UConn Today: Humanities Institute Fellow Examines Archive of School Shootings Fiction

UConn Today: Humanities Institute Fellow Examines Archive of School Shootings Fiction. “Hayley Stefan is a doctoral candidate in English and a Humanities Institute Dissertation Research Fellow who is focusing her research on the growing genre of school shooting fiction. Her dissertation is titled: ‘Writing National Tragedy: Race & Disability in Contemporary U.S. Literature and Culture.’ From her dissertation research, she has established The School Shooting Fiction Archive, which investigates school shooting fiction. The archive currently includes 76 school shooting fiction texts published between 1977 and 2019, with more than half published after the shootings in Sandy Hook in December, 2012. She spoke with UConn Today about her research.”

The Guardian: A gun is fired on US school grounds twice a week, database reveals

The Guardian: A gun is fired on US school grounds twice a week, database reveals. “A gun is fired on a school campus in America nearly twice a week. Suicide, homicides, a police shooting, attacks on students by other students: more than once a month this past year, gunfire on American school and university campuses has turned deadly, according to a database of school gunfire incidents compiled by advocates.”

‘Since Parkland’: A remarkable project by teen journalists about kids killed by guns in America (Washington Post)

Washington Post: ‘Since Parkland’: A remarkable project by teen journalists about kids killed by guns in America. “…as the project’s new website explains, more than 200 teen journalists across the country last summer began researching and writing the life stories of young Americans — from newborns to 18-year-olds — who were killed during a year in this country. Their stories start on Feb. 14, 2018, the day a gunman walked into Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., and killed 17 people, 14 of them students. Those young people were not the only ones to die in America from guns that day.”

Whitesplaining on Facebook: PhD Student Donte Newman Looks at Race and Social Media (American University)

American University: Whitesplaining on Facebook: PhD Student Donte Newman Looks at Race and Social Media. “Newman is writing his dissertation on race and social media, specifically examining white people’s Facebook responses to police violence. He’s not just probing racial attitudes, but how people’s interactions with technology shape and reinforce societal power structures. ‘In light of a string of recent shootings, police brutality against black people has emerged as a contentious topic in national dialogue. And many of these conversations are taking place within Facebook,’ says Newman. ‘However, the technological architecture of Facebook may influence how users have conversations about racially motivated police shootings.'”

Chicago Tribune: Tweets from gang members express grief over violence — but then turn to anger, researchers find

Chicago Tribune: Tweets from gang members express grief over violence — but then turn to anger, researchers find. “Four years ago, after learning a friend had been slain, a Chicago street gang member posted a praying hands emoji on her Twitter account lamenting the death. Gakirah Barnes’ grief quickly turned to anger. Within minutes she again took to social media, this time to vow revenge on her rivals — even if they weren’t the ones responsible for killing her friend. Four days later, Barnes, just 17, was dead, shot as she stood with friends on a street in the Woodlawn neighborhood on the South Side.”

CBC News: Deadly force

CBC News: Deadly force. “The cell phone video, which is of poor quality and shot at a distance, shows a man crawling forward on his hands and knees towards a couple of police officers. Suddenly, gunshots reverberate through the street, as eight bullets hit Paul Boyd, killing the 39-year-old instantly. Captured by a bystander, this 2007 incident was one of 461 fatal police encounters in Canada since 2000 — and a new CBC analysis shows that the number is on the rise. In the absence of a national accounting of such encounters between Canadian citizens and law enforcement, a team of CBC researchers spent six months assembling the first country-wide database of every person who died or was killed during a police intervention.”