Mashable: 150,000 handpainted hearts on memorial wall represent each life lost to COVID in the UK

Mashable: 150,000 handpainted hearts on memorial wall represent each life lost to COVID in the UK. “150,000 hand-painted red and pink hearts line a wall beside the River Thames in London, with each heart representing a person lost to COVID-19 in the UK. The National COVID Memorial Wall sits on the embankment on the south side of the River Thames in London, stretching nearly 500 metres between Westminster and Lambeth bridges. The hearts have been handpainted by volunteers.”

Laughing Squid: Images of New Yorkers Lost to COVID-19 Projected Onto the Brooklyn Bridge in a Moving Tribute

Laughing Squid: Images of New Yorkers Lost to COVID-19 Projected Onto the Brooklyn Bridge in a Moving Tribute. “COVID Day of Remembrance, a moving tribute to the 30,258 New Yorkers who died from COVID-19, took place on March 14, 2021. This date marked the tragic anniversary of the first New York City death due to this horrific pandemic. To remember those whom the city has lost forever, images of COVID victims were projected onto the Brooklyn Bridge.”

AP-NORC poll: 1 in 5 in US lost someone close in pandemic (AP)

AP: AP-NORC poll: 1 in 5 in US lost someone close in pandemic. “A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research illustrates how the stage is set for a two-tiered recovery. The public’s worry about the virus has dropped to its lowest point since the fall, before the holidays brought skyrocketing cases into the new year. But people still in mourning express frustration at the continued struggle to stay safe.”

We Remember: New Yorkers share stories of loss, light, and love during the COVID pandemic (6SqFt)

6SqFt: We Remember: New Yorkers share stories of loss, light, and love during the COVID pandemic. “This Sunday, the city will mark March 14–one year since NYC lost its first resident to the virus–with an official day of remembrance for the nearly 30,000 city residents who passed away. For our part, we decided to speak with our fellow New Yorkers and ask who or what they would like to remember on this somber anniversary. It might be someone they’ve lost, someone who did something heroic, or a larger group or event that played a role. And with these raw stories, we think we can describe this year, through all the feelings that can never be put into words.” Heartwarming and agonizing. I cried a lot.

Poynter: Newsrooms in Philly help people say goodbye to those lost to the coronavirus

Poynter: Newsrooms in Philly help people say goodbye to those lost to the coronavirus. “On Wednesday, Resolve Philly and 20 partner newsrooms launched a site meant to give people something the coronavirus pandemic took from a lot of us — the chance to say goodbye. With love: Messages to those lost to COVID is ‘not an obituary, it’s not a summary of a person’s life, it’s what I would say to you if I had the chance to say goodbye,’ said Resolve Philly senior collaborations editor Eugene Sonn.”

KHQA: Memorial website launches to recognize Iowans lost to COVID-19

KHQA: Memorial website launches to recognize Iowans lost to COVID-19. “Anyone who has lost a family member, friend, or loved one due to COVID-19 can submit their name to be listed on an online virtual wall. Along with a growing list of partner organizations, Progress Iowa published the website to recognize this tragic milestone by listing the names of individuals that have passed away and will share memorial events in the coming weeks.”

University of Cambridge: ‘Silent epidemic of grief’ leaves bereaved and bereavement care practitioners struggling

University of Cambridge: ‘Silent epidemic of grief’ leaves bereaved and bereavement care practitioners struggling. “Major changes in bereavement care have occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic, amid a flood of demand for help from bereaved people, according to new research from the University of Cambridge. The first major study of pandemic-related changes in bereavement care has found that the switch to remote working has helped some services to reach out, but many practitioners feel they do not have capacity to meet people’s needs.”

Who Dies: COVID took my grandfather. But it wasn’t what killed him. (The Cut)

The Cut: Who Dies: COVID took my grandfather. But it wasn’t what killed him.. “My grandfather died from complications of COVID-19. The last time I saw him, I wore gloves and a plastic gown, and put a face shield on over a mask. I stood next to his hospital bed with my family. The doctor warned us not to touch him, but I did, gently, one gloved hand over his. That he should die without touch felt intolerable, a punishment for a man who didn’t deserve one. We reminded him that we loved him. My mother told him that the neighborhood bear had returned, that the farmers’ market had good carrots. Despite our alien look, he recognized us. The virus was bad, he said, but he’d fight it. He tried.”

New York Times: Don’t Grieve Alone. Reach Out.

New York Times: Don’t Grieve Alone. Reach Out.. “One of the cruelest realities of this pandemic is that it has deprived so many of us the opportunity to grieve in the most familiar, instinctive ways. We can share stories, cry and laugh together over Zoom, but we can’t simply sit in quiet companionship or hold each other when words fail us. After my loss, I ran out of words to share; I couldn’t imagine calling anyone. How was I going to feel connected to others, find comfort and strength in my friends?” Easier said. UPDATES

Dame: What Are We To Do With All This Grief?

Dame: What Are We To Do With All This Grief?. “I do not know how to talk about this grief. This American grief that I now carry in my heart, in my bones, in every cell and sinew of my being. This grief with which I wake up and go to sleep, this grief that has caught me, some nights, on the way back from the bathroom. It’s too big for me to frame, too vast for me to organize. It’s been overflowing the banks of each and every day since March 13, when the nation began to shut down and then looked up to see that we were dying.”