University of California Davis: Internet Communities Can Teach Amateurs to Build Personalized Governments

University of California Davis: Internet Communities Can Teach Amateurs to Build Personalized Governments. “The internet has its perils with privacy breaches and fake news, but on the plus side, a whole generation of youth have been teaching themselves skills in leadership and community-building, according to a new University of California, Davis, study.”

Orissa Post: How social media changed governance in India

Orissa Post: How social media changed governance in India. ” For the Generation Z, it has already become a way of life – tweeting about the problems while getting a passport or writing a Facebook post about the sanitary conditions on trains and expecting a response from the concerned authorities. This was unimagianble just a few years ago. In fact, keeping in line with Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s vision of creating a digitally empowered nation, a large number of leaders, organisations, Ministries and the Armed Forces are marking their presence felt online – that too with witty quips at times.”

The Next Web: Latin American presidents love Twitter – and that’s not a good thing

The Next Web: Latin American presidents love Twitter – and that’s not a good thing. “Politics is not just about running the government, it’s also about creating opportunities for citizens to realise their aspirations. Because Latin American democracy was, in most cases, rolled out without a robust consultative process, decent education system or a plan to address structural poverty, it’s systematically exclusionary…. There are two ways to fill this gap. The first is suppression via the use of force. Though this is fairly common in Latin America, as an official policy it undermines state legitimacy. The other option is to create new mechanisms for state-society relations.” A very interesting read.

Quartz: The solution to US politics’ Facebook problem is Facebook

Quartz: The solution to US politics’ Facebook problem is Facebook. “The further down this road we go, the more we will have to come to grips with the reality that digital tools are essential to successful real-time governance, and that elections themselves are just one data-point in the broader stream of information that can help governments craft better policy. Indeed, the success of societies on the whole may well be determined far more by which adopts to the latest technologies than by which most resembles 18th century American democracy.”

The Guardian: Has the internet become a failed state?

What an interesting way to look at it: Has the internet become a failed state? “The Fragile States Index, an annual report published by the US thinktank the Fund for Peace and the magazine Foreign Policy, defines a fragile state as one ‘whose central government is so weak or ineffective that it has little practical control over much of its territory; non-provision of public services; widespread corruption and criminality; refugees and involuntary movement of populations and sharp economic decline’. Some, but not all, of this maps neatly on to cyberspace.”