Delft University of Technology: A navigation system with 10 centimeter accuracy

Delft University of Technology: A navigation system with 10 centimeter accuracy. “Researchers of Delft University of Technology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and VSL have developed an alternative positioning system that is more robust and accurate than GPS, especially in urban settings. The working prototype that demonstrated this new mobile network infrastructure achieved an accuracy of 10 centimeter.” Tip o’ the nib to Map Room Blog for the pointer.

Washington University in St. Louis: NSF grant supports development of GPS-free, secure communication

Washington University in St. Louis: NSF grant supports development of GPS-free, secure communication. “Part of modern-day encryption requires precise synchronization of devices. Currently, that’s done using GPS satellites; devices can stay in sync by pinging a satellite at regular intervals. When there is no access to GPS, or if a GPS signal is maliciously jammed or tampered with, there can be no guarantee of secure communications.”

MIT Technology Review: Starlink signals can be reverse-engineered to work like GPS—whether SpaceX likes it or not

MIT Technology Review: Starlink signals can be reverse-engineered to work like GPS—whether SpaceX likes it or not. “Todd Humphreys’s offer to SpaceX was simple. With a few software tweaks, its rapidly growing Starlink constellation could also offer precise position, navigation, and timing. The US Army, which funds Humphreys’s work at the University of Texas at Austin, wanted a backup to its venerable, and vulnerable, GPS system. Could Starlink fill that role?”

University of Alabama: Low-cost Solution Viable for Self-Driving Cars to Spot Hacked GPS

University of Alabama: Low-cost Solution Viable for Self-Driving Cars to Spot Hacked GPS. “A lot of hurdles remain before the emerging technology of self-driving personal and commercial vehicles is common, but transportation researchers at The University of Alabama developed a promising, inexpensive system to overcome one challenge: GPS hacking that can send a self-driving vehicle to the wrong destination.”

The Guardian: Surrey police accused of using ‘phantom’ traffic units on Waze app

The Guardian: Surrey police accused of using ‘phantom’ traffic units on Waze app. “Surrey’s police force has been accused of operating ‘phantom units’ after traffic officers admitted to providing misleading data to a satnav app. Officers said on Twitter that they falsely reported their locations as stationary on the Waze traffic app, which suggests they may be operating a speed trap, when they were in fact driving.”

SF Chronicle: I tracked thieves stealing my car in S.F. Then I saw firsthand what police can — and can’t — do next

SF Chronicle: I tracked thieves stealing my car in S.F. Then I saw firsthand what police can — and can’t — do next. “In San Francisco, a city rife with gadget-lovers and plagued by high property crime, the technology would seem to be a game changer. But in reality, situations like my stolen Subaru can often be mired in unforeseen complications. The response by police has at times been thwarted by legal constraints — for example, an officer generally can’t enter a home just because the Find My iPhone app says your cell is inside — and at other times by what victims say feels like apathy.”

Vice: FBI’s Backdoored Anom Phones Secretly Harvested GPS Data Around the World

Vice: FBI’s Backdoored Anom Phones Secretly Harvested GPS Data Around the World. “Anom, an encrypted phone company marketed to criminals which the FBI secretly took over, surreptitiously recorded every message sent by the phones’ users. But the truly global undercover operation had another secret: The phones also collected users’ precise GPS location and transferred that information to authorities, according to multiple documents reviewed by Motherboard.”

TechCrunch: Garmin global outage caused by ransomware attack, sources say

TechCrunch: Garmin global outage caused by ransomware attack, sources say. “An ongoing global outage at sport and fitness tech giant Garmin was caused by a ransomware attack, according to two sources with direct knowledge of the incident. The incident began late Wednesday and continued through the weekend, causing disruption to the company’s online services for millions of users, including Garmin Connect, which syncs user activity and data to the cloud and other devices.”