ABC News (Australia): Chris sorted through the ‘blood and gore’ on social media. Now he’s suing Facebook over PTSD

ABC News (Australia): Chris sorted through the ‘blood and gore’ on social media. Now he’s suing Facebook over PTSD. “They see the worst the internet serves up so, in theory, you don’t have to. People post shocking violence, sexual abuse, and vitriol-filled hate speech. But those whose job it is to sift through and scrutinise the dark side of social media say the work is taking a heavy toll.”

Washington Post: Father of slain journalist Alison Parker takes on YouTube over alleged refusal to remove graphic videos

Washington Post: Father of slain journalist Alison Parker takes on YouTube over alleged refusal to remove graphic videos. “It has been more than four years since journalist Alison Parker, doing a live television interview in southern Virginia, was killed when a former colleague walked up and shot her and videographer Adam Ward. Despite repeated requests from her father and others, videos of the slaying remain on YouTube, as do countless other graphic videos that show people dying or that promote various outlandish hoaxes.”

BBC: Facebook and YouTube moderators sign PTSD disclosure

BBC: Facebook and YouTube moderators sign PTSD disclosure. “Content moderators are being asked to sign forms stating they understand the job could cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to reports. The Financial Times and The Verge reported moderators for Facebook and YouTube, hired by the contractor Accenture, were sent the documents.”

Washington Post: Social media companies are outsourcing their dirty work to the Philippines. A generation of workers is paying the price.

Washington Post: Social media companies are outsourcing their dirty work to the Philippines. A generation of workers is paying the price.. “A year after quitting his job reviewing some of the most gruesome content the Internet has to offer, Lester prays every week that the images he saw can be erased from his mind. First as a contractor for YouTube and then for Twitter, he worked on a high-up floor of a mall in this traffic-clogged Asian capital, where he spent up to nine hours each day weighing questions about the details in those images. He made decisions about whether a child’s genitals were being touched accidentally or on purpose, or whether a knife slashing someone’s neck depicted a real-life killing — and if such content should be allowed online.”

Business Insider: Instagram’s new TV service recommended videos of potential child abuse

Business Insider: Instagram’s new TV service recommended videos of potential child abuse. “Instagram’s new TV service recommended a crop of graphic and disturbing videos, including what appeared to be child exploitation and genital mutilation. That’s the finding of a Business Insider investigation into IGTV, which launched in June as Instagram attempts to muscle in on rivals like YouTube and Snapchat.”

Revealed: Facebook’s internal rulebook on sex, terrorism and violence (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Revealed: Facebook’s internal rulebook on sex, terrorism and violence. “Facebook’s secret rules and guidelines for deciding what its 2 billion users can post on the site are revealed for the first time in a Guardian investigation that will fuel the global debate about the role and ethics of the social media giant.”

Forbes: Why Don’t Social Media Companies Stop Violent Imagery?

Forbes: Why Don’t Social Media Companies Stop Violent Imagery?. “The intense media coverage this past week of the so-called ‘Facebook killer’ drew attention once again to the horrific ways in which social media platforms can provide a global audience to people who wish to do themselves or others grievous harm and indeed begs the question of whether in the absence of such instant fame would at least some of these acts have been prevented?”

Daily Beast: Microsoft Anti-Porn Workers Sue Over PTSD

The Daily Beast: Microsoft Anti-Porn Workers Sue Over PTSD. Terrible headline. “When former Microsoft employees complained of the horrific pornography and murder films they had to watch for their jobs, the software giant told them to just take more smoke breaks, a new lawsuit alleges.” I’m linking to this here because apparently Mechanical Turk workers also sometimes have to look at graphic and disturbing imagery, and they don’t even have the HR protections to file a lawsuit – at least I wouldn’t think they do because they’d be considered contract workers. Horrifying.

Dennis Cooper is Getting His Blog Back

Dennis Cooper is getting his blog back. “Artist and author Dennis Cooper re-launched his popular blog on Monday after months of legal disputes with Google, who many accused of censorship. The artist posted a message on the blog’s Facebook account on Friday to explain Google’s reasoning for erasing his 14-year-old blog, which housed a gif novel he was working on.”

Facebook Clarifies Its Graphic Content Policy for Facebook Live

Facebook is clarifying its graphic content policy. “Facebook … insists that the video of Philando Castile’s death was temporarily unavailable due to a technical glitch that was Facebook’s fault. That contradicts theories that the video disappeared due to Facebook waffling on whether it should stay up, a high volume of reports of it containing violent content, a deletion by police who’d taken possession of Castile’s girlfriend’s phone and Facebook account or a request from police to remove it. However, Facebook refused to detail exactly what caused the glitch, such as a traffic spike. It did release this statement, however.”