Government Publishing Office: GPO Digitizes Historical Editions of U.S. Government Manual

Government Publishing Office: GPO Digitizes Historical Editions of U.S. Government Manual. “The U.S. Government Publishing Office (GPO) has digitized historical editions of the U.S. Government Manual (the Manual), the Government’s official handbook of agency organization for all three branches of Government. Years 1935–1994 of the Manual are now freely accessible and available on govinfo, the one-stop site for authentic, published Government information.”

National Declassification Center Blog: New Records Released – 2020 First Quarter Release List

National Declassification Center Blog: New Records Released – 2020 First Quarter Release List. “On January 3, 2020, the NDC released a listing of 206 entries that completed declassification processing between October 1, 2019 and December 31, 2019. These records are now available for researcher requests. This release consists of textual and special media records from military and civilian agencies as well as the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum.” Note that these have not been digitized, just declassified.

Parliament: Government e-Gazette to be free to public by end-January, says Iswaran (Straits Times)

Straits Times (Singapore): Parliament: Government e-Gazette to be free to public by end-January, says Iswaran. “By end-January, all publications on the Government e-Gazette website will be made available to the public for free, said Minister for Communications and Information S. Iswaran. In a written parliamentary reply to Workers’ Party Non-Constituency MP Leon Perera on Monday (Jan 6), Mr Iswaran said this includes publications that have been published for more than five days.”

Office of the Historian, Foreign Service Institute Release of Foreign Relations of the United States, 1961–1963, Volumes VII, VIII, IX, Arms Control; National Security Policy; Foreign Economic Policy Microfiche Supplement (US Department of State)

US Department of State: Office of the Historian, Foreign Service Institute Release of Foreign Relations of the United States, 1961–1963, Volumes VII, VIII, IX, Arms Control; National Security Policy; Foreign Economic Policy Microfiche Supplement . “From 1993 to 1998, the Foreign Relations series published 13 microfiche supplements that included images of additional documents expanding upon issues addressed in corresponding print volumes in the Eisenhower and Kennedy subseries, which could not be printed due to space limitations. As an addition to the Office of the Historian’s digital archive of the entire Foreign Relations back catalog, the Office is digitizing the text from the microfiche images of these supplements and enriching it to create a full text searchable digital edition and ebooks.”

Speak Out Against Exorbitant Fees: Deadline is December 16 (California Ancestors Blog)

California Ancestors Blog: Speak Out Against Exorbitant Fees: Deadline is December 16. “The genealogy world is abuzz with news that U.S. Customs and Immigration Services (USCIS) has proposed a sharp increase in fees for searches and copies of genealogical and historical records, beginning in 2020…. The records include naturalization certificates, alien registration forms, visa and registry files, and alien files (A-Files), all invaluable resources for researchers. The bureau already charges a nonrefundable $65 fee per search. It proposes to raise that search fee to an exorbitant $240—an increase of 269 percent.”

Foreign Affairs: Trapped in the Archives

Foreign Affairs: Trapped in the Archives. “Did the United States have a hand in assassinating Congolese and Dominican leaders in 1961? What did President Richard Nixon’s White House know about a successful plot to kill the head of the Chilean army in 1970? After the Cold War ended, did top U.S. military commanders retain the authority to strike back if a surprise nuclear attack put the president out of commission? The answers to these and other historical mysteries are likely knowable—but they are locked in presidential libraries and government archives and inaccessible to researchers. The reason: the U.S. government’s system for declassifying and processing historical records has reached a state of crisis.” A really important read. Please do not miss this one.

In the Library’s Web Archives: 1,000 U.S. Government PowerPoint Slide Decks (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: In the Library’s Web Archives: 1,000 U.S. Government PowerPoint Slide Decks. “PowerPoint presentations have become a nearly ubiquitous form of communication document in the digital era. At the most basic level, PowerPoint files present a sequence of slides containing text, images and multimedia. Today, we are excited to share out a dataset of 1,000 random slide decks from U.S. government websites, collected via the Library of Congress Web Archive, such as the presentation on transporting hazardous materials in Figure 1.”