Block Club Chicago: Has Your Alderman Been Indicted? New Website Highlights The History Of Corruption In City Hall — And Hopes You’ll Hold New Leaders Accountable

Block Club Chicago: Has Your Alderman Been Indicted? New Website Highlights The History Of Corruption In City Hall — And Hopes You’ll Hold New Leaders Accountable. “Currently, there’s one sitting alderman that is under federal indictment. Sadly, ending up in jail is a common occurrence for Chicago’s leaders — and now South Side journalism lab City Bureau is making it easier for residents to know if their elected alderman is in trouble with he law. City Bureau’s new website… includes information on the aldermen who lead all 50 of Chicago’s wards, as well as the history of political corruption in each ward. Simply plug in your address and find out what your alderman (past or present) has been up to.”

State of Michigan: New Study Guide Enables Educators to Teach the Lessons of Flint

State of Michigan: New Study Guide Enables Educators to Teach the Lessons of Flint. “‘Here’s to Flint.’ With that line, the city of Flint officially shut off the water flowing from Detroit and shifted to pulling its drinking water from the Flint River. The date was April 25, 2014. Five years later, the Michigan Department of Civil Rights has released a new study guide designed to help educators teach the lessons of the Flint water crisis.”

The Diplomat: YouTube Emerges as a New Tool for South Korean Whistleblowers

The Diplomat: YouTube Emerges as a New Tool for South Korean Whistleblowers. “It is an undeniable fact that YouTube has become a daily obsession for many people worldwide. The platform is used by 1.8 billion logged-in users each month, and that figure is only growing. In South Korea, however, YouTube is emerging as more than an entertainment hub. The video platform is becoming a new channel for whistleblowers.”

Techdirt: Malaysian Government Decides To Dump Its Terrible Anti-Fake News Law

Techdirt: Malaysian Government Decides To Dump Its Terrible Anti-Fake News Law. “Malaysia’s government seized upon the term ‘fake news’ as a way to silence coverage of internal corruption. The new law gave the government a way to steer narratives and control negative coverage, going beyond its already-tight control of local media. It would have worked out well for Prime Minister Najib Razak, who was facing a lot of negative coverage over the sudden and unexplained appearance of $700 million in his bank account. Razak is no longer Prime Minister.”

Premium Times Nigeria: CSOs to establish database on corruption cases

Premium Times Nigeria: CSOs to establish database on corruption cases. “Say No Campaign, a coalition of some civil society organisations, says plans are underway by the organisation to establish database of corruption cases across the country to enhance investigation. One of the conveners of the group, Jaye Gaskiya, stated this in Abuja on Wednesday when the group visited the National President of the Nigerian Labour Congress (NLC), Ayuba Wabba, in Abuja.”

The Verge: 200,000 Died In Guatemala’s Civil War — This Digital Archive Is Finally Bringing Families Closure

The Verge: 200,000 Died In Guatemala’s Civil War — This Digital Archive Is Finally Bringing Families Closure. “An estimated 200,000 people were killed, and 45,000 more disappeared, during Guatemala’s 36-year civil war, which ended in 1996. A truth commission later found the state to be responsible for 93 percent of the human rights abuses during that time. And the 80 million pages of police documents currently being cataloged and digitized reveal incriminating details of how forced disappearances were carried out by the state.”

Library of Congress: Library and WGBH Acquire Historic TV Coverage of Senate Watergate Hearings

Library of Congress: Library and WGBH Acquire Historic TV Coverage of Senate Watergate Hearings . “The Library of Congress and Boston public broadcaster WGBH announced today that gavel-to-gavel television coverage of the Senate Watergate hearings in 1973, donated to the Library by WETA Washington, D.C., has been digitally preserved and made available online. Produced by the National Public Affairs Center for Television (NPACT), the hearings were taped during the day and rebroadcast every evening on public television for 51 days, from May 17 to Nov. 15. These broadcasts became one of the most popular series in public broadcasting history.”