes Academic Articles on Chinese Site

New York Times: Cambridge University Press Removes Academic Articles on Chinese Site. “One of the world’s oldest and most respected publishing houses, Cambridge University Press, has bowed to pressure from Beijing and removed sensitive content on its site in China. The content is published in China Quarterly, an academic journal run by the press. In a letter made public on social media on Friday, the editor of the journal, Tim Pringle, said Cambridge University Press had informed him that the authorities had ordered it to censor more than 300 articles related to issues like the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, Tibet, Xinjiang, Hong Kong and the Cultural Revolution. The publishing house’s site risked being shut down if it did not comply with the request, the letter said.”

American Library Association: Victory near in 20-year fight to provide public with CRS reports

American Library Association: Victory near in 20-year fight to provide public with CRS reports. “After nearly 20 years of advocacy by ALA, Congress has recently taken significant steps toward permanently assuring free public access to reports by the Congressional Research Service (CRS). Taxpayers fund these reports but generally have not been able to read them. “

FedScoop: The FBI teamed up with 18F to build an open crime data resource

FedScoop: The FBI teamed up with 18F to build an open crime data resource. “The FBI wants to make national crime data more accessible, and the recently released Crime Data Explorer, built in partnership with 18F, is the agency’s latest attempt at this goal. The interest isn’t new — decades ago it led to the creation of the Uniform Crime Reporting Project, which the bureau was tasked with collecting data for in 1930. But modern technology enables better reporting and more transparency than UCR’s standard yearly reports. And so, in the fall of 2016, the FBI began building the Crime Data Explorer.”