New York Times: Clearview AI does well in another round of facial recognition accuracy tests.

New York Times: Clearview AI does well in another round of facial recognition accuracy tests.. “In results announced on Monday, Clearview, which is based in New York, placed among the top 10 out of nearly 100 facial recognition vendors in a federal test intended to reveal which tools are best at finding the right face while looking through photos of millions of people. Clearview performed less well in another version of the test, which simulates using facial recognition for providing access to buildings, such as verifying that someone is an employee.”

StateTech: Natural Language Processing Takes Off in State Government

StateTech: Natural Language Processing Takes Off in State Government. “It’s been a decade since IBM’s Watson won $1 million on Jeopardy, demonstrating to millions of Americans on prime-time TV just how well computers can understand humans’ natural language. But that Watson was primitive compared with today’s technology, says IBM Global Chief Artificial Intelligence Officer Seth Dobrin. It’s moved through research and experimentation to now represent a scaled set of AI capabilities focused on language, automation and trust.”

StateTech: Virginia to Offer a Suite of AI Services to State Agencies

StateTech: Virginia to Offer a Suite of AI Services to State Agencies. “Artificial intelligence is starting to grow up in Virginia. The commonwealth is planning to offer AI delivered as a service to a variety of state agencies, starting next year. In 2022, the Virginia Information Technology Agency (VITA) plans to offer AI and machine learning software to other state agencies as well.”

TechRepublic: US government orders federal agencies to patch 100s of vulnerabilities

TechRepublic: US government orders federal agencies to patch 100s of vulnerabilities. “In the latest effort to combat cybercrime and ransomware, federal agencies have been told to patch hundreds of known security vulnerabilities with due dates ranging from November 2021 to May 2022. In a directive issued on Wednesday, the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) ordered all federal and executive branch departments and agencies to patch a series of known exploited vulnerabilities as cataloged in a public website managed by CISA.”

State of Rhode Island: Attorney General launches new open government database ahead of 23rd Annual Open Government Summit

State of Rhode Island: Attorney General launches new open government database ahead of 23rd Annual Open Government Summit. “Attorney General Peter Neronha will host the 23rd Annual Open Government Summit, in partnership with the Roger Williams University School of Law Alumni Association, this Friday, July 30th…. Ahead of this year’s summit, the Office unveiled its new online database for open government findings. Developed by Clerkbase, a company that specializes in online transparency solutions for government agencies, the Attorney General’s new database allows users to browse all open government decisions and seek out specific decisions using advanced search options.” The summit was a livestreamed virtual event. A video is available on YouTube.

Data Literacy in Government: How Are Agencies Enhancing Data Skills? (FedTech)

FedTech: Data Literacy in Government: How Are Agencies Enhancing Data Skills?. “Data literacy is now a common buzzword, spurred by the publication of the Federal Data Strategy 2020 Action Plan last year and the growing empowerment of chief data officers in the government. The document outlines a multiyear, holistic approach to government information that includes building a culture that values data, encouraging strong management and protection and promoting its efficient and appropriate use.”

Bloomberg: Tech Glitches, Swamped Websites Impede U.S. Vaccine Rollout

Bloomberg: Tech Glitches, Swamped Websites Impede U.S. Vaccine Rollout. “Across the U.S., a vaccination campaign that was meant to reverse the tide of the pandemic and spur the nation’s economic recovery is getting bogged down by technical glitches and software woes. Cash-strapped public health departments are trying to keep their websites from crashing while booking millions of appointments, tracking unpredictable inventory, and logging how many shots they give. The situation unfolding across the U.S., home to technology giants, is frustrating a public eager for the inoculations. Further, gaps in the data could be distorting the national picture of how efficiently vaccines are being used, if some number of doses that are administered don’t get counted.”

MIT Technology Review: The Biden administration’s AI plans: what we might expect

MIT Technology Review: The Biden administration’s AI plans: what we might expect. “At the moment, the most pressing issues on his table are fighting the coronavirus pandemic, providing financial relief for Americans, and reversing a series of Trump-era policies on climate change, international relations, and immigration. Artificial intelligence, as expected, hasn’t yet made it to the top of list. But he has given several signals already about how his administration might think about and treat the technology.”

New York Times: Computers Can’t Cut Red Tape

New York Times: Computers Can’t Cut Red Tape. “Arizona has also been a case study of the limits of technology in the teeth of a jobless crisis, government bureaucracy and people trying to game the system. States like Arizona have been plagued by old and underfunded technology systems, but policy choices and the scale of need are the big reasons people are having trouble getting financial help.”