Tennessee State Library & Archives: New Resource for Genealogists at the Tennessee State Library & Archives

Tennessee State Library & Archives: New Resource for Genealogists at the Tennessee State Library & Archives . “A new tool for researchers is now available on the Library & Archives website. The all-in-one Genealogy Index Search brings together over 1 million names appearing in Tennessee’s most important historical records. Inspired by the way Ancestry.com and other online services search multiple record groups from a single screen, staff at the Library & Archives worked with the Secretary of State’s Information Technology Division over a two-year period to create this new resource for genealogists and historians.”

The Journal (Ireland): New historical birth, marriage and death registers available online for public to access

A big thanks to Geneanet for tipping me to this one. I apparently missed it when it was announced in early June. From The Journal: New historical birth, marriage and death registers available online for public to access. “Employment Affairs and Social Protection Minister, Regina Doherty, TD, and Josepha Madigan, TD, Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht have announced that a further tranche of Ireland’s historical Registers of Births, Marriages and Deaths are now available online and free for the public to access.”

Florida Memory: Using Tax Rolls for Family History Research

Florida Memory: Using Tax Rolls for Family History Research. “You’ve probably heard the tired old cliché that nothing in life is certain except for death and paying taxes. Roll your eyes if you must, but if you’re researching your family tree, you can make this reality work in your favor! Tax records are probably one of the most sorely underutilized resources in the genealogist’s toolbox.”

New York Times: Accused of ‘Terrorism’ for Putting Legal Materials Online

New York Times: Accused of ‘Terrorism’ for Putting Legal Materials Online. “Carl Malamud believes in open access to government records, and he has spent more than a decade putting them online. You might think states would welcome the help. But when Mr. Malamud’s group posted the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, the state sued for copyright infringement. Providing public access to the state’s laws and related legal materials, Georgia’s lawyers said, was part of a ‘strategy of terrorism.'”

Genealogy’s Star: Reclaim the Records Files the Biggest Lawsuit Ever

Genealogy’s Star: Reclaim the Records Files the Biggest Lawsuit Ever. “If you are a genealogist and you are unfamiliar with Reclaim the Records, you should be not only familiar with them, but actively supporting them. Record access is one of the major obstacles to genealogical research. Granted, some records, such as the 1890 U.S. Federal Census have been lost through bungling and mismanagement. Other records have been lost through natural disasters and poor conservation practices. But here in the United States, many valuable genealogical records are merely unavailable to genealogical researchers either because they have been hidden behind a paywall or, what is worse, a bureaucratic wall. These obstacles affect all of us, whether we are searching out our ancestors or not.”

NHPR: N.H. Launches Online Database for More Than 16,000 Historical Records

NHPR: N.H. Launches Online Database for More Than 16,000 Historical Records. “State officials launched an online database Tuesday that gives users access to more than 16,000 historical documents. It’s called the Enhanced Mapping and Management Information tool — or EMMIT for short. Envisioned about 20 years ago, the system provides instant access to records.” Apparently this resource will have a cost but it’s not clear from the article how much that cost will be.

Politico: National Archives joins investigation into Interior chief’s missing calendars

Politico: National Archives joins investigation into Interior chief’s missing calendars. “The National Archives and Records Administration gave the Interior Department until late April to address Democrats’ allegations that newly confirmed Secretary David Bernhardt may have been destroying his official calendars, according to a letter POLITICO obtained Friday.”