Make Tech Easier: 6 Ways You Can Get Creative with Google Drawings

Make Tech Easier: 6 Ways You Can Get Creative with Google Drawings. “Google Drawings isn’t as popular as Google Docs, Presentation, Form and Spreadsheet, but it’s packed with creative uses you’re probably missing out on. Google Drawings is a free, web-based tool for creating and editing images. Anyone you share links with can edit your content on Google Drawings, so users can collaborate in real-time on the tool. If you have not been using Google Drawings, here are some creative things you can do with it.”

It’s the CR archive: 448 print issues, from 1980 to 2018 (Creative Review)

Creative Review: It’s the CR archive: 448 print issues, from 1980 to 2018. “The first issue of Creative Review came out in May 1980. The cover (above) featured Terence Conran, posing proudly behind a packaging range for now defunct supermarket International, and stills from commercials for Renault, a COI seatbelt campaign, Richard Shops and Barclaycard, in which Dudley Moore played a rather middle-aged punk.” The archive is not free but is available as part of a subscription package. Student rates are also available.

MIT: Digital archive showcases work from the Center for Advanced Visual Studies

MIT: Digital archive showcases work from the Center for Advanced Visual Studies. “In 1967, the newly established MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies (CAVS), founded by professor György Kepes and conceived as a fellowship program for artists, welcomed its first three fellows. Pioneering work at the intersection of art, science, and technology quickly got underway, and in the following decades, more than 200 fellows arrived to participate in this globally influential program, along with researchers and graduate students. Now, as part of a year-long celebration of the 50th anniversary of the founding of CAVS, a new interactive digital archive is offering public access to experimental work created by the fellows, including world-renowned artists such as Otto Piene, Aldo Tambellini, Yvonne Rainer, Nam June Paik, Muriel Cooper, and Stan VanDerBeek.”

Duke University Libraries: Can’t we just make a Venn diagram?

This is good! A walkthrough of the thought process that turns a pile of data into an information visualization. From Duke University Libraries: Can’t we just make a Venn diagram?. “When I’m teaching effective visualization principles, one of the most instructive processes is critiquing published visualizations and reviewing reworks done by professionals…. What we don’t usually get to see is the progression of an individual visualization throughout the design process, from data through rough drafts to final product. I thought it might be instructive to walk through an example from one of my recent consults. Some of the details have been changed because the work is unpublished and the jargon doesn’t help the story.”

Motherboard: The Pentagon Has the Worst PowerPoint Slides You’ve Ever Seen

Motherboard: The Pentagon Has the Worst PowerPoint Slides You’ve Ever Seen. The Pentagon isn’t just America’s military brain—it’s also a vast bureaucracy filled with middle managers and that means it’s churning out lots of presentations. Bureaucratic presentations means PowerPoint, the universally loathed presentation software, and no one gives a [bleepy] PowerPoint quite like the US military. The Internet Archive—the site that catalogs the world’s digital detritus—has scooped up hundreds of publicly available military PowerPoints and preserved them for public consumption.” The original quote was not bleeped.

Creative Boom: Beautifully designed football programmes from 1960s and 1970s

Creative Boom: Beautifully designed football programmes from 1960s and 1970s. “One Shilling (1/-) is an ongoing showcase of beautifully designed football programmes, mostly from the 1960s and ’70s. The project is inspired by an immaculately kept and comprehensive collection of Aston Villa programmes that have been accumulated by designer Matthew Caldwell’s Dad, dating back to the late 60s, when his addiction (‘and it is an addiction’, notes Matthew) to holding a season ticket at the Villa, began.” This is currently an Instagram archive only, with a small (albeit beautifully annotated and photographed) collection. Mr. Caldwell hopes to open an online museum.)