NiemanLab: The New York Times is using Instagram slides and Twitter cards to make stories more digestible

NiemanLab: The New York Times is using Instagram slides and Twitter cards to make stories more digestible . “Last summer, Vox’s Terry Nguyễn wrote about the ways that our Instagram feeds had changed in the wake of the Black Lives Matters movement. We started to see more PowerPoint-looking slides that were made to communicate information about the protests, and they’ve since been co-opted for just about every subject…. But slides like these, when done right and with care, make complex stories (about, say, a mutating virus!) more digestible and accessible.”

FedTech: History of Lorem Ipsum

FedTech: History of Lorem Ipsum. “Have you ever seen the term Lorem Ipsum on a new website? Perhaps you have even tried entering it on Google Translate, but no sensible results came through. Most people who see it the first time think they are in the wrong address only to refresh and come back to the same page. But, what is this mysterious text that you see on pages?”

Engadget: Google Docs will let you overlay text on images like it’s 1997

Engadget: Google Docs will let you overlay text on images like it’s 1997. “Google announced some major changes to Workspace at its recent I/O event, including deeper connections between its productivity and chat apps. But, while eye-catching improvements like ‘smart canvas’ could potentially boost collaboration, some of its online tools still lack rudimentary functions. A new update aims to fix that by bringing a feature available on most word processors to Google Docs. Basically, you can now place an image in front of or behind text while editing a document.” Came for the news and honestly? Stayed for the snark.

How to Use the Canva App: A Beginner’s Guide (MakeUseOf)

MakeUseOf: How to Use the Canva App: A Beginner’s Guide. “When it comes to designing graphics, using your smartphone usually isn’t advised. If you want to see how every element aligns, and make sure there’s not one pixel out of place, your desktop is your best friend. With that said, there are still situations where you may choose to use your phone for image editing. Perhaps you have to create an image on the go, or maybe you just don’t feel like getting off the sofa. Whatever the case, the Canva app can help.”

Hyperallergic: The Enchanting Visuals of Portuguese Fish Tins

Hyperallergic: The Enchanting Visuals of Portuguese Fish Tins. “The idiosyncratic visual culture of Portugal’s tinned foods industry is the subject of Conservas de Portugal, an online museum featuring more than 40,000 entries including fish tin designs, labels, photographs, and more. Its collection is curated by CAN THE CAN, a restaurant in Lisbon associated with the National Association of Manufacturers of Canned Fish (ANICP).”

Creative Review: How the Pandemic Graphic Archive is preserving our new reality

Creative Review: How the Pandemic Graphic Archive is preserving our new reality. “The Pandemic Graphic Archive is one of the various online archives and initiatives cropping up in response to our new reality, just as major cultural institutions have scrabbled to add Covid-related objects to their collections. The ongoing project is the brainchild of recent graphic design graduate Charlotte Walker who, faced with the prospect of an unstable employment market, launched the archive after finishing up at Liverpool John Moores University last summer.” A LOT of floor signage.

Make Tech Easier: 6 Useful Tools to Help You Identify Fonts in Images

Make Tech Easier: 6 Useful Tools to Help You Identify Fonts in Images. “You come across an endless amount of images with text on them. Those images could be advertising or something else. Either way, it’s nothing out of the ordinary to see a font that you want on a picture. The only problem is that you have no idea what that font is called. To help you out, there are various free tools you can use to identify that font. With the following apps, you’ll always be able to identify a font.”

GlobalVoices: Myanmar illustrators unite to distribute protest art for free

GlobalVoices: Myanmar illustrators unite to distribute protest art for free. “A group of 30 artists from Myanmar uploaded more than a hundred protest posters… for free print and use by those rallying against the military coup….The collective noticed that protesters were bringing placards with the illustrators’ art to demonstrations, and indeed many artists had shared their poster designs online for free.”

National Library of Australia: A Century of Australian Advertising Posters

National Library of Australia: A Century of Australian Advertising Posters. “What can we learn from the sentiment and imagery used to sell Australians of the past food, excitement and adventure? How are they reflected in the advertising images we still see today? The National Library of Australia holds a vast number of late-19th and 20th-century Australian advertising posters that are now available to explore online. The collection features many famous brands and illustrators of the time, including Bushells, Ever Ready, James Northfield, Gert Sellheim and Norman Lindsay.”

Little White Lies: An unseen archive of movie poster artwork is being published

Little White Lies: An unseen archive of movie poster artwork is being published. “The vast collection consists of thousands of pieces – from concept art to finished artwork – spanning more than half a century. Many of the designs are alternative and unused versions of classic posters you know and love, such as The Empire Strikes Back and Aliens (which was originally subtitled ‘The Return’) – but there’s also hundreds of more obscure titles, making this a fascinating look back at cinema’s forgotten history. When our friends at Feref, one of the world’s leading film marketing agencies, reached out to us about the project we knew we had to share it with our readers. They’ve launched a crowdfunding campaign to turn the archive into a deluxe coffee table book, bringing this unique visual record to life.”