New York Times: How to Grieve for Online Friends You Had Never Met in Person

New York Times: How to Grieve for Online Friends You Had Never Met in Person. “More than ever before, we are using our smartphones and technology to form meaningful relationships with virtual strangers, both in romance and friendship; we celebrate one another’s successes, share our individual struggles, and despite geographical limitations, these bonds often span years. But what happens when the person on the other side of the screen dies?”

The Verge: The unexpected catharsis of an Instagram location page

The Verge: The unexpected catharsis of an Instagram location page. “My father was born on May 12th. Today he would have turned 56, had he not passed away in 1996. When I was in college, my family and I would visit our motherland in Bangkok over the summer break in May, and our tradition was to always visit the temple where my dad’s ashes resided…. So when my brother and mom went back to Thailand this year without me for the first time in three years, all I could do was journey with them from afar as my brother Instagrammed his way through the travel. But this year, he did something he hadn’t done in the past. He tagged every location he visited, leaving behind breadcrumbs that would lead me to the temple’s location page on Instagram and filling a void I didn’t know existed.”

University of Colorado Boulder: When celebrities die, ‘grief policing’ abounds, social media gets toxic

University of Colorado Boulder: When celebrities die, ‘grief policing’ abounds, social media gets toxic. “After the deaths of David Bowie, Prince and actor Alan Rickman in 2016, grieving fans flocked to public comment threads on social media to pay their respects in what has been likened to a virtual wake. But many also arrived to find a toxic space where so-called ‘grief police’ mocked them for lamenting the loss of a stranger, chastised them for emotional rubber-necking or even dissed the dead. That’s the key finding of a study published this week by CU Boulder researchers who analyzed more than 7,000 Facebook comments to gain insight into how people mourn death in the internet age. Their conclusion: People are surprisingly mean to each other online even in times of tragedy, but some technological fixes could likely make things better.”

NBC Washington: ‘Griefstagram’ Shows New Way to Mourn on Social Media

NBC Washington: ‘Griefstagram’ Shows New Way to Mourn on Social Media . “Kate George was sitting on a plane, swiping through photos on her phone of herself and her late husband when tears began to roll down her face. Only 78 days had passed since he died at age 32. As George wept on a crowded plane this March, she did something she had never done before: She took a photo of herself crying.”

Research: How Twitter Is Changing the Behavior Around Death and Mourning

University of Washington research: ‘I miss you so much’: How Twitter is broadening the conversation on death and mourning. “In a paper that will be presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA), UW doctoral students Nina Cesare and Jennifer Branstad analyzed the feeds of deceased Twitter users and found that people use the site to acknowledge death in a blend of public and private behavior that differs from how it is addressed on other social media sites.”